The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence

The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence

by Francis Grose
     
 

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Originally printed as a guide to street slang for men of quality, The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue is a gem! The avowed purpose of the dictionary was to give men ‘of fashion’ an insight into the inappropriate language of the street. Read in modern times it is by turn uproariously funny and deeply confusing and yet certain truths have remained –

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Overview

Originally printed as a guide to street slang for men of quality, The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue is a gem! The avowed purpose of the dictionary was to give men ‘of fashion’ an insight into the inappropriate language of the street. Read in modern times it is by turn uproariously funny and deeply confusing and yet certain truths have remained – the need for the mot juste has not diminished. Many of the words should be brought back into common parlance forthwith: we have no term for the ‘admiral of the narrow seas’ – ‘One who from drunkenness vomits into the lap of the person sitting opposite to him.’ We have perhaps less use for a word for ‘dobin rig’: ‘Stealing ribbons from haberdashers early in the morning or late at night; generally practised by women in the disguise of maid servants.’ Learn how the Georgians and early Victorians would insult each other and find out how some of today's words and derivations have come about in this quirky little volume. DOCK: Lie with a woman. ELBOW SHAKER: A dice player. FLASH THE HASH: Vomit. GLAZIER: Someone who breaks windows to steal goods for sale. INEXPRESSIBLES: Breeches. SHY COCK: One who keeps within doors for fear of bailiffs. STRIP ME NAKED: Gin. TWIDDLE-DIDDLES: Testicles. UNLICKED CUB: Rude, uncouth young fellow.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"It was a runaway success when published in 1811 by soldier Francis Grose, but now The Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue is getting tongues wagging again after being published online." —Telegraph

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780942339
Publisher:
Hesperus Press
Publication date:
02/01/2014
Series:
Hesperus Classics
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
File size:
0 MB

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