The development of Palestine exploration; being the Ely lectures for 1903

The development of Palestine exploration; being the Ely lectures for 1903

by Frederick Jones Bliss
     
 

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
LECTURE III THE CRUSADERS AND AFTER With the entry of the Crusaders into Jerusalem a new impetus was given to travel in Palestine. From 1099 to 1187—almost an entire… See more details below

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
LECTURE III THE CRUSADERS AND AFTER With the entry of the Crusaders into Jerusalem a new impetus was given to travel in Palestine. From 1099 to 1187—almost an entire century—pilgrims found the Holy Land under Christian rule. No longer were they entering a hostile country, held by masters professing a hostile religion. At the beginning of this period, while the conquest of the land was still in progress, and toward its close when Saladin, rapid and destructive as a forest fire, was flashing to and fro between Cairo and Damascus, bent on the complete reconquest of Palestine, the country was in a condition more or less disturbed, but during the intervening years, general quiet and security prevailed. No wonder that the spirit of pilgrimage which had fired the Christians of the West early in the fourth century, and which was dimmed, though never extinguished, during the four and a half centuries of Moslem rule, now flamed forth anew. Nor was the Christian ardor quenched by the immense loss of territory following that fatal 5th of July, when on the Horns of Hattin, the traditional site of the Mount of Beatitudes, Saladin obtained possession of the Holy Cross. Pursuing his advantage, in three months he had taken Jerusalem,and in three years most of the cities of the Pranks had, one after another, fallen before his vehement attacks until nothing remained to them except Tyre, Tripoli, and Antioch. But the woful tale of disaster shook Christian Europe, and, led by Richard of England and Philip of France, the armies of the Third Crusade captured Cyprus, destined to remain in Christian hands till 1486; retook Acre on July 12, 1191; avenged the Battle of Hattin at Arsuf, on September 7th, where Saladin met an awful defeat; and during the next year so harried that magnificent enemy, who ...

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ISBN-13:
2940019661602
Publisher:
New York : C. Scribner''s Sons
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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LECTURE III THE CRUSADERS AND AFTER With the entry of the Crusaders into Jerusalem a new impetus was given to travel in Palestine. From 1099 to 1187 almost an entire century pilgrims found the Holy Land under Christian rule. No longer were they entering a hostile country, held by masters professing a hostile religion. At the beginning of this period, while the conquest of the land was still in progress, and toward its close when Saladin, rapid and destructive as a forest fire, was flashing to and fro between Cairo and Damascus, bent on the complete reconquest of Palestine, the country was in a condition more or less disturbed, but during the intervening years, general quiet and security prevailed. No wonder that the spirit of pilgrimage which had fired the Christians of the West early in the fourth century, and which was dimmed, though never extinguished, during the four and a half centuries of Moslem rule, now flamed forth anew. Nor was the Christian ardor quenched by the immense loss of territory following that fatal 5th of July, when on the Horns of Hattin, the traditional site of the Mount of Beatitudes, Saladin obtained possession of the Holy Cross. Pursuing his advantage, in three months he had taken Jerusalem,and in three years most of the cities of the Pranks had, one after another, fallen before his vehement attacks until nothing remained to them except Tyre, Tripoli, and Antioch. But the woful tale of disaster shook Christian Europe, and, led by Richard of England and Philip of France, the armies of the Third Crusade captured Cyprus, destined to remain in Christian hands till 1486; retook Acre on July 12, 1191; avenged the Battle of Hattin at Arsuf, on September 7th,where Saladin met an awful defeat; and during the next year so harried that magnificent enemy, who ...

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