The Duties of Parents by J.C. Ryle | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Duties of Parents

The Duties of Parents

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by J. C. Ryle
     
 

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J. C. Ryle’s concise, commonsense guide to the raising of children has stood the test of time. He employs his deep understanding of scripture to distill the Bible’s teaching on the duties of parents into seventeen powerful principles:

1. First, then, if you would train your children rightly, train them in the way they should go, and not in the way

Overview

J. C. Ryle’s concise, commonsense guide to the raising of children has stood the test of time. He employs his deep understanding of scripture to distill the Bible’s teaching on the duties of parents into seventeen powerful principles:

1. First, then, if you would train your children rightly, train them in the way they should go, and not in the way that they would.

2. Train up your child with all tenderness, affection, and patience.

3. Train your children with an abiding persuasion on your mind that much depends upon you.

4. Train with this thought continually before your eyes — that the soul of your child is the first thing to be considered.

5. Train your child to a knowledge of the Bible.

6. Train them to a habit of prayer.

7. Train them to habits of diligence, and regularity about public means of grace.

8. Train them to a habit of faith.

9. Train them to a habit of obedience.

10. Train them to a habit of always speaking the truth.

11. Train them to a habit of always redeeming the time.

12. Train them with a constant fear of overindulgence.

13. Train them remembering continually how God trains His children.

14. Train them remembering continually the influence of your own example.

15. Train them remembering continually the power of sin.

16. Train them remembering continually the promises of Scripture.

17. Train them, lastly, with continual prayer for a blessing on all you do.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612036779
Publisher:
Bottom of the Hill Publishing
Publication date:
10/01/2012
Pages:
82
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.17(d)

Meet the Author

John Charles Ryle (1816-1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. Ryle was born at Macclesfield, and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he was Craven Scholar in 1836. After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880). However before taking the latter office, he was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft. His appointment to Liverpool was at the recommendation of the outgoing Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school and a critic of Ritualism. He was a writer, pastor and an evangelical preacher. Among his longer works are Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century (1869), Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (7 vols, 1856-69), Principles for Churchmen (1884). Ryle was an athlete who rowed and played Cricket for Oxford, where he took a first class degree in Greats and was offered a college fellowship (teaching position) which he declined. The son of a wealthy banker, he was destined for a career in politics before choosing a path of ordained ministry. While hearing Ephesians 2 read in church in 1838, he felt a spiritual awakening and was ordained by Bishop Sumner at Winchester in 1842. For 38 years he was a parish vicar, first at Helmingham and later at Stradbrooke, in Suffolk. He became a leader of the evangelical party in the Church of England and was noted for his doctrinal essays and polemical writings. In 1880, at age 64, he became the first bishop of Liverpool, at the recommendation of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. He retired in 1900 at age 83 and died later the same year. He is buried in the All Saints' Church, Childwall, Liverpool. In his diocese, he formed a clergy pension fund for his diocese and built over forty churches. Controversially, he emphasized raising clergy salaries ahead of building a cathedral for his new diocese. Ryle was described as having a commanding presence and vigorous in advocating his principles albeit with a warm disposition. He was also credited with having success in evangelizing the blue collar community.

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