The Economics of Open Source Software Development

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$120.86
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $139.30
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (1) from $139.30   
  • New (1) from $139.30   

Overview

Open Source Software (OSS) development appears to present a stark contrast to traditional production and innovation methods and an unlikely contestant in the marketplace. Some of the most striking features are that OSS development is based on contributions of volunteer programmers, that these programmers only associated with each other through informal communities, that the resulting software products are made available for free, and that this unconventional development method is able to produce software of high complexity and extraordinary quality.
Obviously, the emergence of software has fundamentally changed the software business. The simple facts that production is carried out by voluntary private programmers and that the marketable outcomes are supplied to consumers for free, have resulted in far-reaching effects on market structures, business models, and innovation processes in the software industry. While incumbents had to adapt their strategies to this newly emerging competition, OSS-based firms had to develop viable business models enabling them to generate profits. These fundamental changes in the software industry have subsequently attracted the interest of analysts, business people and research in economics and management science.

*This book fills a substantial gap in this field
*Serves as an invaluable reference for all those interested in OSS
*The information is broad in scope
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780444527691
  • Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/4/2006
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Table of Contents

1. The economics of Open Source Software development: An introduction
2. Decoding the Free/Open Source Software puzzle: A survey of theoretical and empirical contributions
3. Open Source Software: Free provision of complex public goods
4. Intrinsic motivations and profit-oriented firms in Open Source software. Do firms practise what they preach?
5. Business models and community relationships of open source software firms
6. A statistical analysis of defects in Debian and strategies for improving quality in free software projects
7. Coworker governance in Open-Source projects
8. Bounty programs in free/libre/open source software (FLOSS)
9. An organizational perspective on Free and Open Source Software development
10. Linux vs. Windows: A comparison of applicaiton and platform innovation incentives for open Source and proprietary software platforms
11. The impact of entry and competition of Open Source Software on innovation activity
12. Application of social network analysis to the study of Open Source Software
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)