The End of All Things

The End of All Things

4.8 4
by John Scalzi
     
 

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Hugo-award winning author, John Scalzi returns to his best-selling Old Man's War universe with The End of All Things, the direct sequel to 2013's The Human Division

Humans expanded into space...only to find a universe populated with multiple alien species bent on their destruction. Thus was the Colonial Union formed, to help protect us from a

Overview

Hugo-award winning author, John Scalzi returns to his best-selling Old Man's War universe with The End of All Things, the direct sequel to 2013's The Human Division

Humans expanded into space...only to find a universe populated with multiple alien species bent on their destruction. Thus was the Colonial Union formed, to help protect us from a hostile universe. The Colonial Union used the Earth and its excess population for colonists and soldiers. It was a good arrangement...for the Colonial Union. Then the Earth said: no more.

Now the Colonial Union is living on borrowed time-a couple of decades at most, before the ranks of the Colonial Defense Forces are depleted and the struggling human colonies are vulnerable to the alien species who have been waiting for the first sign of weakness, to drive humanity to ruin. And there's another problem: A group, lurking in the darkness of space, playing human and alien against each other-and against their own kind -for their own unknown reasons.

In this collapsing universe, CDF Lieutenant Harry Wilson and the Colonial Union diplomats he works with race against the clock to discover who is behind attacks on the Union and on alien races, to seek peace with a suspicious, angry Earth, and keep humanity's union intact...or else risk oblivion, and extinction-and the end of all things.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 07/06/2015
Hugo-winner Scalzi integrates the best aspects of war stories into the polished and powerful sixth volume—which consists of four connected novellas—in the Old Man’s War space opera series. The inevitable and parallel downward spirals of the two corrupt space empires, the human Colonial Union and the alien Conclave, are finally coming to a head. All four protagonists work for one of the two entities, and Scalzi shifts among their perspectives to thread a fine needle, recognizing that good people can be entrenched in terrible systems and sometimes can’t (or won’t) change them. Added tension comes in the form of a group called the Equilibrium, which is intent on destroying both the Colonial Union and the Conclave and killing billions in the process. Human Harry Wilson and alien Hafte Sorvalh will be familiar to returning readers, while CU pilot Rafe Daquin and CU Lt. Heather Lee are welcome new voices. New readers will certainly enjoy the work, but the real payoff comes for longtime fans, who will especially appreciate a powerful moment featuring the alien General Gau. Scalzi knows just how to satisfy his fans, providing tense, thrilling action scenes while turning a critical eye on the interstellar equivalents of the military-industrial complex. Agent: Ethan Ellenberg, Ethan Ellenberg Literary Agency. (Aug.)
Library Journal
06/15/2015
In four linked novellas (first published serially in June and July 2015) Scalzi concludes the story lines from The Human Division. Given that Earth is at odds with the Colonial Union and the increasing hostile Conclave, the end may be nigh for humanity. Things gets even worse with the discovery that all three parties are being manipulated by a shadowy secret organization known as Equilibrium, whose goal may be the destruction of the planet. The standout is the first novella, "Life of the Mind," in which pilot and former programmer Rafe Daquin is enslaved by Equilibrium as a brain in a box and placed in charge of a ship slated for a suicide mission. Ambassador Abumwe, Lieutenant Wilson, Hart Schmidt, and Hafte Sorvalh, known to Human Division readers, play smaller but equally important roles in the other stories. VERDICT A more serious tone and darker themes characterizes Scalzi's latest, which is closest in style to his YA title, Zoe's Tale, and may not satisfy all readers. [See Prepub Alert, 2/9/15.]—JM
School Library Journal
01/01/2016
The latest book by Scalzi is set in the universe of The Old Man's War (Tor, 2005) but works well as a stand-alone. Four interrelated novellas, each with a different narrator, tell the story of a conflict among Earth, the Colonial Union (the descendants of Earth, who left to find other habitable planets), and the Conclave (the union of the other intelligent species who joined together in defense against the Colonial Union). It soon transpires that there is yet another group at work in the universe—the Equilibrium—and it isn't immediately obvious what their motives or goals are. This is straight-up military/political science fiction. Scalzi, as always, is adept at presenting his stories not as black-and-white conflicts but rather as complex tales shrouded in shades of gray. Three of the narrators are CDF (Colonial Defense Forces) soldiers, and one is a Conclave diplomat, and each has a slightly different take on the events at the center of the tale. VERDICT This is not a book for sci-fi newbies, but teen fans who enjoy action-packed science fiction with plenty to think about will want to sink their teeth into this one.—Sarah Flowers, formerly of Santa Clara County Library
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2015-05-20
In the sixth Old Man's War novel, a direct sequel to The Human Division (2013), human and alien governments on the brink of war must foil the secret cabal that pushed them there. The two major human governments—of the Earth and the Colonial Union—have firmly parted ways after the destruction of Earth Station, and both have a rocky relationship with the Conclave, a coalition of alien governments. A CU diplomatic unit has suspected for some time that a fourth party has encouraged this tense situation and is responsible for several recent provocative incidents which have been pinned either on the CU or the Conclave. But they have no definitive evidence until the brain of a human cargo pilot, Rafe Daquin, and the ship he controls, The Chandler, escape from that group, the Equilibrium, carrying both information on the conspiracy and a significant figure in it. Now the CU diplomats must convince Earth and the Conclave of the truth and that they all must work together (at least for now) before the Equilibrium leads the three governments to destroy one another while it reaps the profits. The Old Man's War books occupy the space-opera void that American TV used to fill with various incarnations of Star Trek, Babylon 5, Farscape, etc.; it's no wonder Syfy is developing the series for TV. This novel—actually four connected novellas—provides a conclusion to the latest plotline while remaining open to new stories in the universe. It's classic crowd-pleasing Scalzi, offering thrilling adventure scenes (space battles, daring military actions, parachute jumps through a planet's atmosphere), high-stakes politics, snarky commentary, and food for thought. Delightful, compulsively readable, and even somewhat nutritious brain candy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780765376107
Publisher:
Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date:
05/31/2016
Series:
Old Man's War Series , #6
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
44,073
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.80(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

