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The Duff Cooper Diaries: 1915-1951
     

The Duff Cooper Diaries: 1915-1951

5.0 1
by John Julius Norwich, Duff Cooper
 

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A witness to numerous significant events from 1914 to 1950, the life of Duff Cooper is explored in full in this collection of diaries. From life as a young soldier at the end of World War I, as a politician during the General Strike of 1926, as King Edward VIII's friend at the time of the Abdication, and to Paris after being liberated in 1944 when he became British

Overview

A witness to numerous significant events from 1914 to 1950, the life of Duff Cooper is explored in full in this collection of diaries. From life as a young soldier at the end of World War I, as a politician during the General Strike of 1926, as King Edward VIII's friend at the time of the Abdication, and to Paris after being liberated in 1944 when he became British ambassador, this reveling and insightful resource is superbly edited by Cooper’s son, John Julius Norwich, whose familial link ensures all kinds of additional information as footnotes. With additional details on Cooper’s numerous, public love affairs, this enthralling diary captures history as it was being made.

Editorial Reviews

The Atlantic
Deliver[s] Cooper's intimate, usually spot-on assessments.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780297848431
Publisher:
Orion Publishing Group, Limited
Publication date:
09/28/2007
Pages:
496
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.90(d)

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The Duff Cooper Diaries: 1915-1951 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Beirut768 More than 1 year ago
Duff Cooper's name is associated with two main tempestuous events.

He played a remarkable role during the Egyptian crises of the early 1920s. Saad Zaghlul - prominent Egyptian Lawyer and Prime Minister - demanded at the head of Wafd Party, independence for Egypt but the British arrested him to weaken the nationalist movement.
Britain's action sparked civil unrest degenerating to debauchery and unrestrained violence. About 1000 Egyptians were killed in one month when the British decided to deport Zaghlul to Malta.
That was what Egyptians call the 1919 First Revolution.
Cooper interfered with the British authorities in London and was able to convince his government to back down; Saad Zaghlul was released and returned to Egypt.
The Wafd `Delegation' arrived in Paris and presented its case, at Versailles' Peace Conference - post WWI - for immediate independence.
What Cooper succeeded in preserving as authentic support for Zaghlul, was ruined when the United States - the Champion of Wilson's 14 points - ended up backing Great Britain, and the British Protectorate over Egypt continued for thirty five more years.


Cooper was adamantly against Munich agreement signed in 1938 with Adolph Hitler. He was a staunch critic of Neville Chamberlain policy of `appeasement' and played active role that led to Chamberlain's downfall. This appears quite interesting considering Cooper's great admiration of `Talleyrand' - known as widely controversial and equivocal in European history -. Chamberlain was not naïve, he was another Talleyrand but his cohorts never noticed.
In 1943, under Winston Churchill, Cooper was appointed Britain's liaison to the Free French.
By 1944 he became Ambassador to France.
The city of `love and romanticism' flourished intimate relationships with wives of foreign diplomats. His wife, Lady Diana Cooper, had fostered intimate relationship with the American Ambassador in Paris. Cooper was no exception; he too had `special' relationship with the wife of `an' American diplomat and it is said they had illegitimate son.

While the soldiers were fighting, the diplomats were flirting. (better not to use another word !!!!)