The Early Negro Convention Movement

The Early Negro Convention Movement

by JOHN W. CROMWELL
     
 

The American Negro Academy OCCASIONAL PAPERS NO. 9.
The Early Negro Convention Movement BY JOHN W. CROMWELL

"With the period immediately following the Second War with Great Britain, begins a series of events which indicate a purpose of the nation to make the condition of the free man of color an inferior status socially and politically. That this was… See more details below

Overview

The American Negro Academy OCCASIONAL PAPERS NO. 9.
The Early Negro Convention Movement BY JOHN W. CROMWELL

"With the period immediately following the Second War with Great Britain, begins a series of events which indicate a purpose of the nation to make the condition of the free man of color an inferior status socially and politically. That this was resisted at every step, revealed the national aim and purpose.

The protest against prescription in the Church which had asserted itself in several instances as at St. James P. E. and Bethel in Philadelphia, Zion in New York, culminated in the organization of two independent denominations—in 1816 at Philadelphia, in 1820 at New York.

The American Colonization Society was organized in 1816 with the hidden purpose of strengthening slavery by ridding the country of its free black population. In 1820 the passage of the Missouri Compromise permitted the westward extension of slavery and as far north as 36° 30′."

John Wesley Cromwell (1846-1927), journalist and educator, was born into slavery in Portsmouth, Virginia on September 5, 1846. After receiving freedom, Cromwell and his family moved to Philadelphia. In 1865, Cromwell returned to Portsmouth to open a private school, which failed due to racial harassment. Cromwell entered Howard University in Washington, D. C. in 1871. He received a law degree and was admitted to the bar in 1874. Cromwell was the first African American to practice law for the Interstate Commerce Commission.

Cromwell founded the weekly paper The People's Advocate in 1876. In 1881, Cromwell was elected President of Bethel Library and Historical Association in Washington, D. C. Cromwell used this position to generate interest in African American history. He inspired the foundation of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in 1915. He died on April 14, 1927.

Karen Ruffle

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012709486
Publisher:
Classics Press
Publication date:
11/27/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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