The Dark Monk (Hangman's Daughter Series #2)

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Overview


THE ANTICIPATED FOLLOWUP TO THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER, THE HANGMAN’S DAUGHTER

1660: Winter has settled thick over a sleepy village in the Bavarian Alps, ensuring every farmer and servant is indoors the night a parish priest discovers he's been poisoned. As numbness creeps up his body, he summons the last of his strength to scratch a cryptic sign in the frost.

Following a trail of riddles, hangman Jakob Kuisl; his headstrong daughter ...

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The Dark Monk (Hangman's Daughter Series #2)

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Overview


THE ANTICIPATED FOLLOWUP TO THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER, THE HANGMAN’S DAUGHTER

1660: Winter has settled thick over a sleepy village in the Bavarian Alps, ensuring every farmer and servant is indoors the night a parish priest discovers he's been poisoned. As numbness creeps up his body, he summons the last of his strength to scratch a cryptic sign in the frost.

Following a trail of riddles, hangman Jakob Kuisl; his headstrong daughter Magdalena; and the town physician’s son team up with the priest’s aristocratic sister to investigate. What they uncover will lead them back to the Crusades, unlocking a troubled history of internal church politics and sending them on a chase for a treasure of the Knights Templar.

But they’re not the only ones after the legendary fortune. A team of dangerous and mysterious monks is always close behind, tracking their every move, speaking Latin in the shadows, giving off a strange, intoxicating scent. And to throw the hangman off their trail, they have ensured he is tasked with capturing a band of thieves roving the countryside attacking solitary travelers and spreading panic.

Delivering on the promise of the international bestseller The Hangman’s Daughter, once again based on prodigious historical research into Pötzsch’s  family tree, The Dark Monk takes us on a whirlwind tour through the occult hiding places of Bavaria’s ancient monasteries, bringing to life an unforgettable compassionate hangman and his tenacious daughter, painting a robust tableau of a seventeenth-century Bavaria still negotiating the lasting impacts of war, and quickening our pulses with a gripping, mesmerizing mystery.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The brutality and ignorance of 17th-century Bavaria serves as the backdrop for Pötzsch’s thrilling second whodunit featuring an unlikely trio of sleuths (after 2011’s The Hangman’s Daughter). When the parish priest, Andreas Koppmeyer, eats some poisoned doughnuts after sealing up a mysterious something in his church basement, he manages to scratch a mark on the frost covering a gravestone as he expires. Figuring out what that dying clue means and who doctored the pastries falls to Altenstadt hangman Jakob Kuisl; his daughter, Magdalena, an apprentice midwife; and her suitor, Simon Fronwieser, a doctor’s son. Fronwieser links a Latin phrase seen in a crypt with the Templars, raising the possibility that Koppmeyer stumbled on a secret relating to that shadowy society. Meanwhile, the depredations of a gang of robbers threaten local commerce. Fans of Michael Gregorio’s early 19th-century Prussian series (Unholy Awakening, etc.) will find a lot to enjoy. Agent: Pia Gotz, Ullstein Verlag. (June)
From the Publisher

"If you enjoy an unlikely hero, look no further. The Dark Monk comes with three...In this subtle, meticulously crafted story, every word is a possible clue, and the characters are so engaging that it’s impossible not to get involved in trying to help them figure the riddle out."—Oprah.com 

"Pötszch knows Germany in his bones." —NPR, On Point

"[A] rousing sequel."

Chicago Tribune

"Swift and sure, compelling as any conspiracy theory, persuasive as any spasm of paranoia, The Dark Monk grips you at the base of your skull and doesn't let go."
—Gregory Maguire, author of Wicked and Out of Oz

"Oliver Pötzsch takes readers on a darkly atmospheric visit to seventeenth-century Bavaria in his latest adventure. With enough mystery and intrigue to satisfy those who like gritty historical fiction, The Dark Monk has convincing characters, rip-roaring action, and finely-drawn settings."
—Deborah Harkness, author of A Discovery of Witches and the forthcoming Shadow of Night

"Weaving together the mystery of a murdered priest, a Templar treasure, and a kind-hearted hangman, Oliver Pötzsch's The Dark Monk is a labyrinth of clues and rich characters in seventeenth-century Bavaria. Pötzsch keeps the action boiling, the clues intriguing, and the history fascinating and authentic."
—William Dietrich, author of The Emerald Storm

"Pötzsch does an excellent job of plunking the reader down in seventeenth-century Germany ... Readers will also appreciate the nice balance between drama, suspense, and humor: this is a serious story, Pötzsch seems to be saying, but it’s OK to have some fun with it. At least two more books in the series are forthcoming, and they will be most welcome."
Booklist

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547807683
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 6/12/2012
  • Series: Hangman's Daughter Series , #2
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 147,744
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

OLIVER PÖTZSCH, born in 1970, has worked for years as a scriptwriter for Bavarian television. He is a descendant of one of Bavaria's leading dynasties of executioners. Pötzsch lives in Munich with his family.

