Elephant in the Room

The Elephant in the Room

by Fat Joe
     
 

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If the title The Elephant in the Room represents anything, it's Fat Joe's solid and reliable talent. It can't refer to the rapper himself because the man gets press by the pallet, but if you sift through all the beef talk and the chump accusations you'll have a hard time matching it up with his output. Objectively, he's never embarrassed himself, and the…  See more details below

Overview

If the title The Elephant in the Room represents anything, it's Fat Joe's solid and reliable talent. It can't refer to the rapper himself because the man gets press by the pallet, but if you sift through all the beef talk and the chump accusations you'll have a hard time matching it up with his output. Objectively, he's never embarrassed himself, and the behemoth-sized boasts he makes are all over gangsta rap, yet rarely backed up by the number of gold records Joe has on his wall. He's a survivor, a smart captain with prot�g�s Terror Squad and DJ Khaled his crowning achievements, and for all these things he deserves respect. What's fascinating about The Elephant in the Room is that it doesn't hunger for adoration or accolades but it obsesses on acknowledgement, the lack of which puts an all-day knot in Joe's stomach. Rather than rely on the one or two quick-witted jabs he usually drops in a verse, here the rapper uses a slowly corrosive approach and wears down all enemies with a slower but ever so steady grind. Violent imagery is important to get the job done, and when the visceral highlight "300 Brolic" decides killing your mom wasn't enough, it offers "I am a professional/I will cut your testicles/Stuff 'em in your mouth where them li'l shits belong." Joe's driven enough that he actually breaks away from his usual monotone delivery and makes "Bumpin' that Kanye/You can't tell me nuthin' riiiiiiiiight?" a layered lyric through his snarky, indignant inflection. The few radio-friendly numbers included somehow work in this environment, with the J. Holiday collaboration "I Won't Tell" bringing especially sweet relief. Towering above it all is "My Conscience," where KRS-One plays the supportive angel on Joe's shoulder and offers "You was with Relativity/I was with Jive/All that bullshit you been through/How'd you survive," both a hip-hop history and frame of reference. Where Elephant falls off is with all the excessive cocaine talk -- which just seems to be taking away from the matter at hand -- plus the star-studded list of producers -- the Alchemist, Scott Storch, Swizz Beatz -- and their failure to match the rapper's enthusiasm. Still, Joe warns the listener right at the beginning that he's more Eazy-E than Ice Cube -- and for three-fourths of the album, he's spot on.

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Product Details

Release Date:
03/11/2008
Label:
Virgin Records Us
UPC:
5099951461928
catalogNumber:
14619

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Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Fat Joe   Primary Artist
Dré   Vocals
Infamous   Keyboards
Ed "Wolverine" Goldstein   Bass
Kiethen Pittman   Keyboards

Technical Credits

DJ Premier   Producer
L.V.   Producer
Scott Spencer Storch   Producer
Fat Joe   Executive Producer
Dré   Producer
Brian Springer   Vocal Engineer
Danny Zook   Sample Clearance
Alchemist   Producer
Steve Morales   Producer
Angelo Aponte   Engineer,Vocal Engineer
Swizz Beatz   Producer
Sean C.   Producer
Jayne Grodd   Administration
Cool   Producer
Adrian "Drop" Sanpalla   Vocal Engineer,Vocal Producer
Javier Valverde   Engineer,Vocal Engineer,Vocal Producer
J*S*T*A*R*S   Producer
Flex Cabrera   Management
Joe Crack   Executive Producer
Jesus Bobe   Programming
DJ Khaled Beat Novocaine   Producer
Khaled Khaled   Marketing,Promoter
Jeff "Gemcrates" Ladd   Engineer
Raul Pena   Engineer
Streetrunner   Producer
Marcella Araica   Vocal Engineer,Vocal Producer

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