The Diabetic Athlete: Prescriptions for Exercise and Sports

The Diabetic Athlete: Prescriptions for Exercise and Sports

by Sheri Colberg-Ochs
     
 

The Diabetic Athlete is the only book on the market that gives athletes and dedicated fitness enthusiasts the practical tips to manage type 1 or type 2 diabetes better while training and competing for performance.

Written by a diabetic athlete with a PhD in exercise physiology and endorsed by Dr. Edward Horton, a recognized

See more details below

Overview

The Diabetic Athlete is the only book on the market that gives athletes and dedicated fitness enthusiasts the practical tips to manage type 1 or type 2 diabetes better while training and competing for performance.

Written by a diabetic athlete with a PhD in exercise physiology and endorsed by Dr. Edward Horton, a recognized diabetes expert, The Diabetic Athlete draws from collected expertise of hundreds of diabetic athletes, sharing their experiences from sports and fitness training. Colberg analyses their experiences and provides practical advice on blood sugar balance, nutrition, and exercise to help you pursue a normal, vigorously active life.

The book presents real-life examples from diabetic athletes on the special modifications they make in their diet and medication for various sports and physical activities, including general recommendations for diet and insulin changes for each activity.

The Diabetic Athlete also covers the basics of exercise physiology, metabolism, nutrition, and supplements, including the following critical information:

- Blood sugar response to activity
- Insulin and oral medications
- Nutritional and ergogenic substances
- Insulin options for NPH and lente, ultralente, and pump users

No other book gives so many sport-specific recommendations to help you safely pursue the activities you enjoy. With Dr. Colberg's advice, you'll feel better than ever while training for fitness and sport performance.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Raelene E. Maser, PhD (University of Delaware)
Description: Although exercise is one of the cornerstones in the overall management of diabetes, exercise can be a challenging factor for individuals to incorporate and use as a management tool. Due to the different types of diabetes as well as the various therapeutic regimens used in its treatment, global recommendations regarding exercise can be vague and may therefore contribute to the underutilization of exercise as a management tool.
Purpose: The author of this book provides guidance for individuals to safely and successfully include exercise as a part of their diabetes management plan.
Audience: Although written for the individual with diabetes, any healthcare professional involved in helping individuals to start and continue exercise programs will find the book to be a helpful resource.
Features: Specifically, the author covers both the fundamental interactions between exercise and diabetes control while describing how certain diabetes-related complications can affect an individual's exercise prescription. In addition, recommendations are given for dietary and medication strategies for 86 different activities along with insights for using other diabetes management tools (e.g., blood glucose monitoring) so that individuals can achieve the benefits of that physical activity while maintaining good blood glucose control. Individuals using an insulin pump should find the insulin pump guidelines very useful.
Assessment: The author, an exercise physiologist, uses her personal experience as a diabetic athlete as well as the experiences of other diabetic athletes to provide a significant resource for anyone wanting to know how to safely obtain benefit from just about every conceivable form of physical activity.
Raelene E. Maser
Although exercise is one of the cornerstones in the overall management of diabetes, exercise can be a challenging factor for individuals to incorporate and use as a management tool. Due to the different types of diabetes as well as the various therapeutic regimens used in its treatment, global recommendations regarding exercise can be vague and may therefore contribute to the underutilization of exercise as a management tool. The author of this book provides guidance for individuals to safely and successfully include exercise as a part of their diabetes management plan. Although written for the individual with diabetes, any healthcare professional involved in helping individuals to start and continue exercise programs will find the book to be a helpful resource. Specifically, the author covers both the fundamental interactions between exercise and diabetes control while describing how certain diabetes-related complications can affect an individual's exercise prescription. In addition, recommendations are given for dietary and medication strategies for 86 different activities along with insights for using other diabetes management tools (e.g., blood glucose monitoring) so that individuals can achieve the benefits of that physical activity while maintaining good blood glucose control. Individuals using an insulin pump should find the insulin pump guidelines very useful. The author, an exercise physiologist, uses her personal experience as a diabetic athlete as well as the experiences of other diabetic athletes to provide a significant resource for anyone wanting to know how to safely obtain benefit from just about every conceivable form of physical activity.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780736032711
Publisher:
Human Kinetics Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/2000
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

Treatment of diabetes has gone through dramatic changes in the past two decades. Previously, exercise was often overlooked as a "cornerstone" in its treatment as it can be more difficult to maintain blood sugar levels with physical activity as an extra variable, especially for individuals with type 1 diabetes. Nowadays, however, with frequent blood glucose monitoring, exercise can be done safely and without fear of severely upsetting a delicate glucose balance.

Diagnosed with diabetes myself at the age of four in the "Dark Ages" of diabetes (1968), I went through childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood without benefit of a blood glucose meter. I still participated in a wide variety of sports and physical activities, but did many of them feeling less than my physical best (experiencing either high or low blood sugars during them). Growing up I always felt better overall after doing any exercise, although at the time I did not understand the physiology behind it. I also felt I had more control over my diabetes if I exercised. Consequently, I began working out regularly on my own and through participation in sports as a young teenager and have continued being regularly physically active throughout my adulthood.

Not until I had a blood glucose meter did I realize, however, how much better I felt when exercising with my blood sugars in a more normal range. Keeping them normal during exercise, however, has totally been a trial-and-error learning process! At the time I got my first meter, there were very few guidelines or books that could offer me any guidance. I did eventually learn to control my blood sugars for my usual activities, but every time I tried a new or unusual one, it felt like I was like starting over again. When I attended my first IDAA in Phoenix, Arizona in 1990, I met a lot of other active individuals. It occured to me then that I could learn so much from others' experiences that would hopefully make my trial-and-error process shorter and easier. It was from this experience that I eventually got the idea and motivation to write The Diabetic Athlete.

