The Dream of Water: A Memoir by Kyoko Mori, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Dream of Water: A Memoir / Edition 1

Dream of Water: A Memoir / Edition 1

3.5 2
by Kyoko Mori
     
 

ISBN-10: 0449910431

ISBN-13: 2900449910435

Pub. Date: 01/28/1996

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

"POETIC . . . REMARKABLY HONEST . . . Mori describes her experiences with an admirable mixture of forthrightness and restraint."
—The Wall Street Journal
In an extraordinary memoir that is both a search for belonging and a search for understanding, Japanese-American author Kyoko Mori travels back to Kobe, Japan, the city of her birth, in an unspoken desire

Overview

"POETIC . . . REMARKABLY HONEST . . . Mori describes her experiences with an admirable mixture of forthrightness and restraint."
—The Wall Street Journal
In an extraordinary memoir that is both a search for belonging and a search for understanding, Japanese-American author Kyoko Mori travels back to Kobe, Japan, the city of her birth, in an unspoken desire to come to terms with the memory of her mother's suicide and the family she left behind thirteen years before.
Throughout her seven-week trip, Kyoko struggles with her ever-present past and the lasting guilt over her mother's death. Although she meets with beloved cousins and other relatives, she agonizes over the frustrating relationship she barely maintains with her fierce father and selfish stepmother. Searching for answers, Kyoko attempts to find a new understanding of what her father is really like, and how it has affected her own place in two distinct worlds. As her time to leave draws near, Kyoko begins to understand that her family connections may be a powerful cry of the heart, but it is the new world that has given her escape from a lonely past and the power to believe in herself.
"[A] COMPELLING MEMOIR . . . LYRICAL."
—Seattle Times-Post Intelligencer
"ASTONISHINGLY BEAUTIFUL . . . Through the clarity filters the beauty of a large heritage that Mori is by now too American to share, but still Japanese enough to appreciate its redeeming value and to be in some measure restored by it."
—Los Angeles Times Book Review
"MAGICAL . . . ENLIGHTENING."
—San Francisco Chronicle

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900449910435
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/28/1996
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
288

Table of Contents

Contents

Title Page,
Copyright Notice,
Dedication,
Distant Water,
Minnows,
Shapes of Land,
Happiness,
Hunger,
The Philosopher's Path,
Purple Orchids,
The Mansion of Broken Dishes,
A Thousand Cranes,
Smoke,
The Child of Wisdom,
Milkstone,
Also by Kyoko Mori,
Copyright,

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The Dream of Water: A Memoir 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I was reading her book, I had to put the book several times. Sometimes I found myself with tear in my eyes. Because it was so painful to me in her situation. I went to back to my home after seven years living in the States. It was the place where I don't have to ask lots of question for direction and I know the name of buildings without question. same ask Kyo-ko did. I decided escape from Seoul when I was seventeen and I am comfortably living here. Taking a trip to seoul was one trip I tried avoid hard until the time. Being there brought lots of good memories and bad memories, specially my abusive father. There was people who love me a lot and concern about my feeling and they made me feel I returned home. There are lots of similarity between Japanese and korean culture. I felt I was no longer one of them. Because how i dress up and how I respond to others. I was not dressed up as my age and was just wearing my jeans and T-shirt like what I do here all the times. I did not care how people will see me like other Koreas do. When my plane was reaching to San Francisco, I felt I am finally returning to the place where I will live last of my life comfortably. I knew Seoul will be just my hometown where I grew up and I will just be able to visit there for time being only. UNderstanding her too much was very painful but I think there are more than one person who also understand her.