The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

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Overview

In this classic Puritan work, John Owen examines the atonement of Christ in a comprehensive and clear fashion. 'The Death of Death in the Death of Christ' has long been regarded by many as the best treatment of the Atonement ever written.
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The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

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Overview

In this classic Puritan work, John Owen examines the atonement of Christ in a comprehensive and clear fashion. 'The Death of Death in the Death of Christ' has long been regarded by many as the best treatment of the Atonement ever written.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781482055351
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 1/25/2013
  • Pages: 276
  • Sales rank: 1,285,368
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Meet the Author

John Owen (1616-1683) was an English Nonconformist church leader, theologian, and academic administrator at the University of Oxford. On 29 April he preached before the Long Parliament. In this sermon, and in his Country Essay for the Practice of Church Government, which he appended to it, his tendency to break away from Presbyterianism to the Independent or Congregational system is seen. Like John Milton, he saw little to choose between "new presbyter" and "old priest." He became pastor at Coggeshall in Essex, with a large influx of Flemish tradesmen. In March 1651, Cromwell, as Chancellor of Oxford University, gave him the deanery of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, and made him Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University in September 1652; in both offices he succeeded the Presbyterian, Edward Reynolds. During his eight years of official Oxford life Owen showed himself a firm disciplinarian, thorough in his methods, though, as John Locke testifies, the Aristotelian traditions in education underwent no change. With Philip Nye he unmasked the popular astrologer, William Lilly, and in spite of his share in condemning two Quakeresses to be whipped for disturbing the peace, his rule was not intolerant. Anglican services were conducted here and there, and at Christ Church itself the Anglican chaplain remained in the college. While little encouragement was given to a spirit of free inquiry, Puritanism at Oxford was not simply an attempt to force education and culture into "the leaden moulds of Calvinistic theology." Owen, unlike many of his contemporaries, was more interested in the New Testament than in the Old. During his Oxford years he wrote Justitia Divina, an exposition of the dogma that God cannot forgive sin without an atonement; Communion with God, Doctrine of the Saints' Perseverance, his final attack on Arminianism; Vindiciae Evangelicae, a treatise written by order of the Council of State against Socinianism as expounded by John Biddle; On the Mortification of Sin in Believers, an introspective and analytic work; Schism, one of the most readable of all his writings; Of Temptation, an attempt to recall Puritanism to its cardinal spiritual attitude from the jarring anarchy of sectarianism and the pharisaism which had followed on popularity and threatened to destroy the early simplicity.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 8, 2011

    Terrible Formatting

    This is a review of the Nook version only.

    Text is too large and cannot be resized. Will not allow font changes either. If you want this book for your Nook, avoid this one and go with the slightly more expensive version.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2012

    I got the sample

    You CAN change the format something must be wrong with her nook

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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