The Custom of the Country / Edition 1

The Custom of the Country / Edition 1

by Edith Wharton
     
 

ISBN-10: 1551116731

ISBN-13: 9781551116730

Pub. Date: 10/09/2008

Publisher: Broadview Press

Ruthless and predatory, Edith Wharton's seductive young heroine Undine Spragg exploits a series of husbands from the American west to New York and France in her search for one with the ideal combination of social power, money, and material possessions—something "more luxurious, more exciting, more worthy of her!" Wharton's criticism of the leisure-class

Overview

Ruthless and predatory, Edith Wharton's seductive young heroine Undine Spragg exploits a series of husbands from the American west to New York and France in her search for one with the ideal combination of social power, money, and material possessions—something "more luxurious, more exciting, more worthy of her!" Wharton's criticism of the leisure-class marriage market becomes a brilliant satire on the nature of desire, as the novel links marriage and divorce with selfish ambition and the culture of consumerism.

This Broadview edition provides a critical introduction and appendices that include Wharton's outline for and correspondence about The Custom of the Country, excerpts from Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué's novella Undine, and passages from works by Charles Darwin, Emma Goldman, Henry James, and Thorstein Veblen, among others.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551116730
Publisher:
Broadview Press
Publication date:
10/09/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
486
Sales rank:
1,011,167
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Edith Wharton: A Brief Chronology

A Note on the Text

The Custom of the Country

Appendix A: Edith Wharton’s Outline and Notes for The Custom of the Country

  1. “Undine chronology”
  2. “Final version”
  3. Additional Notes

Appendix B: Edith Wharton’s Correspondence about The Custom of the Country

  1. To Morton Fullerton (15 May 1911)
  2. To Bernard Berenson (16 May 1911)
  3. To Bernard Berenson (6 August 1911)
  4. To Charles Scribner (27 November 1911)
  5. To Bernard Berenson (2 August 1913)

Appendix C: From Edith Wharton’s Autobiography, A Backward Glance (1934)

Appendix D: Contemporary Reviews

  1. Nation (15 May 1913)
  2. New York Times Review of Books (19 October 1913)
  3. Independent (13 November 1913)
  4. Athenaeum (15 November 1913)
  5. Bookman (December 1913)
  6. Times Literary Supplement (2 April 1914)
  7. Forum (November 1915)

Appendix E: Women and Marriage

  1. From Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué, Undine (1811)
  2. From Robert Grant, “The Art of Living, IX: The Case of Woman” (1895)
  3. From Harold Frederic, The Damnation of Theron Ware or Illumination (1896)
  4. Letter from Edith Wharton to John Hugh Smith (12 February 1909)
  5. From Emma Goldman, “The Traffic in Women” (1910)

Appendix F: Competition and Consumerism

  1. From Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species (1859)
  2. From Thorstein Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899)
  3. From George Santayana, Character and Opinion in the United States (1920)
  4. From Anita Loos, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1925)

Appendix G: Aestheticism

  1. From Walter Pater, Studies in the History of the Renaissance (1873)
  2. From Harold Frederic, The Damnation of Theron Ware or Illumination (1896)
  3. From Henry James, The American Scene (1907)

Select Bibliography

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