The Day My Runny Nose Ran Away

The Day My Runny Nose Ran Away

5.0 1
by Jason Eaton, Ethan Long
     
 

One morning, Jason wakes up to find something missing-his nose. According to a note left on his pillow, the nose ran off in protest. Jason follows his renegade schnoz all the way to Nose Island, where he discovers that it has become king and is leading a nose revolution! Will Jason succeed in foiling the noses' plan? More important, will he convince his nose to get…  See more details below

Overview

One morning, Jason wakes up to find something missing-his nose. According to a note left on his pillow, the nose ran off in protest. Jason follows his renegade schnoz all the way to Nose Island, where he discovers that it has become king and is leading a nose revolution! Will Jason succeed in foiling the noses' plan? More important, will he convince his nose to get back on his face? Don't count on it-only the unexpected happens in this fabulously funny fantasy by a talented new author-and-illustrator team.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Caldecott medalist Egielski's artwork outshines the text in this inventive book about the Statue of Liberty climbing down "from her sacred place" and walking from New York to San Francisco. She waves to citizen farmers, engineers, children of immigrants and cheering cowboys along the way. As she gazes at the Golden Gate Bridge, a boy delivers messages to the homesick statue from the citizens of New York ("Please come back!"), and when Liberty returns to her harbor, New Yorkers treat her to a ticker tape parade. The concept is interesting, but DiPucchio's (Bed Hogs) phrases at times seem shoehorned to fit the strict meter and the co-opting of familiar song lyrics (Liberty is "in search of amber waves of grain," and journeys from "sea to shining sea" and "travels 'cross the fruited plain") contribute to a sense of trumped-up sentimentality. However, Egielski, like Pygmalion, brings the statue to life. Like Paul Bunyan, Liberty towers over her surroundings as she strides across the country, reacting to all that she sees, always retaining her stately grace. A concluding author's note lists kid-pleasing facts about the statue (e.g., she has 25-foot feet that "would require sandals in an astounding size 879!"). Ages 4-7. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-Who "nose" what would happen if a body part suddenly decided to leave for a better life? Fed up with Jason's careless abuse ("You wiped me up and down your lousy sleeve-"), his nose, Montague, deserts overnight, leaving the boy with odorless food, jeers from his classmates, and slipping glasses. His grandfather tells him to "hitch a ride with the Ship of Lost Things" to Nose Island, where he discovers that his own renegade nose not only rules the current community, but also plans to "conquer the world." Eaton's last pages provide the perfect unexpected plot resolution, while Long's humorous, bold, full-page cartoon art frames Jason's lengthy first-person narrative. A brightly colored fantasy for younger readers.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
One day a most peculiar thing happened to Jason: Montague, his nose, left him a note on his pillow informing him that the mistreatment had to stop (blowing on scratchy paper towels, squishing against windows) and he took off. Jason can�t smell, his glasses keep slipping, and a sneeze is just plain nasty. His mom is unsympathetic (wiped his nose on his sleeve too many times) and his class stares and calls him No-Nose. Sent home from school, his grandfather recalls how the same thing happened to him, from sticking his nose in other people�s business, and he had to go to Nose Island to find it. He tells Jason to hitch a ride with the Ship of Lost Things; while onboard, the ship captain tells him never to take his nose for granted. When he lands on Nose Island, Jason discovers his nose has become king of the island. Montague orders a feast by throwing favorite foods on a bonfire to make delicious smells for the noses. Then he informs Jason of his plan for noses to take over the world. Taken prisoner, Jason manages to escape—without his nose—though when he returns to school, everyone there is noseless, too. Seems Montague has convinced all the noses in the world to join him. The first-person voice plays up the absurdity and the cartoon art matches the wacky story. A great variety of noses abounds, including the wooden one on the captain; the schnozzes and the color-saturated pages will attract readers. Unfortunately, while the idea is funny, the ending takes a nosedive, abruptly falling flat on its face. (Picture book. 5-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525470137
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
09/16/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.36(w) x 11.32(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Jason Eaton is the editor of thefreedonian.com, a Web site devoted entirely to humor.

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The Day My Runny Nose Ran Away 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My son and I have already read this book 5 times and we have only had it for a few days. He loves the funny story, the pictures are beautiful. It is a smart, witty and laugh-out-loud story that should not be missed. I laugh when I read it out loud to him! GET THIS BOOK.