Lee Chadeayne is a former classical musician and college professor. He was one of the charter members of the American Literary Translators Association and is editor-in-chief of ALTA News.

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Read an Excerpt

PROLOGUE

ALTENSTADT NEAR SCHONGAU
ON THE NIGHT OF JANUARY 18, 1660, AD

When the parish priest Andreas Koppmeyer pressed the last stone into place and sealed the opening with lime and mortar, he had just four hours to live.
   With the back of his large hand, he wiped the sweat from his brow and leaned back against the cool, damp wall behind him. Then he looked nervously up the narrow, winding staircase. Was something moving up there? Again, he heard the floorboards creaking as if someone were moving stealthily across the floor above him in the church. But it could have just been his imagination. Wood warps, and the St. Lawrence Church was old and crumbling. It was not for nothing that workmen had been there for the last few weeks repairing the building so that it wouldn’t someday come crashing down during mass.
   A January storm was whistling around the weathered walls and shaking the wooden shutters. But it wasn’t just due to the cold down here in the crypt that the priest was trembling. Pulling his worn cassock tightly around him, he scrutinized the bricked-up wall once more and then started the climb back up the stairway to the church. His steps echoed on the worn, frost-covered stairs. Suddenly, the howling of the storm got louder so that he could no longer hear the soft creaking in the balcony above him. He must have been mistaken. Who would still be here in the church at this hour, for heaven’s sake? It was way past midnight. His housekeeper Magda had gone to bed hours ago in the little rectory next door and the old sexton would not return until it was time to ring the bells at six in the morning.
   Pastor Andreas Koppmeyer climbed the final steps out of the crypt. His broad figure completely filled the opening in the church floor. He was more than six feet tall, a bear of a man who, with his long, broad beard and bushy black eyebrows, looked like the personification of an Old Testament God. When Koppmeyer stood before the altar in his black robe and delivered his homilies in a deep, gruff voice, his appearance alone caused his flock to tremble and instilled in them the fear of purgatory.
   With both hands, the pastor gripped the slab covering the crypt. It weighed several hundred pounds, and he panted as he pushed it back over the opening. It made a crunching sound as he set it down, but it covered the crypt perfectly, as if it had never been opened. Koppmeyer examined his work with satisfaction and then made his way back through the storm.
   As he started to open the church door, he noticed that snow was already gathering in high drifts in front of the portal. With a groan, he pressed his shoulder against the heavy oaken door until it opened a crack and he was just able to squeeze through. Snowflakes lashed his face like little thorns and he had to close his eyes as he trudged back to the rectory.
   It was only about thirty paces back to the little house, but it seemed like an eternity to the pastor. The wind tugged hard at his cassock and it fluttered around him like a tattered flag. The snow was almost up to his hips and even Koppmeyer, with his massive body, had to struggle to move forward. As he fought his way step by step through the storm and the darkness, he kept thinking of the events of the last two weeks. Pastor Koppmeyer was a simple man of God, but even he had noticed that his discovery was something extraordinary, something a little too sensitive for him to deal with and that would best be left to others. He did the right thing in hiding it behind the wall and letting more powerful, knowledgeable people decide whether it should ever be opened again. Perhaps he should not have written the letter to Benedikta, but he had always trusted his younger sister. She was amazingly bright and well read for a woman and he had often asked her for advice. Surely she would know what to do this time as well.
   Andreas Koppmeyer was suddenly wakened from his reveries. Out of the corner of his eye, he thought he saw something moving to the right, behind the woodpile near the house. He squinted and held his hand over his eyes to protect them from the snowflakes, but he couldn’t make out anything. It was too dark and the falling snow made it even harder. Shrugging, he turned aside. Probably just a fox trying to sneak up on the chicken coop, he thought. Or a bird looking for a place to hide from the storm.
   Finally, Koppmeyer reached the door to the rectory. Here, on the south side, the drifts weren’t as high. He opened the door, squeezed his massive frame into the hallway, and bolted the door. At once he was enveloped in silence. The storm seemed far, far away. On the open hearth in the main room, a small fire was still burning, spreading warmth and comfort, and behind it a stairway led up to the housekeeper’s room. The priest turned to the right and walked through the main room on his way to his private quarters.