The End of All Things


By John Scalzi, Patrick Nielsen Hayden

Tom Doherty Associates

Copyright © 2015 John Scalzi
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4668-4942-6



CHAPTER 1

PART ONE

So, I'm supposed to tell you how I became a brain in a box.

Huh. Well, that starts off a little dark, doesn't it.

Also, I don't really know, technically, how they did it to me. It's not like once I woke up as a disembodied brain they showed me an informational video about how they did it, just in case I was curious. Here's the part where we snipped off all the blood vessels and peripheral nerves, the video would say. Here's how we removed the skull and spinal column, and here's how we stuffed your brain full of nifty little sensors to track your thoughts. Pay attention, there's a test later.

Jesus, I'm really bad at this.

I'm not a writer or an orator. I'm not a storyteller. I'm a spaceship pilot, so let me just get that right out there. The Colonial Union asked me to tell what happened to me because they think that information will be useful to them. Fine, I'll do it, happy to help. But it's not going to be, you know, classic literature. It's going to skip around. I'm going to get lost telling the story and come back to points and then get lost again. I'm doing this off the top of my head.

Well, metaphorically. I don't have a head anymore. Pretty sure they tossed my head into an incinerator or something.

See what I mean?

Someone's going to have to edit this if it's going to make any sense at all. So to you poor anonymous Colonial Union editor: I salute you and I apologize to you. I'm not trying to make your life difficult, I swear. I just don't know what they really want, or how they want me to do it.

Just tell us everything, I was told. Get it all down. Don't worry. We'll sort it out. Which I guess is where you come in, anonymous editor. Happy sorting.

And if you're reading this: I'm sure the editor did an excellent job.

Where to start this damn thing? I don't think any of you will give a crap about my childhood; it was standard-issue pretty happy, mostly noneventful, with decent parents and friends. Schooling likewise unremarkable with all the usual bits of stupidity and libidinousness with occasional moments of cramming for tests. Honestly, no one will want to hear about any of that. I hardly do and I lived it.

So, I think I'll start at the job interview.

Yes, that's a good place to start. The interview that gave me the job that turned me into a headless wonder.

In retrospect, I kind of wish I hadn't of gotten the gig.

Oh, and maybe I should say what my name is. Just for the record.

It's Rafe. Rafe Daquin.

