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Drowsy Chaperone [Original Broadway Cast Recording]
     

The Drowsy Chaperone [Original Broadway Cast Recording]

4.8 6
by Original Broadway Cast
 
Stage musicals of the 1920s have been the subject of affectionate satire in more recent stage musicals at least since 1954, when The Boy Friend opened in London and New York. So, the idea behind The Drowsy Chaperone isn't exactly new. The only aspect of the idea that is new is the framing device. The curtain goes up on the present-day New York studio

Overview

Stage musicals of the 1920s have been the subject of affectionate satire in more recent stage musicals at least since 1954, when The Boy Friend opened in London and New York. So, the idea behind The Drowsy Chaperone isn't exactly new. The only aspect of the idea that is new is the framing device. The curtain goes up on the present-day New York studio apartment of a middle-aged theater buff who sits in a chair downstage right and explains to the audience that, when he is blue, he likes to play his favorite Broadway cast albums. He then selects from his collection a double-LP set of that 1928 hit The Drowsy Chaperone and puts the first disc on his turntable. (Of course, single, much less double LPs hadn't been invented yet in 1928, and record companies didn't record Broadway cast albums in those days, either, but if you start counting the anachronisms involved with this project at the outset, you're not going to have any fun -- unless you like to count anachronisms, of course.) Magically, the show comes to life right there in his apartment, while he continues to sit in his chair (he is listed in the credits as Man in Chair) and offer a running commentary that includes annotations about the fictional actors playing the characters and his likes and dislikes among the songs and scenes. Such a structure robs the poor critic of much of a function; how can one note that the lyrics to "Bride's Lament" aren't very good when Man in Chair has already instructed listeners to disregard them? Indeed, what point is there in saying that all the songs are just second-rate pastiches of '20s styles when their second-rate nature is fully intended as a source of humor? Broadway never seems to run out of excuses to get dancers into tap shoes and singers into holding long notes, even when those excuses involve making fun of the process itself; not surprisingly, The Drowsy Chaperone nearly swept the Tony Awards after opening on May 1, 2006, though it did lose out on the Best Musical award to Jersey Boys. The original Broadway cast album (which, of course, replicates certain aspects of the central conceit, such as a reproduction of the supposed album cover of the "real" album in the CD booklet) works largely because of the performances. Co-librettist Bob Martin as Man in Chair has just the right nerdy appeal without going overboard into obnoxiousness, and the singers overplay to perfection. Sutton Foster, who has the female lead, is a past master at this kind of thing, having starred previously in the essentially similar Thoroughly Modern Millie, and she makes the best of her big production number, "Show Off" (even though more than half of its effect is lost on those who can only hear it). That sets the tone for such over the top performances as Danny Burstein's Latin lover proclaiming, "I Am Aldolpho" and Beth Leavel (the drowsy chaperone herself) rattling the rafters on "As We Stumble Along." They help make The Drowsy Chaperone what it is, a good old-fashioned Broadway musical, with footnotes.

Editorial Reviews

San Francisco Chronicle
Delightfully loving lampoons of '20s popular styles, from angelic anthems and Middle Eastern exotica to a hot-jazz tap-dance.... A beguiling pleasure. Robert Hurwitt

Product Details

Release Date:
06/06/2006
Label:
Ghostlight
UPC:
0791558441123
catalogNumber:
84411
Rank:
10693

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Original Cast Recording   Primary Artist
Dave Stahl   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
Steve Armour   Trombone
Jack Cavari   Drums
Glenn Drewes   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
Ron Jannelli   Clarinet,Reeds,Bassoon,Bass Clarinet,Baritone Saxophone
Tom Murray   Clarinet,Flute,Reeds,Piccolo,Alto Saxophone,Soprano Saxophone
Ed Hamilton   Banjo,Guitar,Ukulele
Ed Joffe   Clarinet,Flute,Reeds,Piccolo,Alto Saxophone,Soprano Saxophone
Perry J. Cavari   Drums
Eddie Korbich   Vocals
Jeremy Miloszewicz   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
Lenny Wolpe   Vocals
Tom Christensen   Clarinet,Reeds,English Horn,Oboe,Tenor Saxophone
Jay Douglas   Vocals
Lawrence Goldberg   Keyboards
Bob Martin   Vocals
Danny Burstein   Vocals
Beth Leavel   Vocals
Edward Hamilton   Banjo,Guitar,Ukulele
Jeff Nelson & Covenant   Trombone
Sutton Foster   Vocals
Kitty Reidy   Vocals
David Stahl   Trumpet,Flugelhorn
Stacia Fernandez   Vocals
Andrea Chamberlain   Vocals
Patrick Wetzel   Vocals
Matt Perri   Piano,Keyboards
Phil Reno   Conductor
Angela Pupello   Vocals
Bob Martin   Vocals
Edward Hibbert   Vocals
Georgia Engel   Vocals
Troy Britton Johnson   Vocals
Jeff Nelson   Trombone
Linda Griffin   Vocals
Jason Kravits   Vocals
Tom Murray   Clarinet,Flute,Reeds,Piccolo,Alto Saxophone,Soprano Saxophone
Garth Kravits   Vocals
Kilty Reidy   Vocals
Mike Keunnen   Upright Bass
Joey Sarge   Vocals
Kecia Lewis-Evans   Vocals
Bill Hayes   Percussion
Jennifer Smith   Vocals

Technical Credits

Joel Moss   Producer,Engineering
Sally Cato   Art Direction
Ed Hamilton   Contributor
Joan Marcus   Production Photography
Carol Rosegg   Production Photography
Bob Martin   Book
Don McKellar   Book
Edward Hamilton   Contributor
Kurt Deutsch   Producer,Executive Producer
Kevin McCollum   Liner Notes
Greg Morrison   Composer
Lisa Lambert   Composer,Lyricist
Phil Reno   Producer
Sidney Stein   Liner Notes
Greg Morrison   Lyricist
Bob Martin   Book
David Goldsmith   Plot Synopsis

Customer Reviews

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The Drowsy Chaperone [Original Broadway Cast Recording] 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I saw this outrageously original, hilarious and exquisite musical within a comedy this evening and loved it. Brilliant. Do yourself a favor and get to the theater now.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this show is the funniest show i have ever witnessed in my life. it has a perfect combination of wittiness, romance, extravagent dancing, satire, randomness, and just pure COMEDY!!! I very much recommend this musical many people havent heard about it but they SHOULD because it is EXCELLENT
Guest More than 1 year ago
So, at first I thought the cast recording was 'so -so' but I am officially obsessed. Sad? yes. I'm a 15 -year old Broadway freak. Jersey Boys? So not worthy of a tony for best new musical. but sutton foster and the rest of the gang... maybe i'll consider. xo xo
DaveO More than 1 year ago
I bought tickets to this show as a Valentine's Day present for my wife and she said it was one of the best gifts I have ever given her! She absolutely loved it (and so did I). The show is hilarious and the songs are wonderful Be prepared to laugh during the entire show and to be thoroughly entertained. One of the best musicals I have ever seen.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Even though the soundtrack to this bright, bubbly and simply amazing new musical hasn't hit the shelves yet, I just have to say what a great show it is. I don't think that I've ever laughed as hard as I did when I saw "The Drowsy Chaperone." This show leaves you with nothing except catchy tunes in your head and pains in your sides from laughter. This new musical deffinitely curbs your musical comedy appetite
Anonymous More than 1 year ago