The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer

The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer

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by Michel Bruneau
     
 

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Winner, Best Second Novel, 2013 Next Generation Indie Book Awards

Finalist, Literary Fiction, 2012 Book of the Year Award, Foreword Reviews

"My casket shall be filled to the rim with 2005 Saint-Émilion." So read the first line of the specific instructions for Keene's funeral-a funeral that nobody would attend, since he had no friends or family. This

Overview

Winner, Best Second Novel, 2013 Next Generation Indie Book Awards

Finalist, Literary Fiction, 2012 Book of the Year Award, Foreword Reviews

"My casket shall be filled to the rim with 2005 Saint-Émilion." So read the first line of the specific instructions for Keene's funeral-a funeral that nobody would attend, since he had no friends or family. This had to be a mistake. Carmina's ex-husband had never been one inclined towards such exuberance-"he was a boring engineer for Christ's sake." Besides, she didn't want to have anything to do with this sordid story-they hadn't spoken to each other for more than a decade. A story that would have her treasure hunt for junk, with a suicidal, pyromaniac kid in tow, while being courted by the shyest lawyer on earth. Keene didn't have friends, but he sure had quirky acquaintances; each of the eight Carmina has to visit holds a piece of the puzzle.

With its palette of quirky characters, imaginative developments, and unusual perspective on life and death, The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer is an inspirational journey that captivates, entertains, and provides food for thought to those of us who happen to know someone who might die someday (rare as it may be).

About the author:

Michel Bruneau is a boring engineer of the not so boring kind-whether he is emancipated or dead remains to be seen. His previous novel (Shaken Allegiances), which won the 2010 Grand Prize Next Generation Indie Book Awards and received much acclaim, depicted a Kafkaesque post-disaster world at the hands of self-serving actors. On a different tack, The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer is an uplifting story with an upbeat ending, because it was written with a pen of a different color.

www.michelbruneau.com

Reviews

"This is certainly one way to go out. A love triangle of the strangest kind. You might find yourself charmed by a so-called boring engineer."

— ForeWord Reviews

"The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer tells a compelling, and, at times, funny story. An entertaining read."

— San Francisco Book Review

"Plenty of humor with its own take on the romance, very much recommended reading."

— Midwest Book Review

Truly delightful. A sweet and poignant testimonial to love. Well worth reading.

— Readers Favorite

"Zany with occasional moments of seriousness."

— IndieReader Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780982475263
Publisher:
CePages Press
Publication date:
10/28/2012
Pages:
314
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.66(d)

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The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Alice DiNizo for Readers Favorite Forty year old Keene Mason, who describes himself as a "boring engineer", has died. He wishes to have his casket filled with 2005 Saint Emilion wine which costs over $50 a bottle and he wants to lie in his casket, now wine-filled, for a week before he is cremated. He appears to be family-less and friendless so in his final will and testament, overseen by lawyer Justin Lawson, he writes countdown letters to his estranged wife, Carmina Jewell, to gather certain objects and place them in his coffin. If not all his money must be burned in a bonfire. On page 43 of "The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer", Keene writes that "If my life were a novel, there would be no market for it." On the same page, he describes himself as an "unattractive and boring engineer, living a cowardly and untroubled life, forever unloved, slowly dying like a long candle running out of wax.".Carmina, separated from Keene by frustration, is a director of placement for a group home for children with special needs. She reads Keene's complex letters to Sig, a suicidal child in that home, and they follow his directives that lead them far from home. But can Carmina follow through on all eight of these difficult letters? Michel Bruneau has written a deep and often difficult-to-read but truly delightful story in "The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer". Keene's letters to Carmina are long and detailed, but the story's ending is a sweet and poignant testimonial to love. The characters of Carmina, Sig, Justin, and all of Keene's unknown friends and associates are essential to the story. The plot line runs smoothly, if sometimes very sadly, to the story's satisfying conclusion. "The Emancipating Death of a Boring Engineer" is a story well worth reading.