Overview

When you combine the sheer scale and range of digital information now available with a journalist’s "nose for news" and her ability to tell a compelling story, a new world of possibility opens up. With The Data Journalism Handbook, you’ll explore the potential, limits, and applied uses of this new and fascinating field.

This valuable handbook has attracted scores of contributors since the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation launched the project at ...

See more details below
The Data Journalism Handbook

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$12.99 List Price

Overview

When you combine the sheer scale and range of digital information now available with a journalist’s "nose for news" and her ability to tell a compelling story, a new world of possibility opens up. With The Data Journalism Handbook, you’ll explore the potential, limits, and applied uses of this new and fascinating field.

This valuable handbook has attracted scores of contributors since the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation launched the project at MozFest 2011. Through a collection of tips and techniques from leading journalists, professors, software developers, and data analysts, you’ll learn how data can be either the source of data journalism or a tool with which the story is told—or both.

  • Examine the use of data journalism at the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, the Guardian, and other news organizations
  • Explore in-depth case studies on elections, riots, school performance, and corruption
  • Learn how to find data from the Web, through freedom of information laws, and by "crowd sourcing"
  • Extract information from raw data with tips for working with numbers and statistics and using data visualization
  • Deliver data through infographics, news apps, open data platforms, and download links
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449330026
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/12/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 242
  • Sales rank: 1,225,061
  • File size: 22 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Jonathan Gray is Head of Community and Culture at the Open Knowledge Foundation (okfn.org), an award winning not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting open data, open content and the public domain in a wide variety of different fields. He founded several data journalism projects at the OKFN, including OpenSpending.org, which maps public spending around the world, and Europe's Energy, which puts EU energy targets into context. He is doing research in philosophy and the history of ideas at Royal Holloway, University of London. More about him can be found at jonathangray.org.

Lucy Chambers is a Community Coordinator at the Open Knowledge
Foundation. She works on the OKFN's OpenSpending.org project and
Spending Stories, a Knight News Challenge Winner 2011 - helping journalists build context around and fact check spending data. She also coordinates the data-driven-journalism activities of the
Foundation, running training sessions for journalists on how to find,
work with and present data.

Liliana Bounegru is project manager on Data Journalism at the European Journalism Centre (in Maastricht) and editor of DataDrivenJournalism.net, a collection of useful resources for those who want to get started with data journalism. She is a Research MA candidate in Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface;
For the Great Unnamed;
Contributors;
What This Book Is (And What It Isn’t);
Conventions Used in This Book;
Safari® Books Online;
How to Contact Us;
Chapter 1: Introduction;
1.1 What Is Data Journalism?;
1.2 Why Journalists Should Use Data;
1.3 Why Is Data Journalism Important?;
1.4 Some Favorite Examples;
1.5 Data Journalism in Perspective;
Chapter 2: In The Newsroom;
2.1 The ABC’s Data Journalism Play;
2.2 Data Journalism at the BBC;
2.3 How the News Apps Team at the Chicago Tribune Works;
2.4 Behind the Scenes at the Guardian Datablog;
2.5 Data Journalism at the Zeit Online;
2.6 How to Hire a Hacker;
2.7 Harnessing External Expertise Through Hackathons;
2.8 Following the Money: Data Journalism and Cross-Border Collaboration;
2.9 Our Stories Come As Code;
2.10 Kaas & Mulvad: Semi-Finished Content for Stakeholder Groups;
2.11 Business Models for Data Journalism;
Chapter 3: Case Studies;
3.1 The Opportunity Gap;
3.2 A Nine Month Investigation into European Structural Funds;
3.3 The Eurozone Meltdown;
3.4 Covering the Public Purse with OpenSpending.org;
3.5 Finnish Parliamentary Elections and Campaign Funding;
3.6 Electoral Hack in Realtime (Hacks/Hackers Buenos Aires);
3.7 Data in the News: WikiLeaks;
3.8 Mapa76 Hackathon;
3.9 The Guardian Datablog’s Coverage of the UK Riots;
3.10 Illinois School Report Cards;
3.11 Hospital Billing;
3.12 Care Home Crisis;
3.13 The Tell-All Telephone;
3.14 Which Car Model? MOT Failure Rates;
3.15 Bus Subsidies in Argentina;
3.16 Citizen Data Reporters;
3.17 The Big Board for Election Results;
3.18 Crowdsourcing the Price of Water;
Chapter 4: Getting Data;
4.1 A Five Minute Field Guide;
4.2 Your Right to Data;
4.3 Wobbing Works. Use It!;
4.4 Getting Data from the Web;
4.5 The Web as a Data Source;
4.6 Crowdsourcing Data at the Guardian Datablog;
4.7 How the Datablog Used Crowdsourcing to Cover Olympic Ticketing;
4.8 Using and Sharing Data: the Black Letter, the Fine Print, and Reality;
Chapter 5: Understanding Data;
5.1 Become Data Literate in Three Simple Steps;
5.2 Tips for Working with Numbers in the News;
5.3 Basic Steps in Working with Data;
5.4 The £32 Loaf of Bread;
5.5 Start With the Data, Finish With a Story;
5.6 Data Stories;
5.7 Data Journalists Discuss Their Tools of Choice;
5.8 Using Data Visualization to Find Insights in Data;
Chapter 6: Delivering Data;
6.1 Presenting Data to the Public;
6.2 How to Build a News App;
6.3 News Apps at ProPublica;
6.4 Visualization as the Workhorse of Data Journalism;
6.5 Using Visualizations to Tell Stories;
6.6 Different Charts Tell Different Tales;
6.7 Data Visualization DIY: Our Top Tools;
6.8 How We Serve Data at Verdens Gang;
6.9 Public Data Goes Social;
6.10 Engaging People Around Your Data;
Colophon;

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)