   On opening the door he was met by a sweet, rich fragrance. His mouth watered when he saw where it was coming from. On the table in the middle of his room was a clay bowl filled to the top with delicious doughnuts. Koppmeyer moved closer and touched them gently. They were still warm.
   The priest grinned. His dear housekeeper Magda had once again thought of everything. He had told her he would be in the church longer today to lend a hand with the renovations. He had taken a loaf of bread and a jug of wine along with him just in case, but the housekeeper knew that a man like Koppmeyer needed more to live on than that, so she had made the pastries for him and they were here now waiting for someone to come and redeem them!
   Andreas Koppmeyer lit a candle from the fire on the hearth and sat down at the table. He was delighted to see that the doughnuts were heavily coated with honey. He pulled the bowl over to him with both his huge hands, took one that was still warm, and bit into it, smacking his lips with pleasure.
   They were delicious.
   Chewing silently, the priest felt the warmth flowing back into his body. Soon he was done and reached for the next doughnut. He picked apart the softest one and pushed the steaming pieces into his mouth faster and faster. For a moment he thought he noticed an unpleasant taste, but it was at once covered by the sweet taste of the honey.
   After the sixth one, Koppmeyer finally had to give up. He peered down into the bowl one last time and saw just two doughnuts at the bottom. Sighing deeply, he rubbed his stomach, then more than satisfied, headed for the adjacent room, where he at once fell into a deep sleep.
   The pains, accompanied by a slightly nauseous feeling, announced themselves just before the first cock crow. Silently, Koppmeyer cursed his indulgence and sent a brief prayer to heaven, knowing that gluttony was one of the seven deadly sins. Most likely, Magda had intended the contents of the bowl to last a few days, but the doughnuts had simply been too delicious! Now God was punishing him right away with nausea and bodily aches and pains. Why did he have to start stuffing himself in the middle of the night? It served him right!
   As he was getting out of bed to relieve himself in the chamber pot that was placed at the ready for such occasions, the stomach pains intensified. Flashes of such pain coursed through his body that Father Koppmeyer had to grab the edge of the bed, moaning. He sat up and hobbled into the main room, where a pitcher of water stood on a little table. He sat down and drank the cool liquid in one long gulp in the hope of relieving the pain.
   On the way back to his room, a stabbing pain worse than anything he had ever experienced shot from his throat down to his stomach. Koppmeyer tried to shout, but the cry stuck in his throat. His tongue was like a stopper made of flesh plugging his airway. He sank to his knees while tongues of fire crept up his throat. He vomited mushy clumps, but the pain did not subside. On the contrary, it worsened until all Koppmeyer could do was to crawl around on all fours like a whipped dog. His legs suddenly gave out altogether. He tried to shout for the housekeeper, but the fire had long since consumed his throat.
   Slowly, the priest began to realize that these were no normal stomach pains and it wasn’t just that Magda had simply let the milk go bad. He could tell he was going to die. He lay there in abject misery.
   After some minutes of fear and despair, the priest reached a decision. With his last bit of strength, he leaned against the front door and pushed it open. Once again, the storm lashed his face, a wall of cold and icy thorns. The howling of the wind seemed to be mocking him.
   Following the tracks he had made some hours before that were still partially visible, he crept back to the church on all fours. Again and again, he had to stop and lie down when the pain got the better of him. Snow and ice crept under his cassock, his hands froze into shapeless clumps, and he lost all sense of time. One thing was uppermost in this mind: He had to reach the church!
   Finally, his head bumped against a wall, and after a few seconds he realized he had reached the portal of the St. Lawrence Church. With his last bit of strength, he forced the frozen stumps that had once been his hands into the crack in the door and pulled it open. Once inside, he was no longer even able to crawl on all fours. His legs kept collapsing under the weight of his heavy body, and it was only by crawling on his belly that he could manage the final short distance. He could feel how his inner organs were failing, little by little.
   When the priest reached the slab over the crypt, he passed his hands briefly over the relief of the woman below him. He caressed the weathered figure like a lover and finally laid his cheek on her face. Paralysis was climbing up his body from his legs, but before it reached his hands, the priest scratched a circle with the jagged nail of his right index finger into the layer of frost atop the gravestone. Then the tension receded from the powerful body and he collapsed. Once more, he tried to raise his head, but something was gripping him tightly.
   The last thing Andreas Koppmeyer felt was how his beard, his right ear, and the skin on his face slowly froze to the gravestone. Cold and silence enveloped him.

