The Duty of Self-Denial

The Duty of Self-Denial

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by Thomas Watson
     
 

Christian Reader,
The weightiness of the argument here discoursed on justly merits a larger volume. But I have contracted it because it may possibly come into more hands. I must profess I do not know a more necessary point in divinity. Self denial is the first principle of Christianity. It is the life-blood which must run through the whole body of religion. Self … See more details below

Overview

Christian Reader,
The weightiness of the argument here discoursed on justly merits a larger volume. But I have contracted it because it may possibly come into more hands. I must profess I do not know a more necessary point in divinity. Self denial is the first principle of Christianity. It is the life-blood which must run through the whole body of religion. Self -denial is learned not out of the topics of philosophy but the oracles of Scripture.
It is my request to the reader to pursue this manual with seriousness, knowing that the practice of self-denial is that wherein his salvation is nearly concerned. May the Lord work with His Word and cause the dew of His blessing to fall with this manna, which is the prayer of,

Thy Friend and Servant in the Gospel,
Thomas Watson
Dowgate, 1675

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011820182
Publisher:
Watson Books
Publication date:
10/08/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,244,810
File size:
0 MB

Meet the Author

THOMAS WATSON (1620-1686) All of Thomas Watson's writings and sermons are replete with sound doctrine, practical wisdom, and heart-searching application. His profound spirituality, gripping remarks, practical illustrations, and beauty of expression make him one of the most irresistible of the Puritans. He was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he was noted for remarkably hard study. In 1646 he was commenced a sixteen year pastorate at St. Stephen's Walbrook. In 1651 he was imprisoned briefly with some other ministers for his share in Christopher Love's plot to recall Charles II. He was released on 30th June,1652, and was formally reinstated vicar of St. Stephen's Walbrook. He obtained great fame and popularity as preacher until the Restoration, when he was ejected for nonconformity. Notwithstanding the rigor of the acts against dissenters, Watson continued to exercise his ministry privately as he found opportunity. Upon the Declaration of Indulgence in 1672 he obtained a license for the great hall in Crosby House. After preaching there for several years, his health gave way, and he retired to Barnston in Essex, where he died suddenly while praying in secret. He was buried on 28th July, 1686.

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