×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Disappearance of Sherlock Holmes
     

Disappearance of Sherlock Holmes

3.7 4
by Larry Millett
 

See All Formats & Editions

SHERLOCK HOLMES DISAPPEARS, POLICE SUSPECT FAMED DETECTIVE IN KIDNAPPING AND MURDER reads a New York headline. So begins the fifth mystery in Larry Millett’s series.

A letter, written in a secret cipher he recognizes all too well, reveals that an old foe of Holmes—a murderer he once captured after an incredible duel of wits—is back, has kidnapped

Overview

SHERLOCK HOLMES DISAPPEARS, POLICE SUSPECT FAMED DETECTIVE IN KIDNAPPING AND MURDER reads a New York headline. So begins the fifth mystery in Larry Millett’s series.

A letter, written in a secret cipher he recognizes all too well, reveals that an old foe of Holmes—a murderer he once captured after an incredible duel of wits—is back, has kidnapped his previous victim’s widow, and is now impersonating Holmes himself. Holmes must once again match wits with a particularly cunning adversary, one whose hatred of Holmes has seemingly become the killer’s single greatest obsession.

Chasing the kidnapper from London to New York to Chicago, Holmes and Watson race to keep up. Every move Holmes makes is expected; every trap proves elusive. Only with the assistance of his American cohort, the saloonkeeper Shadwell Rafferty, can Holmes hope to settle the score once and for all—or be framed for the crime himself.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Millett recreates the world of Holmes with uncanny precision." —Booklist

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780816669936
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
Publication date:
03/23/2012
Series:
Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
429,688
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.90(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Larry Millett was a reporter and architecture critic for the St. Paul Pioneer Press for thirty years. He is the author of fifteen books, including five other mystery novels in this series featuring Sherlock Holmes and Shadwell Rafferty, all in new editions from the University of Minnesota Press.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Disappearance of Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock Holmes & Shadwell Rafferty Series #5) 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Forget about the other Holmes pastiches, this series shines. Millett is at his best in this novel, a well plotted mystery ranging from New York to St. Paul. Instead of the distant, stuffy Holmes other writers seem to produce, Millett's Holmes is accessible and more importantly, believeable. While more a regional mystery set in Midwestern cities, this book still carries a national appeal. Millett is an architectural critic by trade, but clearly has the Sherlock canon down. Conan Doyle would be proud.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The Disappearance of Sherlock Holmes' by Larry Millett is an intriguing mystery. The characters are well developed. Each character has a distinct personality which adds depth and detail to the story. The setting is described well and is given in great detail. There are several possible suspects in the kidnapping of Elsie Cubitt and the disappearance of Sherlock Holmes. However the real criminal is not particularly easy to determine. This is the first book that I have read in the Sherlock Holmes series. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the mystery genre or those interested in the famous literary character of Sherlock Holmes. Although this is the only book in which I have read from the series, I personally am interested in reading the other titles by Larry Millett.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read all five of Larry Millett's series of Holmes books and, like other commentators, found this fifth installment a bit of a let down. More action/adventure story than detective who-dun-it, the story line moves swiftly enough along. However, there is very little guesswork involved and any reader of Millett should be able to quickly guess the identity of both the Conspirator and the CO-Conspirator. Worse, Millett, who loves to inundate the reader with footnotes and lengthy historical documentation and explanations, is guilty of a few glaring errors of sequence and plot line. On page 126, Watson loses his gun but on page 139 he seems to have recovered it. Later on it is once again missing. On page 294, Detective Wooldridge references Hibernia Hall being guarded "like Fort Knox". It is July, 1900. Fort Knox was first established as a training camp in 1917 and as a permanent facility in 1932. U.S. Depository vaults to hold the nations' gold bullion stocks were not added until 1936. Overall, I think it time Millett either refrain from bringing Holmes to the midwest, or begins series that feature Shadwell Rafferty and George Washington Thomas, or perhaps features detectives Hargreave and Bissen of New York or detective Wooldridge of Chicago. Try as we might, Sherlock cannot be expected to visit Minnesota and the midwest on an annual basis anymore.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1900 London the great Sherlock Holmes receives a message written in code that leads the detective to deduce that murdering mobster Abe Slaney survived his harrowing escape from prison rather than drowned as reported. Having barely stopped Abe before, Holmes knows the rematch will prove even more difficult and he also thinks someone else is playing him and his sidekick Watson like puppets on a strings. Elsie Cubitt has vanished after withdrawing 5,000 pounds from her bank and Slaney is the most likely culprit. Holmes starts his quest by visiting a spiritualist, a confidant of Elsie. However, soon after Holmes leaves, the spiritualist vanishes too. The trail turns murky when a Holmes impersonator seems to be just in front of the London duo, leaving behind fallacious clues to throw Sherlock off and crime victims wanting retribution. The dynamic duo journeys to New York City where Homes also vanishes, leaving Watson and bartender buddy Shadwell Rafferty in Chicago in search of the great sleuth and Elsie. Though a solid homage to Doyle and Holmes, THE DISAPPEARANCE OF SHERLOCK HOLMES never quite grips the audience as one would expect with Holmes missing and apparently a prisoner of a devious enemy. Instead, the reader sees an insightful look at the late Victorian era on both sides of the Atlantic and the ho hum of another case as related by Watson. Though the candid insight by Elsie, Holmes, and others adds depth, this tribute is more for the Baker Street crowd revering along with Larry Millet one of the notables. Harriet Klausner