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The Elements of Style: An Encyclopedia of Domestic Architectural Detail
     

The Elements of Style: An Encyclopedia of Domestic Architectural Detail

by Stephen Calloway (Editor), Alan Powers (Editor), Elizabeth Cromley (Editor)
 

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Praise for previous editions:
One of the most borrowed books in our library.
—This Old house

A dizzying amount of detailed pictorial information ... clearly and fascinatingly captioned.
—World of Interiors

The Elements of Style is the most comprehensive visual survey, period by period, feature by

Overview

Praise for previous editions:
One of the most borrowed books in our library.
—This Old house

A dizzying amount of detailed pictorial information ... clearly and fascinatingly captioned.
—World of Interiors

The Elements of Style is the most comprehensive visual survey, period by period, feature by feature, of the key styles in American and British domestic architecture from the Tudor period to present day. A valuable reference guide, the book is designed for owners of period houses, restorers, architects, interior designers and all those interested in our architectural heritage. This revised edition includes a fully updated chapter covering the Contemporary era (1975—present) and a new list of suppliers and resources.

More than 3,000 analytical drawings and historical engravings, 500 color and 1,000 black-and-white photographs provide a clearly presented guide to the features appropriate for every part of a building. Major components, such as doors, windows, walls, floors, ceilings and staircases, the small but important embellishments, such as molding and door hardware, and permanent or semi-permanent fixtures, such as lighting and wallcoverings, populate this wide-ranging encyclopedic resource.

A system of color-coded tabs enables the reader to compare specific features as they have evolved over time. Additional information on restoration and maintenance, biographies of key architects, and a detailed glossary are included.

Periods covered:
Tudor and Jacobean (1485-1625)
Baroque (1625-1714)
Early Georgian (1714-1765)
Colonial (1607-1780)
Late Georgian (1765-1811)
Regency and Early 19th Century (1811-1837)

Federal and Empire (1780-1850)
British Victorian (1837-1901)
American Victorian (1840-1910)
Arts and Crafts (1860-1925)
Art Nouveau (1888-1905)
Edwardian (1901-1914)
American Beaux Arts (1870-1920)
Twenties and Thirties
The Modern Movement (1920-1950)
Beyond Modern (1950-1975)
Contemporary Era (1975-present)

Editorial Reviews

This Old House
[Review for previous edition] One of the most borrowed books in our library... Not sure which light fixtures complement a Craftsman? You'll find out here.
Choice
Singular in its presentation, scope, and comprehensiveness.... a staple for any university library with an architecture or interior design department. Recommended.
Fine Homebuilding
[Review for previous edition] Recommended title by the staff of Fine Homebuilding, Special Anniversary edition
Globe and Mail
[Review for previous edition] A welcome addition to the coffee tables or libraries of professional designers, architecture buffs and, for that matter, anyone who has even a passing interest in how homes have evolved over the centuries.
Western Roofing
[Review for previous edition] An indispensable tool for architects, designers, historians, or indeed anyone interested in residential design and the history of domestic architecture... Domestic architectural detail can inspire with beauty and grace.
Choice - R.T. Clement
[Review for previous edition] An outstanding and economical single-volume resource... Summing Up Highly recommended.
Globe and Mail - Jane Gadd
[Review for previous edition] Visual feast of domestic architectural styles... It is truly a scholarly work, but also an accessible one that can be enjoyed by anyone who appreciates beautiful design or is intrigued by the domestic lives of past generations... extraordinary detail.
Style at Home - Jenn Houlihan
[Review for previous edition] A perfect gift for the architecture junkie in your life... color-coded tabs for quick reference to 500 years of architectural details and styles with illustrations and photographs.
Arlington Heights Daily Herald - Deborah Donovan
[Review for previous edition] Great for someone restoring a period home because it tells what fits a certain style and what doesn't... would give someone planning a home a lot of looks and styles to consider.
Montreal Gazette - Cheryl Cornacchia
[Review for previous edition] Essentially a reference volume, but a pleasurable one to read... every page is peppered with color photographs, line drawings and black-and-white archival images that bring the architectural elements to life.
Toronto Star - Peggy Mackenzie
[Review for previous edition] No detail is overlooked... A necessary reference work for those interested in residential architectural history. It's pleasurable eye candy for everyone else.
Library Journal
Calloway (curator of prints, Victoria and Albert Museum), assisted by a dozen other style experts from both sides of the Atlantic, addresses the concerns of amateur and professional preservationists with the new edition of this guide to period styles in Great Britain and the United States from the Renaissance to the present. Each chapter begins with a concise overview of a period style (e.g., Colonial, Baroque, Edwardian Beaux Arts) and is followed by pages teeming with illustrations of representative doors, windows, fireplaces, and other structural/decorative elements. The stylistic analyses are sometimes questionable-e.g., Wright's Robie House as Art Nouveau?-but generally succeed in capturing each period in lively and penetrating detail. Reviews of the first two editions acclaimed Elements as an exhaustive, brilliantly illustrated handbook and this new edition differs but slightly from the earlier two. Its directories of British and North American suppliers are updated and the coverage of post-1920 Modernism, the weakest and most problematic subject in all three editions, has been revised and expanded. An excellent reference for libraries serving active historic preservationists, but other libraries owning earlier editions need not splurge.-David Solt sz, Cuyahoga Cty. P.L., Parma, OH Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Arlington Heights Daily Herald
Great for someone restoring a period home because it tells what fits a certain style and what doesn't.
— Deborah Donovan
Montreal Gazette
Essentially a reference volume, but a pleasurable one to read... images that bring the architectural elements to life.
— Cheryl Cornacchia
Toronto Star
A necessary reference work for those interested in residential architectural history. It's pleasurable eye candy for everyone else.
— Peggy Mackenzie
Style at Home
A perfect gift for the architecture junkie in your life... quick reference to 500 years of architectural details and styles.
— Jenn Houlihan

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770850866
Publisher:
Firefly Books, Limited
Publication date:
06/19/2012
Edition description:
Fourth Edition
Pages:
592
Sales rank:
454,206
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 1.60(d)

Meet the Author

Stephen Calloway is Curator of Prints and Books at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, and author, lecturer and consultant on architecture, interior design and the history of taste. He has contributed to numerous periodicals, including The World of Interiors and Architectural Digest, and is the author of Twentieth-Century Design and Baroque Baroque.

Alan Powers is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Greenwich School of Architecture and Landscape, London. He is the author of several books on English architecture and decorative arts, including Living with Books, and is a regular contributor to Country Life and other magazines.

Elizabeth Cromley is Professor of Architecture at Northeastern University, Boston. She is the author of Alone Together: A History of New York's Early
Apartments
, and co-editor of a variety of essays and books on vernacular architecture.

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