The Domestic Dog: Its Evolution, Behaviour and Interactions with People

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Overview

Dogs occupy a special position in human society. They were probably the first animal species to become domesticated, but their relationship with humans has always been ambivalent. Dogs form strong attachments to humans, even in the face of rejection and punishment, voluntarily allying themselves to us as faithful companions, uncomplaining child-substitutes, enduring workers, and excellent hunters and guards. Yet they are also reviled as vicious killers, unclean scavengers and outcasts. In this book, the many facets of dog behavior are set in the context of the dog's place in our society. Based on firm scientific research, the book dispells many myths and stereotypes about our canine friends, and it will be the definitive reference work on dog behavior for many years to come. Dog-lovers with an interest in understanding how and why dogs behave as they do will find this fascinating reading.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The technical quality of the data is high, the chapters well-written, and the book is well-organized. This title is a welcome addition to the scientific literature describing the behavior of dogs and dog-human interactions." Science Books and Films
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521425377
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 284
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Meet the Author

James Serpell is the Marie A. Moore Professor of Humane Ethics and Animal Welfare at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, where he also directs the Center for the Interaction of Animals & Society. He received his bachelor's degree in Zoology from University College London (UK) in 1974, and his PhD in Animal Behavior from the University of Liverpool (UK) in 1980. He moved to his current position at the University of Pennsylvania in 1993. Dr. Serpell is the current President of the International Society for Anthrozoology (ISAZ). He serves on the editorial boards of most of the major journals on animal welfare, applied animal behavior, and human-animal interactions. His research focuses on the behavior and welfare of companion animals, the development of human attitudes to animals, and the history of human-animal relationships. In addition to publishing more than 70 journal articles and book chapters on these and related topics, he is the author, editor, or co-editor of several books including Animals & Human Society: Changing Perspectives (1994), The Domestic Dog: Its Evolution, Behavior & Interactions with People (1995), In the Company of Animals (1996), and Companion Animals & Us (2000).

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction James Serpell; Part I. Domestication and Evolution: 2. Origins of the dog: domestication and early history Juliet Clutton-Brock; 3. Evolution of working dogs Raymond Coppinger, and Richard Schneider; Part II. Behaviour and Behaviour Problems: 4. Genetic aspects of dog behaviour with particular reference to working ability M. B. Willis; 5. Analysing breed and gender differences in behaviour Benjamin L. Hart; 6. Early experience and the development of behaviour James Serpell, and J. A. Jagoe; 7. Feeding behaviour of domestic dogs and the role of experience Chris Thorne; 8. Social and communication behaviour of companion dogs John W. S. Bradshaw, and Helen M. R. Nott; 9. The ethology and epidemiology of canine aggression Randall Lockwood; 10. Canine behavioural therapy Roger A. Mugford; 11. Effects of owner personality and attitudes on dog behaviour Valerie O'Farrell; Part III. Human-Dog Interactions: 12. Dogs as human companions: a review of the relationshipLynette A. Hart; 13. The welfare of dogs in human care Robert Hubrecht; 14. Variation in dog society: between resource dispersion and social flux? D. W. Macdonald, and G. M. Carr; 15. Population biology and ecology of feral dogs in central Italy L. Boitani, F. Francisci, P. Ciucci, and G. Andreoli; 16. From paragon to pariah: some reflections on human attitudes to dogs James Serpell; 17. The hair of the dog James Serpell; Index.

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