The Decline of American Medicine: Where Have All the Doctors Gone?

Overview

Why is it so difficult to find a good doctor, and see the doctor when you have a problem? Why are you told to "go to the emergency room?" Why is your "doctor" a nurse practitioner? The U.S. health care system, heralded as the finest in the world, has been in decline for a number of years. Here are the explanations for the decline in availability of primary health care, its increasing cost, and the increasingly impersonal care encountered by the patient. Dr. Rosenblum, chosen by his peers as a leading physician in...
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Overview

Why is it so difficult to find a good doctor, and see the doctor when you have a problem? Why are you told to "go to the emergency room?" Why is your "doctor" a nurse practitioner? The U.S. health care system, heralded as the finest in the world, has been in decline for a number of years. Here are the explanations for the decline in availability of primary health care, its increasing cost, and the increasingly impersonal care encountered by the patient. Dr. Rosenblum, chosen by his peers as a leading physician in his community, clarifies the many issues contributing to deterioration of health care. He employs his experience as an internist, and interviews with key individuals involved in health policy and health care delivery. He proposes solutions to halt the disintegration of primary health care, which if restored to its former position of prominence, would reverse the downhill course of medical care in the United States.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780595284191
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/28/2003
  • Edition number: 0
  • Pages: 124
  • Product dimensions: 6.18 (w) x 9.12 (h) x 0.35 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2003

    Decline of American Medicine: Where Have All the Doctors Gone?

    ¿Decline¿ is a must for understanding exactly how American health care got so expensive and so frustrating for so many. I had only the vaguest idea of why my HMO essentially ignores me until Michael Rosenblum recounted the history of medical care financing in this country. The book is not, however, a pollyannaish paean to some mythical golden age, but a judicious assessment of what we have lost, what we have gained, and how they might be put together in an excellent future health care system. Anyone who even thinks about health care reform needs to read this reflective philosophical meditation before taking the first step. Rosenblum summarizes ¿ A long-term relationship with an experienced primary care M.D., unfettered by relations to managed care companies or government agencies, provides the patient with the best chance for optimal results from treatment at the lowest possible cost. Intrinsic to the primary care role is the development of real skill in knowing when to send the patient down a high-tech, costly, specialist-treatment cascade, and when simple comfort measures will suffice. This may be ¿rationing¿ but we don¿t think of it that way. I would call it `good care¿.¿ I think it would be great for society if one again the young people I see on campus could feel enthusiastic about pursing a career in medicine. It would be great for all of us if we knew the money we spent on health care went for prevention and treatment of illness rather than ignoring and avoiding patients, and then keeping track of the waste of the resources.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2003

    Decline of American Medicine: Where Have All the Doctors Gone?

    ¿Decline¿ is a must for understanding how American health care got so expensive. I had only a vague idea of why my HMO ignores me until Rosenblum charted the changes in health care financing. No Pollyannaish paean to a mythical golden age, this is a judicious assessment of what¿s been lost and gained, and how to build a functional health care system. Advocates of health care reform must read this reflective philosophical meditation. Rosenblum concludes ¿ A long-term relationship with an experienced primary care M.D., unfettered by relations to managed care companies or government agencies, provides the patient with the best chance for optimal results from treatment at the lowest possible cost. Intrinsic to the primary care role is the development of real skill in knowing when to send the patient down a high-tech, costly, specialist-treatment cascade, and when simple comfort measures will suffice. This may be ¿rationing¿ but we don¿t think of it that way. I would call it `good care¿.¿ It would be great if students again felt enthusiastic about medical careers and if money spent on health care went for prevention and treatment rather than avoiding patients then keeping track of the wasted resources.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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