Door in the Hedge

( 17 )

Overview

Master storyteller Robin McKinley here spins two new fairy tales and retells two cherished classics. All feature princesses touched with or by magic. There is Linadel, who lives in a kingdom next to Faerieland, where princesses are stolen away on their seventeenth birthdays-and Linadel's seventeenth birthday is tomorrow. And Korah, whose brother is bewitched by the magical Golden Hind; now it is up to her to break the spell. Rana must turn to a talking frog to help save her kingdom from the evil Aliyander. And ...

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Overview

Master storyteller Robin McKinley here spins two new fairy tales and retells two cherished classics. All feature princesses touched with or by magic. There is Linadel, who lives in a kingdom next to Faerieland, where princesses are stolen away on their seventeenth birthdays-and Linadel's seventeenth birthday is tomorrow. And Korah, whose brother is bewitched by the magical Golden Hind; now it is up to her to break the spell. Rana must turn to a talking frog to help save her kingdom from the evil Aliyander. And then there are the twelve princesses, enspelled to dance through the soles of their shoes every night. . . . These are tales to read with delight!

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Two classic fairy tales retold and two new fairy tales send the reader into lands of princesses and magical lands. In the "The Stolen Princess," Princess Linadel has yet to find a suitable husband to wed. As the kingdom prepares for the princess' seventeenth birthday, she is stolen and taken to Faerieland. However, she is not the first in her kingdom to be taken. Many seventeen-year-old girls and many infant boys have been abducted through the years. But Princess Linadel will be the one to find out what happens to them after their disappearances. "The Princess and the Frog" is a classic fairy tale. Princess Rana is courted by Aliyander, but she really does not want to marry him. She meets the frog when she drops a necklace—given to her by Aliyander—into a pool. He makes his home in the palace and in her heart when she discovers he is really a prince. The Golden Hind has injured and killed many in "The Hunting of the Hind." Princess Korah is the only one who can rescue those who have been held by the Golden Hind's spell. "The Twelve Princesses" is a magical retelling of the princesses who wear out their shoes every night by dancing. Their father can not figure out how their the soles of their shoes are worn through each night until one soldier comes along and discovers the secret. These tales would be a great addition to any fantasy collection. McKinley spins beautiful tales of the kingdoms where princesses live and magic reigns supreme. 2003 (orig. 1981), Firebird/Penguin, Ages 12 up.
— Marcie Flinchum Atkins
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698119604
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 10/13/2003
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 331,883
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: 1110L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.17 (w) x 7.75 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

Robin McKinley has won various awards and citations for her writing, including the Newbery Medal for The Hero and the Crown and a Newbery Honor for The Blue Sword. Her other books include Sunshine; the New York Times bestseller Spindle's End; two novel-length retellings of the fairy tale Beauty and the Beast, Beauty and Rose Daughter; and a retelling of the Robin Hood legend, The Outlaws of Sherwood. She lives with her husband, the English writer Peter Dickinson.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2008

    a reviewer

    The door in the hedge is a wonderful fantasy book with four great tells told and re-told by Robin Mckinley. The first storie is the called the stolen princesses about a royal family with two twin daughters and on their sixteenth birthday one has mysteriously been kidnapped by so called faeries. The other twin grows up and has a beautiful and kind daughter named Linadel who on her sixteenth birthday is kidnapped to! The second tale is called The frog princess is about a princess who is given a mysterious necklace bya very powerful magician person. while she looks at it, it falls in a little pond she was sitting near. She then meets a talking frog that she asks to fetch the necklace for in return for anything. The third tlae is called the hunting of the hind it is about a prince who seeks a horrible woman men are hunting for, but who ever has seen the horrible creature has gone insane or dies. He escaped and his step sister is morrtified. She goes with the hunters to see the horrid creture and learn the thing that it does and destroy the thing that has drowned all her step brothers strength out of him. And the last tale is the twelve dancing princesses, the original tale. for a soldier seeks the seacret of where the twelve beautiful princesses dance at night to were their delicate dancing shoes, will he suceed. please read this wonderful book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2006

    boring

    thats all i have to say....boring

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2006

    Fantasy to the Max!

    There are four stories. A Door In The Hedge (I think, its the first one) : Princess Linadel is a wonderful princess. Bu on princess' seventeenth birthday, tomorrrow, so faieries take them away.Will she get tken away? Well, of course. But what happens after that? THis was definetely my favorite story. Only for romantics. This story was enchanting, but with less of that hidden humor only Robin McKinely can portray. The Princess And The Frog : Princess Rana is courted- unhappily- by the Prince ALiyander, a sorcerer. She is given a necklace, which she runs away with. She drops it in the pond, and it loses its evil glint. The frog resuces it, and she brings it to court. It turns out the frog has a dreadful-or not so dreadful- past of its own. Still, no humor. NOt as romantic. Very girl-powerish. An all arond great story, for the non-romantic audience. The Golden Hind : Princess Korah's borther was enchanted b the Golden HInd, a beautifu creature enchanted by a magician she helps take of the enchantment, with great detail. Very moving, compelling book. A little bit of love has the slight feel of being mashed in, but is still satisfactory. Twele Dancing Princesses: YOu know the story. Twelve siters dancing their shoes away. Whoop-dee-doo. The beginning is interesting, but the middle is so darn boring. I tried to read this story 4 times but could not. Overall, I would give this 5 stars, but the Twelve Dancing Princesses didnto deserve it. Read the book though, and if the inly option you have is buying it, mak sure its under $15.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2005

    wow

    this book was really interesting it was a little boring but it turn out great

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