I'm Rafe Daquin, and I'm a brain in a box.

Hi.

* * *

The reason I got the interview at all was because of a university friend of mine, Hart Schmidt. He works as a Colonial Union diplomat, which I always thought was the very definition of a thankless job, and in some recent downtime was in a bar on Phoenix Station and talking to the executive officer of the Chandler, a cargo hauler doing a standard triangle run between Phoenix, Huckleberry, and Erie. Not exactly a prestige job, but a gig is a gig. They can't all be glamour postings.

Anyway, in conversation the XO was griping about how when they got to Phoenix Station the Chandler was met by a bunch of law enforcement types. Seems one of the Chandler's pilots had a little side thing going, down on the actual planet of Phoenix, the details of which I'm still a little hazy on but which involved blackmail, intimidation, graft, and bigamy, the last of these being one not so much like the others. The point was the Chandler was now down a pilot and needed one, fast.

Which was nice, because I was a pilot, and I needed a job. Also fast.

"This tells me you were a programmer before you were a pilot," the XO said, as he looked at my work history. We were in a burger joint on Phoenix Station; I had hauled my ass up from the planet as soon as Hart told me about the gig. The burgers were legend, but I wasn't really there for the culinary thrills. The XO's name was Lee Han and he had the look of someone who was going through the motions. I had a feeling that as long as I didn't admit to murdering adorable kittens in front of children, I was going to get the gig.

"I went to school for computer engineering," I said. "Graduated and did that and programming for a couple of years. Worked for Eyre Systems, mostly on starship navigation and maintenance software. You might have one of our setups on the Chandler."

"We do," Han said.

"I can throw in some technical support," I said. It was a joke.

I'm not entirely sure Han got that. "It's not the usual move from programming to piloting," he said.

"It's the programming that got me interested in piloting," I said. "I was one of the programmers who had some semblance of social skills, so eventually I was assigned to go up to Phoenix Station and work on ships to customize the software. So I spent a lot of time in ships and talking to crew and listening to them talk about where they've been in the universe. You do that long enough and just sitting at a desk pushing code seems like a way to spend a lot of time wasting your life. I wanted to see what was out there. So I hustled my way into an apprentice piloting gig. That was seven years ago."

"Not exactly an upward move, paywise," Han said.

I shrugged. I figured that the shrug would come across as a casual and cool Hey, some things are more important than money rather than Hey, I'm living with my parents who are beginning to resent that fact so I will take what I can get. Anyway both were true. Lots of things can be more important than money when you lacked other options.

Not to paint my parents as the bad people here. It's just that they had made it clear that it was one thing to support me while I was working my way up a ladder, and another thing to support a thirty-two-year-old human while I was sitting on my ass at home between gigs. Maybe they wouldn't let me starve, but they weren't going to make me comfortable.

Which was fine. I wasn't out of work because I was lazy.

"Says here you've been out of work for the last nine months," Han said.

"I've been between ships, yes," I said.

"Want to explain that?" Han asked.

Well, there was no way around that one. "I'm being blackballed," I said.

"By whom?"

"By Captain Werner Ostrander of the Lastan Falls."

I thought I saw a faint smile on Han's lips when I said this. "Go on," he said.

"There's not much to say," I said. "I was second pilot on the Baikal and the first pilot wasn't going anywhere anytime soon, so when I heard there was an opportunity to move up to first pilot on the Lastan, I took it. What I didn't know was that there was a reason why the Lastan had gone through six pilots in two years, and by the time I found out it was too late. I ended up breaking my contract."

"That must have been expensive."

"It was worth every penny," I said. "Also, as I was leaving the ship I dropped my mother's name to the chief steward. My mother's a labor lawyer. The class action suit against Ostrander that followed was, shall we say, very satisfying."

Han definitely smiled at that.

"But it also meant that Ostrander now goes out of his way to warn off anyone I try to get a pilot's job with," I said. "No one likes a troublemaker."

"No, no one does," Han agreed, and inside I groaned, because I figured this was where I just blew the gig. "But then, I crewed on the Lastan Falls for a year, early in my career."

I blinked. "You did?" I said.

"Yes," Han said. "Let's just say I can understand wanting to break your contract. And also that at some point I want to hear the details of that suit."

I grinned. "You got it, sir," I said.

