The Democracy Sourcebook

Overview

The Democracy Sourcebook offers a collection of classic writings and contemporary scholarship on democracy, creating a book that can be used by undergraduate and graduate students in a wide variety of courses, including American politics, international relations, comparative politics, and political philosophy. The editors have chosen substantial excerpts from the essential theorists of the past, including Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, Alexis de Tocqueville, and the authors of The Federalist Papers; ...

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Overview

The Democracy Sourcebook offers a collection of classic writings and contemporary scholarship on democracy, creating a book that can be used by undergraduate and graduate students in a wide variety of courses, including American politics, international relations, comparative politics, and political philosophy. The editors have chosen substantial excerpts from the essential theorists of the past, including Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, Alexis de Tocqueville, and the authors of The Federalist Papers; they place them side by side with the work of such influential modern scholars as Joseph Schumpeter, Adam Przeworski, Seymour Martin Lipset, Samuel P. Huntington,
Ronald Dworkin, and Amartya Sen.The book is divided into nine self-contained chapters: "Defining
Democracy," which discusses procedural, deliberative, and substantive democracy; "Sources of
Democracy," on why democracy exists in some countries and not in others; "Democracy, Culture, and
Society," about cultural and sociological preconditions for democracy; "Democracy and
Constitutionalism," which focuses on the importance of independent courts and a bill of rights;
"Presidentialism versus Parliamentarianism"; "Representation," discussing which is the fairest system of democratic accountability; "Interest Groups"; "Democracy's Effects," an examination of the effect of democracy on economic growth and social inequality; and finally, "Democracy and the Global
Order" discusses the effects of democracy on international relations, including the propensity for war and the erosion of national sovereignty by transnational forces.

The MIT Press

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher

" The Democracy Sourcebook brings together the classical texts on democratic politics with the best examples of contemporary scholarly argument and analysis. The modern texts are not yet classics, though some of them will be, and their inclusion here definitely gives them a leg up. For students who want to understand democracy and for students who see themselves as democratic citizens and activists, this is a superb collection." Michael Walzer,
Institute for Advanced Study

The MIT Press

" The Democracy Sourcebook is a magisterial collection of classic and contemporary readings, carefully chosen and edited, that gives readers direct access to some of the most important texts in the development of democratic thought." Thomas F. Remington, Emory
University

The MIT Press

"If you want to learn about democracy, The Democracy Sourcebook is the place to start. Dahl, Shapiro, and Cheibub have collected the best readings, both historical and contemporary, on what democracy is, how it works, and why it is important. This book will be the standard reference work on the subject." Joshua Cohen, Goldberg Professor of the Humanities, MIT,
and editor, Boston Review

The MIT Press

"If you want to learn about democracy, *The Democracy Sourcebook* is *the* place to start. Dahl, Shapiro, and Cheibub have collected the best readings, both historical and contemporary, on what democracy is, how it works, and why it is important. This book will be the standard reference work on the subject."--Joshua Cohen, Leon and Anne Goldberg Professor of the
Humanities and Head of the Department of Political Science, MIT

The MIT Press

"*The Democracy Sourcebook* is a magisterial collection of classic and contemporary readings, carefully chosen and edited, that gives readers direct access to some of the most important texts in the development of democratic thought."--Thomas F. Remington, Emory
University

The MIT Press

"*The Democracy Sourcebook* brings together the classical texts on democratic politics with the best examples of contemporary scholarly argument and analysis. The modern texts are not yet classics, though some of them will be, and their inclusion here definitely gives them a leg up. For students who want to understand democracy and for students who see themselves as democratic citizens and activists, this is a superb collection."--Michael Walzer, Institute for
Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ

The MIT Press

"Electing to Fight is an important book. With analytical power and historical depth,
Mansfield and Snyder argue for a simple conclusion: democratization can be dangerous, even if democracy, once achieved, is a good thing. Scholars, journalists, politicians, and citizens all need to hear this message, and to heed it. If Mansfield and Snyder are right, then policies that rely on war to promote elections are bound to produce disaster."--Joshua Cohen, Leon and Anne Goldberg
Professor of the Humanities and Head of the Department of Political Science, MIT

The MIT Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262042178
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2003
  • Pages: 568
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert A. Dahl, a leading authority on democracy, is the author of many books, including
A Preface to Democracy, Democracy and Its Critics, and
How Democratic Is the American Constitution? He is Sterling Professor Emeritus of
Political Science at Yale University.

