The Dancing Goddesses: Folklore, Archaeology, and the Origins of European Dance
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The Dancing Goddesses: Folklore, Archaeology, and the Origins of European Dance

by Elizabeth Wayland Barber
     
 

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A fascinating exploration of an ancient system of beliefs and its links to the evolution of dance.  See more details below

Overview

A fascinating exploration of an ancient system of beliefs and its links to the evolution of dance.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Traditions of dance and folklore have long been tied to changing seasons and agricultural cycles, and so too have women been linked throughout history to the fertility of the natural world. Basing her investigation on linguistics, archeological evidence, and folklore itself, Barber (Women's Work) explores how the relationship between dance and women has developed over the ages in Europe. She explains that the advent of calendars and holidays were initially intended to aid in agrarian planning; then she focuses on the women who were celebrated and revered during these holidays. They took the form of fairies, mermaids, nymphs, and more, and in their ritual incarnation—whether in art or performance—they were ornamented in silks, skirts, beads, and flora, and could curse or bless the upcoming agricultural season. Rich with anecdotes and compelling explanations of the origin of many modern customs (such as throwing rice at a bride), Barber's is an informative and amusing read, often bringing together many diverse sources—traditional stories, illustrations of artifacts, and aspects of popular culture—into an illuminating whole that will serve as a nice introduction for those unfamiliar with the topic, and a valuable reference for scholars of European dance and folklore. 150 illus. and photos, 9 maps. (Feb.)
Kirkus Reviews
An exhaustive study of how a series of remnants of early religion lie at the roots of European folk dance. Barber (Archaeology and Linguistics Emerita/Occidental College; The Mummies of Urumchi, 1999, etc.) begins with a group of beliefs involving water spirits, which go by different names in different cultures but are generally represented as young women who appear in the forests around the time of spring planting. They appear in various guises from Greece to central Russia, but all are dangerous to men--especially those who come upon them when they are dancing in the woods. Barber collects a number of variations on this legend, noting that the days sacred to them vary with the onset of "Crazy week"--the time of their dominance--in the different regions they inhabit. The investigation then turns to the folk celebrations, many of which involve dances or dancelike rituals, proper to each season of the year; Barber traces correspondences between a pre-Christian nature-based calendar and the church season in different cultures. A second section analyzes a Russian folktale, "The Frog Princess," as it shows the expectations of brides in agricultural societies. Barber goes on to trace remnants of pagan ritual in modern customs, moving back through time to uncover the earliest stages of European history. In the final section, she delves even deeper into prehistory, arguing that dance may actually predate language in human culture. The book is richly illustrated with artifacts from a wide range of eras and cultures. This dense, demanding book will undoubtedly be compared with that early modern classic of speculative anthropology, James George Frazer's The Golden Bough. Difficult but rewarding look at a side of history with which many readers will be unfamiliar.
Booklist
“Starred review. [A] joyfully comprehensive work. . . . Barber’s sprightly study of European dance will be the go-to resource for years to come.”
Library Journal
The dancing goddesses of the title are the swan maidens, mermaids, and tree-spirits that would eventually morph into the "wilis" of the ballet Giselle, the Rusalka of Dvorák's eponymous Czech opera, and the black and white swans of the ballet Swan Lake. Barber (archaeology & linguistics, emerita, Occidental Coll.; The Mummies of Ürümchi), a lifelong folk dancer, explores the origins of dance in this analysis of the folk customs and cultures of Albania, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine, and more. She also investigates the sources of a number of folk customs, such as rituals connected with celebrations of the solstice, weddings, childbirth, and initiations to adulthood. Her research material includes an array of books and articles in various Slavic languages, and her website (elizabethwaylandbarber.com) provides full translations of many of these texts that could only be quoted or summarized in the book. VERDICT Dance historians and students of folklore and archaeology will find much to consider in this scholarly work. An impressive study that weaves together dance, folklore, culture, and mythology.—Carolyn M. Mulac, Chicago P.L.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393065367
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
02/11/2013
Pages:
448
Sales rank:
1,210,313
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.70(d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Wayland Barber is the author of Women’s Work and The Mummies of Ürümchi. Professor emerita of archaeology and linguistics at Occidental College, she lives in California.

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