The Deep Range

( 1 )

Overview

This story takes place about 100 years in the future, when the earth's population is fed principally from the sea--on whale products or from plankton farms. Its hero is Walter Franklin, a grounded space engineer now assigned to a submarine patrol tending the whale herds.

DEEP RANGE vibrates with exciting adventures of the mysterious sea: a fight with a giant squid at 12,000 feet, a search for a great sea serpent, and a heroic rescue of a ...

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Overview

This story takes place about 100 years in the future, when the earth's population is fed principally from the sea--on whale products or from plankton farms. Its hero is Walter Franklin, a grounded space engineer now assigned to a submarine patrol tending the whale herds.

DEEP RANGE vibrates with exciting adventures of the mysterious sea: a fight with a giant squid at 12,000 feet, a search for a great sea serpent, and a heroic rescue of a damaged submarine--all vividly and plausibly portrayed.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345147530
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/10/1987
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback

Meet the Author

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Clarke is widely revered as one of the most influential science fiction writers of the 20th century, esteemed alongside Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein, a trio known informally as the “Big Three.” Before his death in 2008, he authored more than 100 novels, novellas, and short story collections and laid the groundwork for science fiction as we know it today. Combining scientific knowledge and visionary literary aptitude, Clarke’s work explored the implications of major scientific discoveries in astonishingly inventive and mystical settings.

Clarke’s short stories and novels have won numerous Hugo and Nebula Awards, have been translated into more than 30 languages, and have sold millions of copies worldwide. Several of his books, including 2001: A Space Odyssey and 2010: Odyssey II, have been adapted into films that still stand as classic examples of the genre. Without a doubt, Arthur C. Clarke is one of the most important voices in contemporary science fiction literature.

Biography

Widely considered the greatest science fiction writer of all time, Arthur C. Clarke turned his formidable technical knowledge and lively creative imagination into an amazing career that spanned the fields of literature, invention, futurology, and entertainment.

Born in 1917 in the seaside town of Minehad in Somerset, England, Clarke developed an early interest in both science and its literary sister, speculative science fiction. After secondary school he moved to London and joined the British Interplanetary Society, where he contributed articles to the Society's bulletin. During WWII, he joined the RAF, working in the experimental trials of Ground Controlled Approach Radar, the forerunner of today's air traffic control systems. (This experience inspired his only non-science fiction novel, 1963's Glide Path.) In a technical paper written in 1945 for the UK periodical Wireless World, he set out the principles of satellite communication that would lead to the global satellite systems in use today.

After WWII, he attended King's College, London, on scholarship and received first class honors in Physics and Mathematics. He sold his first sci-fi story to Astounding Science Fiction magazine in May of 1946. From that point on, he never stopped writing. Some of his more notable works include Childhood's End, Rendezvous with Rama, and The Fountains of Paradise.

In 1964, Clarke was approached by film auteur Stanley Kubrick to collaborate on a science fiction movie script. The material chosen for adaptation was Clarke's 1948 short story "The Sentinel," an eerie tale about the discovery of an extraterrestrial artifact. Over the next four years, he expanded the story into a full-length novel, while simultaneously writing the screenplay with Kubrick. In 1968, both versions of 2001: A Space Odyssey debuted to great acclaim. Clarke also worked in television -- as a consultant during the CBS news coverage of the Apollo 12 and 15 space missions and as creator of two distinguished series, "Arthur C. Clarke's Mysterious World" and "Arthur C. Clarke's World of Strange Powers."

In 1954, Clarke visited Sri Lanka (then called Ceylon). He fell in love with the country and settled there in 1956, founding a guided diving service and continuing to produce his astonishing books and articles. On March 19, 2008, he died in Sri Lanka at the age of 90, leaving behind an impressive literary legacy and millions of bereft fans.

Good To Know

Clarke shared an Oscar nomination with Stanley Kubrick for the screenplay of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Clarke was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1998.

In 1986, the Science Fiction Writers of America bestowed on Clarke the title of Grand Master.

At home in Sri Lanka, Clarke survived the deadly Boxing Day Tsunami of 2004 that caused the deaths of more than a quarter million people.

Clarke was an expert scuba diver and in 1956 founded a guided diving service in Sri Lanka, then known as Ceylon.

In Profiles of the Future (1962), Clarke set forth his "Three Laws," provocative observations on science, science fiction, and society:

  • "When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong."
  • "The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible."
  • "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
  • Read More Show Less
      1. Date of Birth:
        December 16, 1917
      2. Place of Birth:
        Minehead, Somerset, England
      1. Date of Death:
        March 19, 2008
      2. Place of Death:
        Sri Lanka
      1. Education:
        1948, King's College, London, first-class honors in Physics and Mathematics

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    Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
    • Anonymous

      Posted November 17, 2005

      Where's the plot?

      Arthur C. Clarke is widely recognized as one of the Grandmasters of Science Fiction. Yet, during the last few months as I have read some of his older works, I have come to the conclusion that his success is derived mostly from the ideas he presents in his stories, and not from the stories themselves. Perhaps that is why Clarke's short fiction is by far more satisfying than most of his novels, since his ideas are delivered without any plot or character development mucking up the works. The Deep Range is about an ex-astronaut who is able to find peace working in Earth's seas. The plot then dissolves into merely a series of events strung together with loose ends left hanging everywhere. Characters are not developed in the least, which is a typical and valid criticism of Clarke. Clarke's prose is more readable and literate than most science-fiction authors, but it is quite dry at times, making reading a chore. I wouldn't suggest this book to anyone. There are many better alternatives available, by this author, and others.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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