The Day I Lost My Superpowers

The Day I Lost My Superpowers

by Michael Escoffier, Kris Di Giacomo
     
 


Childhood is a magical time when even the stuff of the day-to-day is exciting and the ordinary often seems extraordinary. A part of this magic is that with just a little imagination, we all might be found to possess true superpowers!

This isn't the first or last book where a child delightedly discovers her own superpowers. But it may be just about the driest,

…  See more details below

Overview


Childhood is a magical time when even the stuff of the day-to-day is exciting and the ordinary often seems extraordinary. A part of this magic is that with just a little imagination, we all might be found to possess true superpowers!

This isn't the first or last book where a child delightedly discovers her own superpowers. But it may be just about the driest, funniest, and sweetest, where the discovery is handled with humor and charm.

One of the book's true pleasures is that it's a girl who discovers her own extraordinary abilities, and when her powers fail, as they must, she discovers them in her mom. All of which leads to a lovely intimacy between the two.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Sarah Harrison Smith
Di Giacomo's drawings…are sketchy and full of movement. As the supergirl swings, jumps, laughs, belly flops and at one point, bawls, Di Giacomo captures something refreshing and authentically childlike about her unselfconscious emotions. Escoffier keeps faith with his fearless protagonist, never wavering from telling the story from her perspective. He relies on Di Giacomo's visual narration to explain what's really going on…Escoffier rounds up the story with a warmhearted, love-affirming twist that could make The Day I Lost My Superpowers a contender for best book for Mother's Day…
From the Publisher

“Escoffier rounds up the story with a warmhearted, love-affirming twist that could make “The Day I Lost My Superpowers” a contender for best book for Mother’s Day; it turns out that superpowers run in the family.” -- New York Times

“In an import that is high on zest, a child and her blithe conviction that she has superpowers both take an abrupt tumble . . . Executed on spacious expanses of white or rich tan, they depict the ebullient child engaged in all sorts of delicious mayhem.” -- Kirkus Reviews

“Finding great superhero-themed books makes me especially happy. . . Big bold illustrations and a clever story make this a particularly super option for a Comic Book Month story-time.” -- My Friend Lucy

“I love picture books where the narrator is telling a different story than the pictures, and this one works particularly well. Escoffier has created a great protagonist here, a child who sees the potential for wonder everywhere, particularly in themselves. Just take a lot of imagination and anything at all is possible, even turning invisible. . . Funny, honest and a treat, this picture book will be celebrated by any child who owns their own cape.” -- Waking Brain Cells

“I just finished reading The Day I Lost My Superpowers and was grinning from ear to ear.” -- Smart Books for Smart Kids

"The book’s quiet quirkiness points toward its status as a French import, though the ending—the supergirl, injured, is fixed with a kiss by her equally super mom—is universal indeed." -- Booklist

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Our jaunty young narrator, convinced that she is “special,” works on developing her superpowers. At the same time, we amused readers see that those powers are less than “super.” As she states her ability to breathe under water (through a tube) or go through walls (with a hole) or walk on ceilings (upside down) we see her successes—and her failings—as her dog’s responses to her commands are not satisfactory. She wonders whether her parents know about her powers, until the day the “powers” desert her and she hurts her knee and cries. Her mom gives her a “magic kiss” to make her feel better. Perhaps her mom has superpowers too? Our heroine appears on the cover as a stylized youngster with a large head wearing black glasses and a one-piece outfit complete with black cape. We watch her misunderstandings of her activities with humor and sympathy. The page showing her three frustrating attempts to get her dog to obey her is typical of this story. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz; Ages 4 to 7.
School Library Journal
10/01/2014
PreS-Gr 1—A cape and mask-wearing youngster details her amazing powers, many of which will seem familiar to young readers. She can fly (the crayon-sketched artwork shows her jumping off her bed), make things disappear (an ability that works better with cupcakes than peas), communicate with other life forms (most successfully a plant, which obeys her command to "Freeze!"), and travel back in time (cuddled up in her mother's arms with pacifier in mouth and stuffed bunny in hand). The self-assured protagonist soars happily along, until one day she takes a tumble while playing in the backyard, and her superpowers desert her. Never fear, her mother comes running and gives her a kiss that soothes her wounded knee, inspiring the realization that "I think my mom has superpowers too!" Set against clean backdrops, the loose-lined illustrations brim with motion and energy. The narrator's face, drawn with a few deft lines, expresses an enchanting range of emotions, from sky-high exuberance to calculated mischievousness to tear-filled misery. The humorous interplay between text and artwork underscores the anything-is-possible mind-set of a young child. The upbeat ending, showing mother and daughter walking hand in hand, promises future feats of wonder as well as love.—Joy Fleishhacker, School Library Journal
Kirkus Reviews
2014-02-26
In an import that is high on zest, a child and her blithe conviction that she has superpowers both take an abrupt tumble. Sporting a black mask throughout in the simple crayon drawings, the self-confident young narrator describes how she learned to fly by launching herself from the bed. She can also make things (well, cupcakes at least) disappear and breathe under water—in a tub scene featuring a rib-tickling bit of mooning—as well as like special "powers." But despite previous spills aplenty, she declares with a childlike sense of permanence that her abilities are "Gone! Finished!" after some swooping on the end of a rope in the yard one day ends with a SPLAT! They don't vanish for long though, as when Mom rushes out with a "magic kiss" that makes most of the hurt go away, the child concludes that she "has superpowers too!" The illustrations will clue young readers in immediately that any powers here (aside, of course, from Mom's) are strictly in her head, creating a tension between text and subtext that, oddly, both celebrates and undercuts this kind of imaginary play. Executed on spacious expanses of white or rich tan, they depict the ebullient child engaged in all sorts of delicious mayhem. The narrator's buoyancy and quick recovery save this from turning into a dreary life lesson. (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592701445
Publisher:
Enchanted Lion Books
Publication date:
04/01/2014
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
155,290
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.80(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Michaël Escoffier: Michael Escoffier was born in France in 1970. Raised by a family of triceratops, he discovered his passion for writing and telling stories at a young age. He lives in Lyon with his wife and two children.

Kris Di Giacomo: Born in Brazil of American parents, Kris Di Giacomo is a popular children's book illustrator who has lived in France for a long time. After living in the US for a while she moved to France, where teaching English to young children and discovering French picture books were the triggers that led her

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