Devil We Don't Know: The Dark Side of Revolutions in the Middle East

( 3 )

Overview

Respected human rights activist Nonie Darwish assesses the potential for freedom to succeed following the recent revolutions in the Middle East

The recent powerful wave of Middle East uprisings has fueled both hope and trepidation in the region and around the world as the ultimate fate—and fallout—of the Arab Spring continue to hang in the balance. Born and raised as a Muslim in Egypt and now living in the United States, Nonie Darwish brings an informed perspective to this ...

See more details below
Hardcover (First Edition)
$18.62
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$25.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (11) from $14.16   
  • New (7) from $15.74   
  • Used (4) from $14.16   
The Devil We Don't Know: The Dark Side of Revolutions in the Middle East

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$14.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$25.95 List Price

Overview

Respected human rights activist Nonie Darwish assesses the potential for freedom to succeed following the recent revolutions in the Middle East

The recent powerful wave of Middle East uprisings has fueled both hope and trepidation in the region and around the world as the ultimate fate—and fallout—of the Arab Spring continue to hang in the balance. Born and raised as a Muslim in Egypt and now living in the United States, Nonie Darwish brings an informed perspective to this carefully considered assessment of the potential outcome of the revolutions in the Middle East. This thought-provoking book will add to the ongoing debate on what the future holds for the people and the politics of the region and on the ultimate compatibility of freedom and democracy in the Muslim world.

  • Takes an unflinching, in-depth look at the ramifications of the game-changing recent uprisings in the Middle East
  • Examines the factors that will obstruct or support freedom and democracy in the Muslim world
  • Written by a former journalist for the Middle East News Agency who has written extensively on the Middle East, Islam, and women's rights, and who is also the author of Cruel and Unusual Punishment: The Terrifying Implications of Islamic Law and Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118133392
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 2/28/2012
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 304,944
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Human rights activist Nonie Darwish was born and raised as a Muslim in Egypt and Gaza living under sharia. Her father headed the Egyptian military intelligence in Gaza in the 1950s and led Fedayeen operations against Israel under Egyptian president Nasser. Educated at the American University in Cairo, she emigrated to the United States with her husband, converted to Christianity, and worked as a journalist at the Middle East News Agency. She founded ArabsForIsrael.com in 1984, to promote understanding, peace, and support for Israel. She also cofounded in 2009 FormerMuslimsUnited.org, which stands for freedom of religion and civil rights of former Muslims. She was featured in the documentary film Obsession and was recently nominated for the Train Foundation's Civil Courage Prize.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction 1

1. The Cycle of Dictatorships and Revolutions 7

2. Why Islamic Revolutions Are Doomed to Fail 27

3. A Muslim’s Burden: How Islam Fails the Individual 51

4. Israel amid Islamic Tornadoes 87

5. Exodus: The Rise of Islamic Apostasy 115

6. Will the Arab Spring Usher In a Feminist Movement? 145

7. Western Vulnerability 171

8. House of Cards: The Downfall of Islam as We Know It 199

Conclusion 221

Notes 227

Index 233

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2014

    Another anony

    How does one review and rate a book one has never read? I gave 5 stars just to even out an unjust rating.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    The dedication of this book bothered me and made me not buy it:

    The dedication of this book bothered me and made me not buy it: "To two Mohammed's who left Islam..... "
    So this woman whose other book cries that she is 'considered' an 'Infidel' now applauds people who leave Islam!? Amazing. Misery wants company, Ms. Darwish? It's never too late to repent and come back to Islam. But, you know, the devil fools the best of us into thinking we are doing right when we are doing wrong. I also don't like the fact that she keeps using the incident of the poor fruit merchant in Tunisia and the policewoman who 'slapped his face in public' which this author goes to great lengths to exploit that it was a great 'humiliation' for the 26 year old poor man. This young man was very poor, Tunisian government was not producing more jobs, and when this policewoman took away his cart of fruits and vegetables to sell on the street, HE LOST HIS INCOME. He set himself on fire as a public demonstration. This author doesn't really expound upon why he really killed himself; that it was due to his poverty. The policewoman took away his work. No, she exploits that it was because he had been publically humiliated. I just will not waste my money on a writer who takes a story or anything and twists it into something that it isn't.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)