The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure [NOOK Book]

Overview

The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome is a radical re-visioning of what government is, a powerful analysis of why it doesn't work, and an exploration of the innovative solutions spontaneously emerging thanks to the fortunate failure of politics.

Every year, consumer goods and services get better, cheaper, and more widely available while critical necessities delivered by government grow more expensive, even as their quality declines. The reason for this paradox is simple: ...

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The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure

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Overview

The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome is a radical re-visioning of what government is, a powerful analysis of why it doesn't work, and an exploration of the innovative solutions spontaneously emerging thanks to the fortunate failure of politics.

Every year, consumer goods and services get better, cheaper, and more widely available while critical necessities delivered by government grow more expensive, even as their quality declines. The reason for this paradox is simple: politics. Not bad politics, not liberal politics, not conservative politics, not politics corrupted by big money or distorted by special-interest groups, but the simple practice of delivering goods and services through federal, state, and local governments and their obsolete decision-making practices.

National Review columnist Kevin Williamson describes the crisis of the modern welfare state in the era of globalization and argues that the crucial political failures of our time—education, health care, social security, and monetary policy—are due not to ideology but the nature of politics itself. Meanwhile, those who can't or won't turn to the state for goods and services—from homeschoolers to Wall Street to organized crime—are experimenting with replacing the outmoded social software of the state with market-derived alternatives.

Williamson compellingly analyzes the government's numerous failures and reports on the solutions that people all over the country are discovering. You will meet homeschoolers who have abandoned public schools; see inside private courtrooms that administer the law beyond government; encounter entrepreneurs developing everything from private currencies to shadow intelligence agencies rivaling the CIA; and learn about the remarkably peaceable enforcement of justice in the allegedly lawless Wild West.

As our outmoded twentieth-century government collapses under the weight of its own incompetence and inefficiency, Williamson points to the green shoots of the brave new world that is already being born.

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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
At last, a conservative treatise that isn't too bilious to taste--and that is often entertaining even as it is provocative. National Review columnist Williamson, like so many on the political hard right, wants to shrink government to a size, as Grover Norquist infamously said, that it can be drowned in the bathtub. This is not because government has no purpose, but since it has become an essentially criminal enterprise: "It is a monopoly on violence," he writes at one point about the propensity of "men with guns" to arrive on the scene once an official has decided that an enterprise--a protest against corruption, say, or girls selling lemonade to raise money for cancer research--is against its interests. Government, the author writes, is self-perpetuating and self-serving, and its minions, in whom we have entrusted power, "are plainly incompetent…and…cannot be trusted." He adds, using the old libertarian argument, that the mechanism by which power is enshrined in a supposedly democratic society is suspect, even oxymoronic, inasmuch as the social contract is the only one that does not require or even request endorsement from members of society. Williamson is eminently reasonable throughout, even when he's burning down city hall. His calls for privatization of some aspects of the law and of the entitlement system sound much less shrill than those of Rush Limbaugh and his ilk, and he even allows that the rich should properly pay more tax than the poor--though perhaps to the poor directly, in the form of an invested trust, rather than to the state, since "money given to politics gets used for politics, for all of Washington's hollow talk about ‘investment.' " It's a pleasure to find so even and logical a voice in these pages, which deserve broad airing.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062220707
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/7/2013
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 405,976
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Kevin D. Williamson covers the intersection of economics, politics, and culture for National Review and National Review Online. His highly regarded Exchequer column relies on his trademark "English-major math" to chronicle the daily growth of the national debt and the ugly symbiotic relationship between Washington and Wall Street. He is a regular on Kudlow & Company, Lou Dobbs Tonight, and National Public Radio, and has appeared on dozens of other television news and talk-radio shows. He has served as a professor at The King's College and as director of the journalism program at the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University. He lives in New York City.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2013

    Never has the end of the world as we know it seemed so utopian.

    Never has the end of the world as we know it seemed so utopian. The invisible--and seemingly,magic--hand of the marketplace is going to solve all of our problems. Privatizing prisons works so well--at killing the inmates because the profit mongers do not want to spend money on their care. Being in prison should not be a de facto death sentence. Charter schools do not, as a group, do a better job than the educational colossus he so deplores in delivering measurable gains. At least he doesn't have a shrill tone. Still, the changes that he lusts for would cause tremendous dislocation, real physical harm to many and would further lead to the socioeconomic stratification that putting the market winners and manipulators--i.e. the rich--in charge has caused, so far.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 1, 2014

    How is it going to be awesome?

    The book was well written and explains why America is on an unsustainable path, but the author does not make it clear why the end is going to be awesome, except to hint at ways that technology can be used to help individuals bypass the hazards and obstacles. I would have liked to see footnotes or endnotes to document where the information came from.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

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