 

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 20 )
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  • Posted July 30, 2012

    I read Hangman's Daughter earlier this year, and ff you are a fa

    I read Hangman's Daughter earlier this year, and ff you are a fan of Umberto Eco's NAME OF THE ROSE or Josephine Tey's DAUGHTER OF TIME, then this book is right up your alley. The aspect of the author writing about a true historical figure that was also an ancestor was really interesting to me, and he did a great job bringing these characters to life. Am I really interested in the goings of of 17th century Bavaria? Not really, but I did enjoy the visit the author took me on. Some parts were kind on lengthy and perhaps superfluous, but that could just be my own American tastes--the book is translated (very well) from German. A nice read that kept me guessing to the end. The sequel had an interesting plot, but it was very reminiscent of Dan Brown--a group of Monks were after the Ultimate Templar treasure, a treasure that, once found, will change the course of the world. It takes place a few months after HD, in the winter, and the setting is finely integrated with the plot. The characters have changed, however. Simon isn't nearly as much of a dandy as he was in the first book, and I kind of missed that. The Hangman still knows everything, but he doesn't have that mysterious air he did previously. The novel was more thoroughly cleansed of inconsistencies, for which I am grateful for, but I missed all the same (it's like playing Where's Waldo with literature. Were bales of hay available before 1800? Nope, there were only haystacks...yet they are in the novel...). Still, it is an entertaining series that gets your brain moving, your blood pumping, and the villains are sadistically villainous. I will read on with this series because I know I'll be getting my money's worth of entertainment.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 1, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Oliver Pötzsch is brilliant!

    I loved this book every bit as much as I loved The Hangman's Daughter. Oliver Pötzsch is a fantastic writer. His books are suspenseful page-turners that keep you reading on and on. Full of twists and turns, The Dark Monk is a thrilling read. If you enjoyed The Hangman's Daughter, you will enjoy reading The Dark Monk. I cannot wait until Oliver Pötzsch's next two books are released! He is by far one of my favorite authors.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 14, 2012

    It's not "The DaVinci Code"

    There was some good plot devices in here, but there was a few too many which got tedious and some were highly implausible (i.e., someone who wants to make a permanent mark for another to find sometime in the future does NOT put the mark in a tree -- they burn, get chopped, blow down, die, get marked and scarred by other animals, etc). The author definitely doesn't understand how women think (but I've had this complaint about women authors). It seemed to be a poor imitation of "The DaVinci Code" with the characters following clues to find something important.

    It was still a good and an interesting read with a lot of historical information and there was lots to enjoy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2013

    intriguing and fun story

    Fun

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    As the first book was, this is also a fast read.

    The Dark Monk, #2 in the series is as great as the last one. I can't wait for the third one "The Beggar King" & the forth one "The Warlock" to reach eBook!! June, reader at large.

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  • Posted July 13, 2012

    Gripping Read!

    Can't wait for the next novel in the tale of the Hangman's Daughter!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Another good one

    Another well written mystery
    Cant wait for the thirf book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2012

    Highly recommended

    Both books, THE HANGMAN'S DAUGHTER and THE DARK MONK, ARE
    excellent books. Difficult to put down. I could not wait to
    get back to reading both books.

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  • Posted June 25, 2012

    I did not like this book very much, not nearly as much as I like

    I did not like this book very much, not nearly as much as I liked the first one. It had some problems. The author used a lot 20th-21st century cliches that seemed very ill placed in this book about 1600's Bavaria. Having a man "hitting" on a young woman conjures images of a bar scene instead of images of medieval Europe. One of the characters pulled out a box of matches. All the main characters faced extreme danger at some point, but were able to save themselves because they all had picked up some object just moments before because they thought they might need it. The storyline was very "DaVinci Code-ish" with the characters following clues to find a treasure. How the characters managed to follow the clues frequently seemed obscure to me. One of the clues was placed on a tree that miraculously survives for several hundred years since the clue's placement without the tree being chopped down, blown down or just plain falling down because of old age.

    The hangman's daughter, much more important in this book than the first, still didn't really seem like part of the story. And her character just seems so juvenile, petty and jealous to be liked even though the author tried to make her seem fiery and independent.

    It just wasn't that great of a story.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 24, 2012

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    Posted July 15, 2012

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    Posted June 28, 2012

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    Posted January 3, 2013

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    Posted December 11, 2012

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    Posted April 10, 2013

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    Posted March 18, 2013

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    Posted May 18, 2013

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    Posted August 1, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

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    Posted June 1, 2013

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