The development of Palestine exploration; being the Ely lectures for 1903 [NOOK Book]

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
LECTURE III THE CRUSADERS AND AFTER With the entry of the Crusaders into Jerusalem a new impetus was given to travel in Palestine. From 1099 to 1187—almost an entire century—pilgrims found the Holy Land under Christian rule. No ...
See more details below
The development of Palestine exploration; being the Ely lectures for 1903

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1906 volume)
FREE

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
LECTURE III THE CRUSADERS AND AFTER With the entry of the Crusaders into Jerusalem a new impetus was given to travel in Palestine. From 1099 to 1187—almost an entire century—pilgrims found the Holy Land under Christian rule. No longer were they entering a hostile country, held by masters professing a hostile religion. At the beginning of this period, while the conquest of the land was still in progress, and toward its close when Saladin, rapid and destructive as a forest fire, was flashing to and fro between Cairo and Damascus, bent on the complete reconquest of Palestine, the country was in a condition more or less disturbed, but during the intervening years, general quiet and security prevailed. No wonder that the spirit of pilgrimage which had fired the Christians of the West early in the fourth century, and which was dimmed, though never extinguished, during the four and a half centuries of Moslem rule, now flamed forth anew. Nor was the Christian ardor quenched by the immense loss of territory following that fatal 5th of July, when on the Horns of Hattin, the traditional site of the Mount of Beatitudes, Saladin obtained possession of the Holy Cross. Pursuing his advantage, in three months he had taken Jerusalem,and in three years most of the cities of the Pranks had, one after another, fallen before his vehement attacks until nothing remained to them except Tyre, Tripoli, and Antioch. But the woful tale of disaster shook Christian Europe, and, led by Richard of England and Philip of France, the armies of the Third Crusade captured Cyprus, destined to remain in Christian hands till 1486; retook Acre on July 12, 1191; avenged the Battle of Hattin at Arsuf, on September 7th, where Saladin met an awful defeat; and during the next year so harried that magnificent enemy, who ...
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940019661602
  • Publisher: New York : C. Scribner''s Sons
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1906 volume
  • File size: 578 KB

Read an Excerpt


LECTURE III THE CRUSADERS AND AFTER With the entry of the Crusaders into Jerusalem a new impetus was given to travel in Palestine. From 1099 to 1187 almost an entire century pilgrims found the Holy Land under Christian rule. No longer were they entering a hostile country, held by masters professing a hostile religion. At the beginning of this period, while the conquest of the land was still in progress, and toward its close when Saladin, rapid and destructive as a forest fire, was flashing to and fro between Cairo and Damascus, bent on the complete reconquest of Palestine, the country was in a condition more or less disturbed, but during the intervening years, general quiet and security prevailed. No wonder that the spirit of pilgrimage which had fired the Christians of the West early in the fourth century, and which was dimmed, though never extinguished, during the four and a half centuries of Moslem rule, now flamed forth anew. Nor was the Christian ardor quenched by the immense loss of territory following that fatal 5th of July, when on the Horns of Hattin, the traditional site of the Mount of Beatitudes, Saladin obtained possession of the Holy Cross. Pursuing his advantage, in three months he had taken Jerusalem,and in three years most of the cities of the Pranks had, one after another, fallen before his vehement attacks until nothing remained to them except Tyre, Tripoli, and Antioch. But the woful tale of disaster shook Christian Europe, and, led by Richard of England and Philip of France, the armies of the Third Crusade captured Cyprus, destined to remain in Christian hands till 1486; retook Acre on July 12, 1191; avenged the Battle of Hattin at Arsuf, on September 7th,where Saladin met an awful defeat; and during the next year so harried that magnificent enemy, who ...
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)