The Dollhouse Fairy
  • The Dollhouse Fairy
  • The Dollhouse Fairy

The Dollhouse Fairy

by Jane Ray
     
 

What if a little girl looked in her dollhouse and found an injured — and very untidy — fairy? A sweet story from celebrated illustrator Jane Ray.

When Rosy discovers a real fairy living in her beloved dollhouse — the one her dad made just for her — she can’t believe her eyes. But Thistle is no ordinary fairy. Despite a hurt

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Overview

What if a little girl looked in her dollhouse and found an injured — and very untidy — fairy? A sweet story from celebrated illustrator Jane Ray.

When Rosy discovers a real fairy living in her beloved dollhouse — the one her dad made just for her — she can’t believe her eyes. But Thistle is no ordinary fairy. Despite a hurt wing, she’s turned all the tiny furnishings topsy-turvy, and she’s starving for raspberries and chips and other treats to eat. Rosy loves nurturing the mischievous fairy back to health, and can’t wait to introduce her to her dad when he returns from his hospital stay. With a true flair for visual detail, Jane Ray offers a tale of family and friendship that touches on illness with a lighthearted tone — and celebrates the healing power of the imagination.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A girl's rich imagination helps her cope with unexpected family stress in this uplifting picture book. Rosy treasures Saturday mornings spent with her father ("'Just me and my Rosy Posy,' Dad sang") as they decorate and play with the dollhouse he has built for her. But when Rosy awakens one Saturday to find that her father has been taken to the hospital, she tries to cheer herself by playing with the dollhouse solo. That's when she discovers that a rambunctious, messy, and wounded fairy named Thistle has taken up residence. As Rosy focuses on healing Thistle's hurt wing, her worries about her father begin to ease. Before long, Dad is back home, eager to meet Rosy's new friend (who has disappeared). Ray's (The Apple-Pip Princess) text floats on a fanciful idea and a predominantly lighthearted tone. She effectively conveys Rosy's concern without making the situation sound too frightening. The book's large trim size and Ray's vivid mixed-media artwork are a good match, introducing a close-knit family and highlighting an intricate dollhouse--and a spunky fairy--that any girl would love. Ages 3–7. (May)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Rosy loves the dollhouse her father has made for her, and enjoys their special times together. But one day Rosy wakes up to find her grandmother there. Her mother has had to take her father to the hospital. Although Grandma tries to reassure her, Rosy is worried. Seeking solace in her dollhouse, she is shocked to find everything there upset. And tucked in the bed is a fairy named Thistle, who asked to stay while her hurt wing heals. Thistle proves to be a difficult, demanding, and messy guest. But Rosy still has fun with and loves her recuperating fairy friend. She is also less worried when her mother tells her that her father is much better. When her father comes home, she tells him about Thistle. But when they look for her, she is gone. After cleaning up the house, Dad leaves Thistle a piece of cake, "just in case." A raggedy, smiling fairy stands in front of a handsome dollhouse on the front of the jacket, as if inviting us in. The inside is revealed on the front of the cover. Ray utilizes mixed media to create naturalistic, intricate interiors. Although the characters evoke our interest, and even sympathy, the major attractions are the wonderful details of the dollhouse. Readers may draw what parallels they like between the fairy fantasy and Rosy's feelings about her father. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 2—In this realistic story with a touch of magic, Rosy loves making special things for her dollhouse with her dad on Saturday mornings. One morning, he isn't there; he's gone to the hospital, and in his absence she finds a fairy with a hurt wing in the dollhouse. Rosy puts cream and bandages on Thistle's wing, plays with her in secret, and, as the fairy starts to mend, helps her practice flying. Mixed-media illustrations in Ray's sophisticated folk-art style are well paced, have a skilled use of white space, and start on the cover with the front of the dollhouse and end with the back. When her father returns, Rosy tells him about her guest, who appears to have flown. "But Dad left out a tiny piece of cake for Thistle, just in case...." Although there are many pink details and flowers, this is a decidedly different and not-too-sweet fairy story.—Debbie Hoskins, Grand Rapids Public Library, MI

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763644116
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
05/25/2010
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,371,359
Product dimensions:
10.90(w) x 1.90(h) x 0.10(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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