Divorce Helpbook for Teens

Divorce Helpbook for Teens

5.0 1
by Cynthia MacGregor
     
 

MacGregor knows that divorce can be especially tough on teens, and her warm and friendly guide offers a helping hand to teens struggling to answer the tough questions when their parents divorce: Why do parents get divorced? How will the divorce change our lives? What can I do to feel less depressed? Who can I talk to about my problems? What's going to

Overview


MacGregor knows that divorce can be especially tough on teens, and her warm and friendly guide offers a helping hand to teens struggling to answer the tough questions when their parents divorce: Why do parents get divorced? How will the divorce change our lives? What can I do to feel less depressed? Who can I talk to about my problems? What's going to happen next? How do you tell absent parents that they don't visit enough? How do you say "no" to parents who want you to carry messages to, or spy on, the other parent? What is there to talk about when you visit a parent who's moved away?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Here is a book that is as helpful to teens as to their parents. From the emotional to the pragmatic aspects of divorce, both will benefit from these insights.”
Vicki Lansky, author, Divorce Book for Parents and It's Not Your Fault, Koko Bear

“Reminds teens that divorce is between the parents and in no way is the fault of the children. It also advises the teenager how to build a support group from among friends, relatives and others.”
Mark Roseman, PhD, Deputy Director for Child Access, Children's Rights Council

“Teens will find reassurance and common sense ideas on how to feel better, how to understand the crazy things parents do when they fall out of love with each other, and how to talk...about all the changes.”
Hugh R. Leavell, PhD, Marriage and Family Therapist

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781886230576
Publisher:
New Harbinger Publications
Publication date:
04/01/2004
Series:
Rebuilding Books, for Divorce and Beyond
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
563,925
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.19(d)
Age Range:
15 - 18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author


Cynthia MacGregor is the author of nearly 50 books for parents and children, many with a focus on helping kids through difficult situations. A divorced mother herself, she helped her own daughter (now an adult) cope with parental divorce, and brings real-life experience to the subject of this book.

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The Divorce Helpbook for Teens 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Teen angst compounded by the turmoil of divorcing parents is not a subject for the fainthearted to tackle. But MacGregor¿s engaging style quickly establishes empathy with this challenging group, offering genuine warmth and reliable advice along with sensitivity to her readers¿ many vulnerabilities. Her objective is not to function as a single-handed self-help guru; throughout the book she reminds kids to turn to trusted individuals in their lives for additional help. She maintains a thoughtful level of clear-headed reassurance, gently urging teens to think outside their pain and confusion to realize they¿re not alone. This applies to all aspects of their experience of divorce, which MacGregor keenly understands as a uniquely stressful time for those ¿too young for childhood soothing and too young for adult stress relievers.¿ She offers age-appropriate comforts, effective ways to fight depression, and reasonable options for regaining the sense of security that divorce shatters. What I like best about this book, aside from MacGregor¿s unfailing instinct for zeroing in on issues crucial to teens, is her knack for relating to kids on a warm, nonjudgmental, respectfully informative way. Her attitude of compassionate practicality guides them -- without preaching -- to make wise choices. She counters common erroneous conclusions kids are apt to draw about divorce (I.e., it¿s their fault Mom and Dad broke up; they can get Mom and Dad back together, etc.), with insightful reality checks that avoid making the reader feel patronized. She¿s a staunch advocate, defending kids¿ right to refuse to participate in unfair tactics (like being used as messengers or spies) their divorced parents may resort to. At the same time, she underscores the importance of preserving relationships where possible by meeting each parent halfway. Smart exercises like keeping a journal help teens in pain to vent and sort out their emotions. MacGregor¿s goal is to get kids to see that, while they can¿t undo the divorce, they can avoid many of the resulting hassles. This sense of control is a crucial gift this skilled, empathetic author offers her readers. Know a teen of divorce who¿s struggling to adjust? This book is a great starting point for clearing hurdles and moving forward.