In 1998 I sent out a questionnaire to all English-speaking members of the IDAA (~1700 members) and received responses back from about 250 individuals (some were from those of you reading this!) My questionnaire asked them to describe their usual diet, medication, exercise routines, and most importantly, specific alterations made for a variety of sports and recreational physical activities. They were also asked to indicate their use of current and past exercise guidelines. The Diabetic Athlete is a compilation of these experiences (as well as some general recommendations) that each of you can hopefully use to more easily attain better blood sugar control while doing any type of physical activity.

The first part of The Diabetic Athlete covers the exercise basics. I have always found that knowledge is power when it comes to managing diabetes. I searched out information for years, finally resulted in my earning of a doctoral degree in Exercise Physiology from the University of California, Berkeley! While you do not need a Ph.D. to understand how your body adapts to exercise, you do need to understand the basics in order to make knowledgeable and safe changes in your diet or medications.

The first chapter deals with the basics of exercise prescription: how to monitor your exercise intensity, what type of exercise to do, how often to exercise, and for how long. If you really want to have gains in your fitness and endurance, you will benefit from understanding how to work out properly. Your workout intensity determines alot of the overload on your muscles and your subsequent fitness gains. Warm-ups and cool-downs are important for all athletes, but especially for diabetic athletes who may have some unique diabetes-related concerns.

The second chapter is key to understanding your blood sugar response to any activity. Once you can determine what energy systems and fuels your body uses during exercise, then you can almost predict what your blood sugar response will be and what actions you need to take during and following the activity. It is also important to understand how circulating levels of insulin can alter your normal response to an activity, and what kind of an effect chronic training has on fuel utilization.

The third chapter will help you to understand the types of medications and regimens that individuals use to either replace insulin or improve its production and action. Again, your circulating insulin levels will be greatly affected by differing insulin regimens, timing of exercise, and sensitivity to insulin. Exercise in the morning can result in a very different response all the potential symptoms of hypoglycemia (especially if you gave not had many episodes of hypoglycemia) as they may be different during exercise and after training.

The purpose of fourth chapter is address just some of the many nutritional and ergogenic substances currently on the market in terms of their effectiveness and their safety of use for athletes and, specifically, diabetic atheletes. This chapter addresses nutritional supplements specifically with regard to their effects on athletic performance and on blood sugar regulation during exercise, and those of potential benefit or harm to diabetic athletes are noted.

The fifth and sixth chapters address some special concerns and precautions for diabetic athletes with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Chapter five specifically relays some of the athletes' reported responses to published exercise guidelines and gives you the benefit of knowing how other individuals use them. Diabetic complications are, unfortunately, a reality for many individuals with diabetes; exercise can usually still be done, but certain precautions are discussed to make exercise safer.

The second part of the book can really help you reduce your trial-and-error time for participation in almost any conceivable sport or physically activity! This part is arranged into four chapters by type of activity: endurance sports (including running, swimming, cycling, and other sports), power sports (such as basketball and softball), fitness activities (such as aerobics, weight training, and other gym workouts), and finally recreational sports (including current crazes like rock climbing, in-line skating, and snowboarding). In each chapter, general recommendations for diet, insulin, or medication changes are given for each specific sport or activity as well as real-life examples from diabetic athletes who participate in those sports.

While general guidelines alone are never effective for everyone due to individual variability, you can additionally benefit from the knowledge of others' experiences. It is my belief that this combination of basic (the why of exercise) and experiential (the how of exercise) information about exercise can benefit all of us in maintaining blood sugars during any physical endeavor! So lose the excuses! Whether you are interesting in just recreating or want to be a serious competitive athlete, it is time to get out there and exercise!

Read More

What People are saying about this

David E. Kelley
A practical and thoughtful book that will be helpful for individuals with diabetes who want to safely enjoy exercise. Dr. Sheri Colberg is an exercise scientist with special expertise in diabetes. (David E. Kelley, Director of the University of Pittsburgh's Obesity and Nutrtion Reseatch Center)
From the Publisher
"

""The Diabetic Athlete underscores the fact that exercise is critical to the person with diabetes. The book is designed for the active person with diabetes and the health care provider. The first part provides a basic understanding of the diabetic athlete's response to exercise and sports. The second part provides suggestions for and examples of how diabetic athletes prepare for and respond to exercise-induced changes in blood glucose.”

Al Lewis, PhD
Board of directors chairman of the International Diabetic Athletes Association (IDAA)

“A practical and thoughtful book that will be helpful for individuals with diabetes who want to safely enjoy exercise. Dr. Sheri Colberg is an exercise scientist with special expertise in diabetes.”

David E. Kelley, MD
Director of the University of Pittsburgh's Obesity and Nutrition Research Center

"

Al Lewis
The Diabetic Athelete underscores the fact that exercise is critical to the person with diabetes. The book is designed for the active person with diabetes and the health care provider. The first part provides a basic understanding of the diabetic athlete's response to exercise and sports. The second part provides suggestions for and esamples of how diabetic atheletes prepare for and respond to exercise-induced changes in blood glucose. (Al Lewis, Ph.D., Board of Directors, Chairman, International Diabetic Athletes Association)

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >