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The Doctrine of Venus
     

The Doctrine of Venus

3.2 4
by James Wood
 

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A short story like no other. Historical fiction melded with erotica, and "The Doctrine of Venus" at its heart.

Step back in history one hundred years to the trial of a society beauty. Her scandalous affair lends publicity to a book that advocates sexual depravity--the Doctrine. Reproduced here in its entirety, the 3rd edition of "The Doctrine of Venus" has

Overview

A short story like no other. Historical fiction melded with erotica, and "The Doctrine of Venus" at its heart.

Step back in history one hundred years to the trial of a society beauty. Her scandalous affair lends publicity to a book that advocates sexual depravity--the Doctrine. Reproduced here in its entirety, the 3rd edition of "The Doctrine of Venus" has been censored in America for a century. A seminal work of domination and submission, it is a rulebook for collaring your lover. It is a manifesto for romantics and sinners. Shocking and arousing, and complete with a dozen erotic photographs of the period, it whispers temptingly to readers to try it for themselves.

As sensational now as it was back then, "The Doctrine of Venus" is more than a hot read; it is a book that may change your life--forever.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940015782431
Publisher:
1001 Nights Press
Publication date:
08/20/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
446,489
File size:
4 MB

Meet the Author

British-born author James Wood spins sensuous taboo tales. Themes of domination and submission predominate - of hands on legs and garter straps and ladies bound in silk.

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The Doctrine of Venus 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Shar Azade More than 1 year ago
Unique! with fantastic vintage photos It really it what it says--a rulebook for collaring your lover. Dominant/submissive couples will know what to do with this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stellalunna More than 1 year ago
“The Doctrine of Venus” is truly what it claims to be, a manual on how to train a submissive. If you have read the “Paula’s Place” trilogy you will remember that this manual was noticed by Paula on Max’s desk. The manual it’s self is somewhat dry. Hey it’s a manual what would you expect. There isn’t much of a story here but what little there is does compliment the manual. There are also some artistic photos that are very sensual and that illustrate the topic nicely. If you are some one who likes to have an entire collection then this one will complete the above mentioned series.
terrancealdonshaw1 More than 1 year ago
James Wood’s “The Doctrine of Venus” won’t be for everybody; but, once found by its own small band of “proper observers,” this unusual little book may well assume the cachet of a cult classic, inspire costume parties and role-playing games, dedicated on-line chat rooms and secret societies. Simply enough, the author pretends to have unearthed a “scandalous” handbook from the Edwardian era (1901-1914); a manual or ‘vade mecum’ detailing the practice, style and manner of “civilized” bondage and submission, copiously illustrated with “racy” vintage glass-plate photographs. What readers will find here is a ‘facsimile’ of this mysterious tome, said to have languished for years in the restricted section of a large public library somewhere in North America. Brief narrative sections set in the present day “bookend” the manual and provide context. “The Doctrine of Venus” makes for an easily digestible primer to Wood’s contemporary stories of bondage and submission; “Taking Jennifer,” “Sharing Lucy,” and “Amy’s Choice.” Those already familiar with this fine body of work will recognize the author’s style of nostalgic reverence; the longing for an imagined, more elegant past, where elaborate language masks society’s rigid, often cruel moral dichotomies. Wasn’t being “naughty” more exciting—more fun—in a world that painted its mores in the starkest blacks and whites? When taboo really was taboo, and quite literally unspeakable? When the possibility of getting caught came with real-life consequences, scandal and ruin? On the downside, taken all at once, the handbook section can make for some rather dry reading. The piece as a whole might have been more interesting had the author expanded the contemporary narrative portions, interspersing them with excerpts from the vade mecum, the better to delve into his characters’ backstories and relationships, showing how each of them found out about the old book, and how reading it affected and changed them in different ways. And yet, Wood’s concept works because it connects with the part of our imaginations that can’t resist the urge to wonder “what if?” One can’t help but speculate about some of the possible undiscovered erotic gems languishing deep in the stacks of many a restricted section throughout the world. Perhaps there is a book very much like “The Doctrine of Venus” reposing silently beneath the dust moats, waiting to be rediscovered and brought into the light of a more liberated, albeit less gracious age.