BN.com Gift Guide

The Deaf Musicians

Overview


Poor Lee! He used to be a jazzman who could make the piano go yimbatimba- TANG—zang-zang. But now he's lost his hearing, and the bandleader had to let him go.

So Lee goes to a school for the deaf to learn sign language. There, he meets Max, who used to play the sax. Riding the subway to class, they start signing about all the songs they love. A bass player named Rose joins in and soon they've got a little sign language band. And in no time ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (29) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $8.34   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview


Poor Lee! He used to be a jazzman who could make the piano go yimbatimba- TANG—zang-zang. But now he's lost his hearing, and the bandleader had to let him go.

So Lee goes to a school for the deaf to learn sign language. There, he meets Max, who used to play the sax. Riding the subway to class, they start signing about all the songs they love. A bass player named Rose joins in and soon they've got a little sign language band. And in no time they're performing for audiences in the subway, night after night.

Living legend and Kennedy Center honoree Pete Seeger, renowned poet Paul DuBois Jacobs, and Coretta Scott King honor winner R. Gregory Christie present a jazzy riff on the power of music, overcoming obstacles, and all the different ways to hear the world. So, who will listen to a deaf musician? Everyone!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Janet L. Rose
Lee loses his hearing and, therefore, loses his job playing piano in a band, but Lee meets Max, who is also deaf and plays the sax. Together they play music with their hands as they ride the subway. A woman sees them and joins in by playing an upright bass. The three deaf people recruit an interpreter to be their singer and people on the subway start to watch and move in rhythm. Regardless of the medium, whether deaf or hearing, on key or off, Pete Seeger, who often performed while interpreters signed his songs, said that "The real music is in people joining together." He loved to hear people sing along during his concerts. The story is a lesson in acceptance and joy and working together. It is also about pursuing your dreams regardless of what other people think. The story could start a unit on deafness, sign language, coping with life changes, and communicating through the universal language of music.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Jazz! It's all about the rhythm and the sounds, musicians in conversation answering each other with notes and riffs instead of words. But what happens when one member of the band can't hear the notes anymore? Through this rhythmic story, readers meet Lee, who loses his hearing and is asked to leave his band. Luckily, he discovers a whole new world of music that exists in the mind and heart at a local school for the deaf. Christie's snazzy style matches perfectly with the book's vivacity. The expressive faces and bold use of color make the story sing. This is a great read-aloud that begs for enthusiastic performance and audience participation. Both uplifting and inclusive, it is a celebration of music and resilience.-Genevieve Gallagher, Murray Elementary School, Charlottesville, VA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
After losing his hearing, a piano man finds new musical life. Lee plays piano with a combo at a jazz club. One night, his bandmates notice that he's not hearing their notes; he's afraid to admit that he's losing his hearing. Eventually, the combo has to let him go. On the subway, Lee spots an ad for a school for the deaf. It's a very cool place, and he finds he loves sign language. He and his new friends from the school have jam sessions, using sign language instead of instruments. They practice regularly; when they add a singer named Ellie, they've got a hot new combo that entertains commuters in the subway station. Lee's happy again, as a deaf musician. Seeger and Jacobs' hep narrative is studded with phonic gems ("Bomp," "Phip," "Doodle-bop-bop"), and Christie's colorful paintings have a strong 1950s feel. An unusual story, both stylish and uplifting. (author note) (Picture book. 4-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780399243165
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/5/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 572,056
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.40 (w) x 8.24 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)