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The Economics of Information in the Networked Environment
     

The Economics of Information in the Networked Environment

by Bruce Kingma, Meredith A Butler
 
The age of digital librarianship is here to stay, and if you're interested in keeping the operating costs of your information provision within certain workable parameters, then you'll want to tap into the direction and futuristic vision in The Economics of Information in the Networked Environment. In this collection of addresses and papers by world-renowned experts on

Overview

The age of digital librarianship is here to stay, and if you're interested in keeping the operating costs of your information provision within certain workable parameters, then you'll want to tap into the direction and futuristic vision in The Economics of Information in the Networked Environment. In this collection of addresses and papers by world-renowned experts on the subject of contemporary librarianship, you'll see how information professionals around the globe are coping with an ever-expanding knowledge base, given their current economic constraints and budgets.

The Economics of Information in the Networked Environment comes to you on the many new waves of technology that have made it possible to access the largest base of digital information to date. You'll come to grips with the ever-looming questions of cost and expense in this rapidly changing and diversifying information arena, and you'll adopt sound plans for an economically stable means of keeping your own library in high operation. Specifically, you'll discover important direction relating to this prevalent concern, including:

  • challenging marketplace solutions to problems in the economics of information
  • economic modeling of investments in information resources at academic institutions
  • case studies in transforming the scholarly process
  • the salvific potential of e-serials
  • the economics of resource sharing, consortia, and document delivery
  • measuring costs and benefits of distance learning

    It's true that with increased efficiency and technological development comes an increase in cost—and the world's libraries are no exception. In reading The Economics of Information in the Networked Environment, you'll become better equipped to deal with the financial strains the new waves of technological advancement have put on your current methods of information acquisition.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Millard Johnson(Indiana Cooperative Library Services Authority)
Description: This is a collection of papers from an ARL conference held in Washington, DC in 1995. The same material is available in the Journal of Library Administration, Volume 26 Numbers 1/2 1998 and as a monograph published by the Association of Research Libraries (www.arl.org/pubscat/title.htm).
Purpose: The rising cost of library materials has led libraries to join together and use new technologies to try to maintain services while reducing increases in costs. But are libraries' efforts successful? If some libraries cancel subscriptions, do publishers simply raise the costs to continuing subscribers? Is extensive, systematic borrowing truly cheaper than ownership, or is it merely a matter of paying from another pocket? To answer questions about the cost effectiveness of various "resource sharing" practices, as well as to present the fundamental economics of information management in the networked age, the ARL convened a conference of experts in economics, network technology, and library practice.
Audience: The book is intended for librarians who have responsibility for decisions concerning participation in cooperative network activities intended to reduce costs to libraries or increase library services through cooperative library practices.
Features: As usual with printed conference proceedings, the papers are of uneven quality — some of the papers are omitted because speakers did not submit or withheld their copy. Some papers by economists attempt to tie economic theory to the library and Internet environment. Some papers by librarians simply describe systems in operation or planned. Still other papers make predictions about what will or might happen as a result of emerging technology and library cooperative efforts.
Assessment: Although the papers included in this work were written more than four years ago, the book contains useful information on the full spectrum of problems confronting a profession seeking to contain costs and use information technology cooperatively to provide better service.
3 Stars from Doody
Millard Johnson
This is a collection of papers from an ARL conference held in Washington, DC in 1995. The same material is available in the Journal of Library Administration, Volume 26 Numbers 1/2 1998 and as a monograph published by the Association of Research Libraries (www.arl.org/pubscat/title.htm). The rising cost of library materials has led libraries to join together and use new technologies to try to maintain services while reducing increases in costs. But are libraries' efforts successful? If some libraries cancel subscriptions, do publishers simply raise the costs to continuing subscribers? Is extensive, systematic borrowing truly cheaper than ownership, or is it merely a matter of paying from another pocket? To answer questions about the cost effectiveness of various ""resource sharing"" practices, as well as to present the fundamental economics of information management in the networked age, the ARL convened a conference of experts in economics, network technology, and library practice. The book is intended for librarians who have responsibility for decisions concerning participation in cooperative network activities intended to reduce costs to libraries or increase library services through cooperative library practices. As usual with printed conference proceedings, the papers are of uneven quality -- some of the papers are omitted because speakers did not submit or withheld their copy. Some papers by economists attempt to tie economic theory to the library and Internet environment. Some papers by librarians simply describe systems in operation or planned. Still other papers make predictions about what will or might happen as a result of emerging technology and librarycooperative efforts. Although the papers included in this work were written more than four years ago, the book contains useful information on the full spectrum of problems confronting a profession seeking to contain costs and use information technology cooperatively to provide better service.
Booknews
Originally published in 1996 by the Association of Research Libraries as conference proceedings and currently co-published as v.26, no.1/2 1998. Presents papers addressing many of the digital information cost issues that affect libraries, including electronic publishing, intellectual property rights, resource sharing, document delivery, and institutional investment in digital resources. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789006592
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
01/28/1998
Pages:
338
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.00(d)

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