The Death of the USS Thresher: The Story Behind History's Deadliest Submarine Disaster

Overview

On the morning of April 10, 1963, the world's most advanced submarine was on a test dive off the New England coast when she sent a message to a support ship a thousand feet above her on the surface: experiencing minor problem . . . have positive angle . . . attempting to blow . . . Then came the sounds of air under pressure and a garbled message: . . . test depth . . . Last came the eerie sounds that experienced navy men knew from World War II: the sounds of a submarine breaking up and compartments ...
See more details below
Paperback (First Edition)
$13.86
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$14.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $3.84   
  • New (7) from $5.03   
  • Used (11) from $3.84   
Death of the USS Thresher: The Story Behind History's Deadliest Submarine Disaster

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$11.49
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$13.99 List Price

Overview

On the morning of April 10, 1963, the world's most advanced submarine was on a test dive off the New England coast when she sent a message to a support ship a thousand feet above her on the surface: experiencing minor problem . . . have positive angle . . . attempting to blow . . . Then came the sounds of air under pressure and a garbled message: . . . test depth . . . Last came the eerie sounds that experienced navy men knew from World War II: the sounds of a submarine breaking up and compartments collapsing.When she first went to sea in April of 1961, the U.S. nuclear submarine Thresher was the most advanced submarine at sea, built specifically to hunt and kill Soviet submarines. In The Death of the USS Thresher, renowned naval and intelligence consultant Norman Polmar recounts the dramatic circumstances surrounding her implosion, which killed all 129 men on board, in history's first loss of a nuclear submarine. This revised edition of Polmar's 1964 classic is based on interviews with the Thresher's first command officer, other submarine officers, and the designers of the submarine. Polmar provides recently declassified information about the submarine, and relates the loss to subsequent U.S. and Soviet nuclear submarine sinkings, as well as to the escape and rescue systems developed by the Navy in the aftermath of the disaster. The Death of the USS Thresher is a must-read for the legions of fans who enjoyed the late Peter Maas's New York Times best-seller The Terrible Hours.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Submarines and underwater navigation have long interested people, even some of the most dyed-in-the-wool landlubbers. One worthy "new" book about submarines is The Death of the U.S.S. Thresher. It was written in 1964. This new edition has been updated by its author, Norman Polmar, to incorporate information that has been declassified since the book was first published."-- AP Newswires
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781592283927
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/1/2004
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 480,692
  • Product dimensions: 5.64 (w) x 8.06 (h) x 0.64 (d)

Meet the Author

Norman Polmar has been a consultant to senior officials of the U.S. Navy and Department of Defense, and has directed studies for U.S. and foreign aerospace and shipbuilding firms. He was a member of the Secretary of the Navy's Research Advisory Committee (NRAC) and the steering group for the Secretary's analysis of the Falklands War. For four years-as an employee of the Northrop Corporation-he worked for the Navy's Deep Submergence Systems Project (DSSP), which developed advanced escape and rescue systems in the wake of the Thresher disaster. He is the author of more than thirty books on naval, aviation, and intelligence projects. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Preface
1. The Thresher
2. A Brief Career
3. In the Yard
4. The Last Cruise
5. Inside the Thresher
6. The Early Search
7. Finding the Thresher
8. The Inquiry
9. A Sequence of Events
10. Aftermath

Appendices
A. An announcement that the Thresher is "overdue and presumed missing."
B. The first press briefing of the Thresher disaster
C. Death certificate for the 129 Navymen and Civilians aboard the Thresher on April 10, 1963
D. Report of the Thresher Court of Inquiry
E. Statement announcing the finding of the Thresher's remains
F. The 129 Navymen and Civilians who died in the Thresher

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 27, 2010

    Thorough analysis of the Navy's first nuclear disaster

    On April 10, 1963, the USS Thresher, lead ship in the US Navy's newest class of nuclear attack submarines, was undergoing a series of deep diving tests as part of a post-overhaul cruise. She never resurfaced, and the loss of the Thresher and the 129 men on board remains the Navy's worst submarine disaster.

    Norman Polmar dissects the events leading up to the Thresher's last dive, the frantic initial search for the missing sub, the month's long search to locate the wreck in 8,400 feet of water, and summarizes possible scenarios that might have caused the loss. Polmar is in a unique position to do so, having worked on the Navy's Deep Submergence Systems Project and other submarine-related defense projects for a number of years. Polmar also examines subsequent nuclear submarine disasters, including the only other US sub lost, the USS Scorpion in 1968, and a number of Soviet/Russian subs.

    The only weak spot in the book is that the men behind the machines are almost one-dimensional, only the commanders getting more than a passing mention. Still, an important book that lays out the lessons the Navy learned from the Thresher and Scorpion disasters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2001

    Intense,Captivating an Emotional masterpiece!

    I could not put this book down.You can't help but feel like it's happening now.Once you read it you won't forget it.A great tribute to the 129 men lost at sea,It will fill you with pride and patriotisim.THANK YOU NORMAN POLMAR !!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)