"I'm going to be blunt, Mr. Daquin, this position is a step back for you," Han said. "It's third pilot, and it's a straight bread-and-butter trade run. We go here, we go to Huckleberry, we go to Erie, we repeat. It's not exciting, and just like the Baikal, there's little chance for advancement."

"Let me be equally blunt, sir," I said. "I've spent nine months at the bottom of a gravity well. You know as well as I do that if I spend too much more time there, I'm going to get stuck. You need another pilot right now so you don't lose time and money on your trade run. I get that. I need to get off the rock so I can have another shot at first pilot somewhere else without Ostrander's blackball over my head. I figure we're both in a spot and can help each other out."

"I just wanted to be sure everyone's expectations were in order," Han said.

"I have no illusions, sir."

"Good. Then I can give you a day to close out your business here."

I reached down and patted the crew bag at my feet. "Business closed. The only thing I have to do is find my friend Hart and buy him a drink for setting up this interview."

"If you can do that quickly there'll be a shuttle to the Chandler at gate thirty-six in a couple of hours."

"I'll be on it, sir," I said.

"Well, then," Han said, stood up, and extended his hand. "Welcome to the Chandler, pilot."

I took the hand. "Thank you, sir. Glad to be aboard."

* * *

I found Hart a half hour later, on the other side of Phoenix Station, in a reception for his boss, Ambassador Abumwe.

"She got the Meritorious Service Award," Hart said. He was on his second glass of spiked punch and he was never one who held his alcohol very well, so he was on his way to being a little tipsy. He was also dressed in a formal diplomatic uniform. I thought it made him look like a doorman. But then I had just spent the better part of the year in sweatpants, so who the hell was I to say.

"What did she do that was meritorious?" I asked.

"She kept her entire staff alive while Earth Station was being attacked, for starters," Hart said. "You heard about Earth Station?"

I nodded. The Colonial Union was pretty good at keeping bad news from reaching the civilians of the colonies, but some pieces of news are harder to hide than others. For example, the news that the Earth's sole space station was destroyed by unknown terrorists, killing thousands including the cream of the Earth's diplomatic corps, and that the Earth blamed the Colonial Union for the attack and severed all diplomatic and economic ties.

Yeah, that one was a little hard to hide.

The Colonial Union's official story about it, said only that it had been a terrorist attack; the rest of it I had filled in from former shipmates and friends like Hart. When you live at the bottom of a gravity well, you only tend to hear the official story. The people who actually move between the stars, on the other hand, hear a lot more. It's hard to sell the official story to people who can see things for themselves.

"Some people saved themselves," said Harry Wilson, a friend of Hart's who he'd just introduced to me. Wilson was a member of the Colonial Defense Forces; his green skin gave him away. That and the fact that he looked the same age as my kid brother, but was probably something like 120 years old. Having a genetically modified, not-quite-human body had certain advantages, as long as you didn't mind being the same color as guacamole. "Your friend Hart here, for example. He got himself to an escape pod and ditched from Earth Station as it was literally blowing up around him."

"A slight exaggeration," Hart said.

"No, it actually was literally blowing up around you," Wilson said.

Hart waved him off and looked back over to me. "Harry's making it sound more dramatic than it was."

"It sounds pretty dramatic," I admitted.

"Space station blowing up around him," Wilson said again, emphasizing the last part.

"I was unconscious for most of the trip down to Earth," Hart said. "I think that's probably a good thing."

I nodded toward Ambassador Abumwe, who I recognized from pictures, and who was on the other side of the reception hall, shaking hands with well-wishers in a receiving line. "How was the ceremony?"

"Painful," Wilson said.

"It was all right," Hart said.

"Painful," Wilson repeated. "The guy who gave out the medal —"

"Assistant Secretary of State Tyson Ocampo," Hart said.

"— was a fatuous gasbag," Wilson continued. "I've met a lot of people in the diplomatic corps who were in love with the sound of their own voice, but this guy. He and his voice should just get a room."

"It wasn't that bad," Hart said to me.

"You saw Abumwe's face while that dude was going on," Wilson said, to Hart.

"Ocampo," Hart said, clearly pained that the assistant secretary of state was being referred to as "that dude." "The number two man in the department. And there was nothing going on with her face," Hart said.

