Death of Mr. Love

Overview

In a family of storytellers, there was one tale never told ... "Call this story fiction if you want, but you must tell it because it is true, and at its heart is that murder of forty years ago which people in India still remember ... "

The Death of Mr. Love, a novel inspired by a true story where the victim became a villain and the killer became a hero, offers a rare and fascinating insight into the psychosexual undercurrents of Indian life.

...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (25) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $4.50   
  • Used (22) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.50
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(57)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
9.13 X 5.98 X 1.50 inches; 432 pages

Ships from: Victor, MT

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$24.95
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(103)

Condition: New
New York 2004 First U.S. edition, hardcover, New in dj, New A novel inspired by a true story in which the victim became a villain and the killer became a hero. The children of ... the victim in this story return to the scene of the crime (India) to exact revenge. From the author of THE CULT OF ECSTASY the CYBERGYPSIES and other popular works. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Shingletown, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(149)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In a family of storytellers, there was one tale never told ... "Call this story fiction if you want, but you must tell it because it is true, and at its heart is that murder of forty years ago which people in India still remember ... "

The Death of Mr. Love, a novel inspired by a true story where the victim became a villain and the killer became a hero, offers a rare and fascinating insight into the psychosexual undercurrents of Indian life.

The reverberations from the notorious Nanavati society murder in 1950s Bombay — the fatal consequence of an affair between an Indian playboy and his married English lover — were so great that they reached the offices of Prime Minister Nehru and changed the face of the Indian justice system irrevocably. What is not known — has never been known — is that a second, connected crime, so cruel that it destroyed the lives of two women, went unreported and has remained unpunished. Until now.

In present-day London the women's children unexpectedly meet forty years after their idyllic childhood in India. Driven by grief, anger, or a deeper emotion they are unwilling to confront, they return to India to uncover the mystery of the crime that caused their mothers' suffering and exact their cold revenge. But in the bazaars of today's Bombay, a city racked and burned by communal riots, their adversary still enjoys huge power, and the friends soon find themselves in real, terrifying danger.

Spanning two continents and encompassing the secrets of fifty years, The Death of Mr. Love fuses myth and murder, fact and fiction. It is a tale of stories that "begin before their beginnings, and continue beyond their ends."

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This debut novel (originally published in 2002 in Britain) retells an actual murder case that scandalized India during the 1950s. "Mr. Love" is Prem Ahuja, a notorious high-society playboy who specializes in seducing married women-like Sylvia, the stunningly beautiful English wife of a well-respected Indian naval commander. Predictably, her husband discovers the affair and in a pique of anger murders the cavalier lover; he is sentenced to life in prison. But Sinha proposes that Mr. Love has ruined another woman as well, Sylvia's best friend, Sybil-only Sybil's ruination comes in the form of blackmail. Fast-forward 40 years to London, and Bhalu and Phoebe, the children of Sylvia and Sybil, are reunited. Together they attempt to identify the blackmailer, whose identity was never made public. Using two narrative lines, Sinha alternates between the present day and the 1950s. What could have been an intriguing storyline quickly becomes hard work, as the reader strives to keep up with the ever-changing decades. An optional choice for collections where Indian fiction is popular.-Marika Zemke, West Bloomfield Twp. P.L., MI Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A masterfully told story of an old murder with a long reach moves seamlessly from the past to the present, from India to England, as a middle-aged Indian tries to learn the truth about his mother and a friend's past. Now based in England, the Indian-born Sinha (The Cybergypsies: A True Tale of Lust, War, and Betrayal on the Electronic Frontier, 1999) memorably evokes the contrasting textures of both societies in a first novel ostensibly about a true crime in 1950s Bombay-but in fact more about his protagonist's own life. It's 1998, and narrator Bhalu, a bookseller in Lewes, is summoned to London by his 76-year-old mother, Maya, who tells him she's dying. In Bombay, Maya had been a noted storyteller and scriptwriter for the film industry; but as a young student, Bhalu was arrested in a police raid, and once Maya secured his release, sent him to England, shortly following there herself. Now, Maya, who believes that lives are continually unfolding and that stories never really end, claims she left India for Bhalu's sake. Their leaving seems also strangely connected to the murder of one "Mr. Love," a famous Bombay philanderer. Recalling his childhood in Bombay and the Amborna Hills, where he first met English Phoebe and her mother Sybil, a close friend of Maya's, Bhalu also ruefully details his failures as a husband and as a filmmaker. Back in India he and Phoebe were close childhood friends who would explore the local countryside while Maya helped Sybil recover from an unspecified illness. Later, after Maya's death, Bhalu learns real story about Sybil when Phoebe, unmarried and curiously elusive, contacts him suggesting that he read Sybil's notebooks. From them he learns of Sybil's affairwith "Mr. Love," her botched abortion, and the mysterious blackmailer who not only destroyed Sybil but also drove Maya and Bhalu to England. Returning to India to track down the blackmailer, Bhalu will finally understand both his own past, as well his mother's and Sybil's. A stylish, page-turning debut.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060562465
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/2/2004
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.29 (d)

Meet the Author

Indra Sinha was born in India and educated at Mayo College, Rajasthan, and Pembroke College, Cambridge. He lives in Sussex, England, and is a full-time writer.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

The Death of Mr. Love
A Novel

Chapter One

Silver Ganesh

Ambona, 1958

My mother, Maya, who was a storyteller -- her name, aptly, means "illusion" -- used to say that writers have a special responsibility to the world because they have the power to change it. They must be careful how they tell their tales, and to whom, for storytelling is an act whose effects are incalculable and endless.

