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The Earth Moves: Galileo and the Roman Inquisition

Overview

A cogent portrayal of a turning point in the evolution of the freedom of thought and the beginnings of modern science.
Celebrated, controversial, condemned, Galileo Galilei is a seminal figure in the history of science. Both Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein credit him as the first modern scientist. His 1633 trial before the Holy Office of the Inquisition is the prime drama in the history of the conflict between science and religion.
Galileo ...

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The Earth Moves: Galileo and the Roman Inquisition (Great Discoveries)

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Overview

A cogent portrayal of a turning point in the evolution of the freedom of thought and the beginnings of modern science.
Celebrated, controversial, condemned, Galileo Galilei is a seminal figure in the history of science. Both Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein credit him as the first modern scientist. His 1633 trial before the Holy Office of the Inquisition is the prime drama in the history of the conflict between science and religion.
Galileo was then sixty-nine years old and the most venerated scientist in Italy. Although subscribing to an anti-literalist view of the Bible, as per Saint Augustine, Galileo considered himself a believing Catholic.
Playing to his own strengths—a deep knowledge of Italy, a longstanding interest in Renaissance and Baroque lore—Dan Hofstadter explains this apparent paradox and limns this historic moment in the widest cultural context, portraying Galileo as both humanist and scientist, deeply versed in philosophy and poetry, on easy terms with musicians, writers, and painters.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Hofstadter (Falling Palace: A Romance of Naples) draws upon his intimate knowledge of Italian culture, literature and art-as well as new material released from Vatican archives-for this political, scientific and psychological examination of the "first great clash of religion and science," between Galileo and Pope Urban VIII, two seminal figures who were, incredibly, once friends. The context for Galileo's 1633 trial involved political and scientific upheavals involving better technology (Galileo's major improvements on the telescope) and a 1616 Church edict against heliocentrism meant to protect the Scripture from the free interpretation of laypeople. Despite the political cost, Galileo produced a philosophic treatise on the subject, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief Systems (originally licensed for publication by the Church) that championed the "banned hypothesis thesis" and suggested that astronomical references in scripture were metaphorical. Hofstadter tells the concise, absorbing tale of Galileo's persecution with both sides of the conflict in mind, charting with grace the genesis of the Western world's most persistent ideological divide.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393338201
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/10/2010
  • Series: Great Discoveries Series
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 971,436
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Dan Hofstadter is the author of The Earth Moves and Falling Palace: A Romance of Naples (a finalist for the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of the Memoir). He has lived in Florence and Naples and speaks and reads Italian fluently. He lives in Rensselaerville, New York.

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Table of Contents

Author's Note 11

Prologue: The Summons 17

1 Galileo Galilei and Maffeo Barberini 27

2 The Telescope; or, Seeing 53

3 The Trial; or, Not Seeing 134

Epilogue: Invidia 198

Notes 212

Selected Bibliography 226

Illustration Credits 232

Index 233

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 9, 2012

    An excellent, focused, sophisticated study of the combustible mi

    An excellent, focused, sophisticated study of the combustible mixture of politics, religion and science that led to the prosecution and punishment of the genius Galileo.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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