Ian Shapiro is William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political
Science at Yale University.

José Antonio Cheibub is Associate Professor of Political Science at Yale University.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
1 Defining Democracy 1
The Social Contract 2
Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy 5
Minimalist Conception of Democracy: A Defense 12
Democracy and Disagreement 18
The Voice of the People 25
Defining and Developing Democracy 29
Participation and Democratic Theory 40
Polyarchal Democracy 48
2 Sources of Democracy 55
Political Man: The Social Bases of Politics 56
Social Revolutions in the Modern World 65
The Impact of Economic Development on Democracy 71
Democracy and the Market: Political and Economic Reforms in Eastern Europe and Latin America 76
Democracy's Third Wave 93
South Africa's Negotiated Transition: Democracy, Opposition, and the New Constitutional Order 99
Economic Development and Political Regimes 108
3 Democracy, Culture, and Society 117
The Federalist No. 10 118
The Federalist No. 14 123
The Concept of a Liberal Society 126
Pluralism and Social Choice 133
Consociational Democracy 142
The Contest of Ideas 147
The State of Democratic Theory 153
Democracy 157
Modernization, Cultural Change, and the Persistence of Traditional Values 168
Culture and Democracy 181
4 Democracy and Constitutionalism 191
The Federalist No. 23 192
The Federalist No. 47 193
The Federalist No. 48 195
The Federalist No. 62 197
The Federalist No. 70 199
The Federalist No. 78 201
Madisonian Democracy 207
A Bill of Rights for Britain 217
A Rights-Based Critique of Constitutional Rights 221
The Political Origins of Judicial Empowerment through Constitutionalization: Lessons from Four Constitutional Revolutions 232
Decision Making in a Democracy: The Supreme Court as a National Policymaker 246
Democratic Justice 252
5 Presidentialism Versus Parliamentarism 257
The Perils of Presidentialism 258
Presidentialism, Multipartism, and Democracy: The Difficult Combination 266
Presidents and Assemblies 272
Minority Governments, Deadlock Situations, and the Survival of Presidential Democracies 277
Minority Governments in Parliamentary Democracies: The Rationality of Nonwinning Cabinet Solutions 284
Institutional Design, Party Systems, and Governability: Differentiating the Presidential Regimes of Latin America 296
Presidential Power, Legislative Organization, and Party Behavior in Brazil 304
6 Representation 311
Representative Government 312
On Elections 315
Liberalism against Populism 317
Saving Democracy from Political Science 321
Unlikelihood of Condorcet's Paradox in a Large Society 326
Congruence between Citizens and Policymakers in Two Visions of Liberal Democracy 330
The Political Consequences of Electoral Laws 343
South Africa's Negotiated Transition: Democracy, Opposition, and the New Constitutional Order 350
The Representation of Women 354
7 Interest Groups 363
The Governmental Process: Political Interests and Public Opinion 364
The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups 372
Neo-Pluralism: A Class Analysis of Pluralism I and Pluralism II 381
The Theory of Economic Regulation 393
Interest Intermediation and Regime Governability in Contemporary Western Europe and North America 398
Inside Campaign Finance: Myths and Realities 408
8 Democracy's Effects 419
The Economics and Politics of Growth 420
Rent Seeking and Redistribution under Democracy versus Dictatorship 427
Dictatorship, Democracy, and Development 436
Freedom Favors Development 444
Political Regimes and Economic Growth 447
Democracy in America 455
Does Democracy Engender Justice? 459
Facing up to the American Dream: Race, Class, and the Soul of the Nation 463
Beyond Tocqueville, Myrdal, and Hartz: The Multiple Traditions in America 480
9 Democracy and the Global Order 489
Perpetual Peace 490
How Democracy, Interdependence, and International Organizations Create a System for Peace 492
Dirty Pool 497
Democracy and Collective Bads 504
Representation and the Democratic Deficit 510
The Transformation of Political Community: Rethinking Democracy in the Context of Globalization 516
Appendix 527
Index 535
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