These are things I remember from my childhood, those evenings of forty years ago in India, when she was surrounded by her clever friends -- artists, musicians, filmmakers -- in our drawing room full of candles (kept for power cuts, but used regardless) and ... in my mind's eye I see bottles of wine, but this is the memory playing tricks. In the fifties there were no Indian wines and Maya's guests had to do their merrymaking with whisky distilled in Bangalore and obtained, on my father's account, from the naval stores.

Music, laughter, intense discussion, this is what I remember, my mother moving round the room in a silk sari that changed color as the light caught it, putting a record on the gramophone, pulling a book off a shelf to show someone, holding a match to an incense stick, calling to Yelliya, our surly south Indian cook, to bring the food. Dinner was rarely served before midnight. How Maya loved those gatherings. She wore a large red kumkum dot in the middle of her forehead and this seemed to accentuate her eyes, which were dark and huge and shone with excitement as she talked. I would creep out of bed and hang, half hidden in a curtain, watching and listening. I was always caught, of course, and dragged in my pajamas before the company to be scolded and petted and praised, after which I would be allowed to sit for a while, with a glass of lemon squash, listening to the conversation.

One night I particularly remember. My mother was talking to a bear of a man with a beard that lay like a bib upon his chest. He wore the long muslin kurta that is practically a uniform for Bengali intellectuals. A twiglike pipe stuck from his hairy mouth. His name was Babul Roy and I remember thinking how funny it was that they called him Bubbles. Bubbles was in those days an arty and rather unsuccessful film director and Maya was eager to tell him about her new story. (It was her screenplay period, cinema was exciting, Satyajit Ray had just released Pather Panchali, two of her scripts had recently made it to the screen.)

"How should we behave," my mother was saying, "when we don't know what the result of our actions will be? Not even don't know, can't know?"

"You won't catch me with this bait again," said Bubbles, sucking on his pipe in a way that made it chuckle in sympathy. "This is your favorite impossible question."

Catch with this bait ... ? Did Bubbles really say that? It seems unlikely, but is what comes to mind -- my eight-year-old brain was obsessed with fishing. In any case, Maya got what she wanted, which was not an answer, but the chance to launch into her plot.

"Let's make you the hero of the story," she said. "One day yo u leave your house and, outside, find a street boy being beaten by two policemen. They have tied his wrists to your railings and are thrashing him with their batons. He's the same age as Bhalu, but a lot smaller. He's howling. His dirty face is streaked with tears. When they see you, the policemen stop. You ask what the hell they're doing. They say they are interrogating him because they suspect he may be about to break into your house. You, decent soul, are outraged. You order them to release him. They grumble that people like you are the first to complain about crime, and now you're stopping them doing their job. Ten rupees shuts them up."

"Ten rupees? I wouldn't give those bahinchods ten annas," said Bubbles.

"Not even ten pice!" I shouted. It was a horrible story. I felt sorry for the boy. I could feel the blows of the policemen's sticks landing on my head and back. Bubbles, who had forgotten I was listening, was mortified. He said to me, "Hey, Bhalu, champ, you forget what I just said."

"He already knows that word," said my mother. "You should hear his grandfather. My God! Every second syllable!"

My father's parents had come down from Kumharawa to visit us in Bombay. This was before we moved to the hills. The old man complained about every bahinchod thing. The fruit, the fish, the vegetables. He quarreled with the bahinchod dhobi and the twice-bahinchod milkman. This isn't the right moment to tell the story about the cow. After they left, I missed him horribly, and Maya said she had forgotten how coarse village ways were.

"So, anyway," she resumed, "you take the boy inside, and tell your servants to feed him. They, of course, think you've gone mad."

Bubbles nodded. I was fascinated by the way his pipe shot out little cannonballs of smoke, like the engines that chuffed through Ambona station.

"He eats like the starving animal he is. You ask him about his family, life on the street, but he won't talk. He doesn't trust you. What he does do is ask you for money. You give him five rupees. After he leaves, you find that your silver Ganesh statue is missing."

"And the servants say, 'See, I to ld you so' ... "

"Your servants urge you to report the theft," said Maya.

"Otherwise suspicion falls on them."

"You're angry, of course, about the statue, the boy's contempt for your kindness, but mostly with yourself for being bourgeois enough to think that one decent act can erase a lifetime's brutality. Reluctantly, you go to the police station ... "

The Death of Mr. Love
A Novel
. Copyright © by Indra Sinha. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)