The Economy of Renaissance Florence [NOOK Book]

Overview

Richard A. Goldthwaite, a leading economic historian of the Italian Renaissance, has spent his career studying the Florentine economy. In this magisterial work, Goldthwaite brings together a lifetime of research and insight on the subject, clarifying and explaining the complex workings of Florence’s commercial, banking, and artisan sectors.

Florence was one of the most industrialized cities in medieval Europe, thanks to its thriving textile industries. The importation of raw ...

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The Economy of Renaissance Florence

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Overview

Richard A. Goldthwaite, a leading economic historian of the Italian Renaissance, has spent his career studying the Florentine economy. In this magisterial work, Goldthwaite brings together a lifetime of research and insight on the subject, clarifying and explaining the complex workings of Florence’s commercial, banking, and artisan sectors.

Florence was one of the most industrialized cities in medieval Europe, thanks to its thriving textile industries. The importation of raw materials and the exportation of finished cloth necessitated the creation of commercial and banking practices that extended far beyond Florence’s boundaries. Part I situates Florence within this wider international context and describes the commercial and banking networks through which the city's merchant-bankers operated. Part II focuses on the urban economy of Florence itself, including various industries, merchants, artisans, and investors. It also evaluates the role of government in the economy, the relationship of the urban economy to the region, and the distribution of wealth throughout the society.

While political, social, and cultural histories of Florence abound, none focuses solely on the economic history of the city. The Economy of Renaissance Florence offers both a systematic description of the city's major economic activities and a comprehensive overview of its economic development from the late Middle Ages through the Renaissance to 1600.

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Editorial Reviews

Renaissance Quarterly
Johns Hopkins University Press deserves praise for having so ably edited and published such a big book in this age of contraction and cost-cutting. It and the author have given us one of the most important books in Renaissance history to have appeared in many years: not simply a long-needed synthesis but a stimulating, insightful work that will guide research for a long time to come.

— Robert S. DuPlessis

Economist
Richard Goldthwaite has served a long apprenticeship. As a dedicated student of the economy of Florence between the 13th and 16th centuries, he has published studies of the city's buildings and banks, its private wealth and the demand for its art. Now he has stood back and produced a magisterial history which brings all the strands of the story together and becomes, among its other virtues, a persuasive account of early capitalism.
Canadian Journal of History
Masterful. So thorough, so inclusive, and so wide-ranging that its omission from the bibliography of on any future study on the Italian Renaissance will be a noticeable oversight.

— Brian Maxson

Journal of Modern History
It is hard to do justice to so large, complex, and informative a work. A synthesis of the Florentine economy is a monumental undertaking. Goldthwaite offers a compelling image, which, like all such images, will draw its critics and admirers and set the parameters of the field for decades.

— Thomas Kuehn

Washington Post Book World
Renaissance Florence has no more able defender in recent times than Professor Richard Goldthwaite.
European History Quarterly
A highly readable, lashivly detailed study that much become essential reading.

— Nicholas Scott Baker

Journal of World History
An important model that will be impossible for any future student of Florence's economic history to ignore.

— Franca R. Barricelli

Renaissance and Reformation
This book is essential reading not only for economic historians... but also for historians of Renaissance Florence generally. The Economy of Renaissance Florence will remain an indispensable point of reference and departure for research in the field for decades to come.

— Lawrin Armstrong

Chronique
Few people who know so much write so attractively as [Goldthwaite]. Take him as a model.
Renaissance Quarterly - Robert S. DuPlessis
Johns Hopkins University Press deserves praise for having so ably edited and published such a big book in this age of contraction and cost-cutting. It and the author have given us one of the most important books in Renaissance history to have appeared in many years: not simply a long-needed synthesis but a stimulating, insightful work that will guide research for a long time to come.
H-Italy, H-Net Reviews - Nicola Jones
This book marks a crowning achievement of a distinguished academic career, and it achieves both authority in its exposition and modesty in its tone. An essential read for scholars interested in the study of Florence, and historical economics.
Journal of Modern History - Thomas Kuehn
It is hard to do justice to so large, complex, and informative a work. A synthesis of the Florentine economy is a monumental undertaking. Goldthwaite offers a compelling image, which, like all such images, will draw its critics and admirers and set the parameters of the field for decades.
Canadian Journal of History - Brian Maxson
Masterful. So thorough, so inclusive, and so wide-ranging that its omission from the bibliography of on any future study on the Italian Renaissance will be a noticeable oversight.
European History Quarterly - Nicholas Scott Baker
A highly readable, lashivly detailed study that much become essential reading.
Journal of World History - Franca R. Barricelli
An important model that will be impossible for any future student of Florence's economic history to ignore.
Renaissance and Reformation - Lawrin Armstrong
This book is essential reading not only for economic historians... but also for historians of Renaissance Florence generally. The Economy of Renaissance Florence will remain an indispensable point of reference and departure for research in the field for decades to come.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801896880
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 2/13/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 672
  • Sales rank: 939,872
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Richard A. Goldthwaite is professor emeritus of history at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of The Building of Renaissance Florence: An Economic and Social History and Wealth and the Demand for Art in Italy, 1300–1600, both also published by Johns Hopkins.

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Table of Contents

Introduction The commercial revolution 3

1 The network 37

2 The shifting geography of commerce 126

3 Banking and finance 203

4 The textile industries 265

5 Artisans, shopkeepers, workers 341

6 Banking and credit 408

7 Contexts 484

Conclusion 583

App Changing values of the florin 609

Index 615

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