"She was definitely wearing her 'please shut the hell up,' face," Wilson said, to me. "Trust me, I have seen it many times."

I looked over to Hart. "It's true," he said. "Harry has seen the ambassador's 'shut up' face more than most."

"Speak of the devil," Wilson said, and motioned slightly with his head. "Look who's coming this way." I glanced over and saw a middle-aged man in a resplendent Colonial Union diplomatic uniform, followed by a young woman, heading our direction.

"The fatuous gasbag?" I asked.

"Secretary Ocampo," Hart said, emphatically.

"Same thing," Wilson said.

"Gentlemen," Ocampo said, coming up to us.

"Hello, Secretary Ocampo," Wilson said, very smoothly, and I thought I saw Hart relax maybe a tiny bit. "What may we do for you, sir?"

"Well, since you're standing between me and the punch, perhaps you would be so kind as to get me a cup," he said.

"Let me get that for you," Hart said, and nearly dropped his own glass in the process.

"Thank you," Ocampo said. "Schmidt, yes? One of Abumwe's people." He then turned to Wilson. "And you are?"

"Lieutenant Harry Wilson."

"Really," Ocampo said, and sounded impressed. "You're the one who saved the daughter of the secretary of state of the United States when Earth Station was destroyed."

"Danielle Lowen," Wilson said. "And yes. She's a diplomat in her own right, of course."

"Of course," Ocampo said. "But the fact that she's Secretary Lowen's daughter didn't hurt. It's one reason why the U.S. is one of the few countries on Earth that will speak to the Colonial Union in any capacity."

"I'm happy to be useful, sir," Wilson said. Hart handed him his punch.

"Thank you," Ocampo said, to Hart, and then turned his attention back to Wilson. "I understand you also skydived from Earth Station all the way down to Earth with Miss Lowen."

"That's correct, sir," Wilson said.

"That must have been some experience."

"I mostly remember trying not to go 'splat' at the end of it."

"Of course," Ocampo said. He turned to me next, registering my lack of dress uniform and the crew bag at my feet, and waited for me to identify myself.

"Rafe Daquin," I said, taking the hint. "I'm crashing the party, sir."

"He's a friend of mine who happened to be on station," Hart said. "He's a pilot on a trade ship."

"Oh," Ocampo said. "Which one?"

"The Chandler," I said.

"Isn't that interesting," Ocampo said. "I've booked passage on the Chandler."

"You have?" I asked.

"Yes. It's been a few years since I've taken a vacation and I decided to take a month to hike the Connecticut mountains on Huckleberry. That's the Chandler's next destination, unless I'm mistaken," Ocampo said.

"You could just take a department ship, I would think," I said.

Ocampo smiled. "It would look bad to commandeer a State Department ship as a personal taxi, I'm afraid. As I understand it the Chandler lets out a couple of staterooms for passengers. I and Vera here," he nodded toward his assistant, "have taken them. How are they?"

"The staterooms?" I asked. Ocampo nodded. "I'm not sure."

"Rafe has just been hired as of about an hour ago," Hart said. "He hasn't even been on the ship yet. He's taking a shuttle over in about an hour."

"That's the same shuttle you'll be on, sir," Vera said to Ocampo.

"So we'll experience it for the first time together," the secretary said, to me.

"I suppose that's true," I said. "If you would like I would be happy to escort you and your assistant to the shuttle gate, when you're ready to depart."

"Thank you, I'd appreciate that," Ocampo said. "I'll have Vera tell you when we're ready. Until then, gentlemen." He nodded and wandered off with his punch, Vera following behind.

"Very diplomatic," Wilson said to me, once he was gone.

"You jumped out of an exploding space station?" I said to him, changing the subject.

"It wasn't exploding that much when I jumped," Wilson said.

"And you got out in an escape pod just in time," I said to Hart. "I'm clearly in the wrong line of space travel for excitement."

"Trust me," Wilson said. "You don't want that much excitement."


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The End of All Things by John Scalzi, Patrick Nielsen Hayden. Copyright © 2015 John Scalzi. Excerpted by permission of Tom Doherty Associates.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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Meet the Author

John Scalzi is one of the most popular and acclaimed SF authors to emerge in the last decade. His massively successful debut Old Man’s War won him science fiction’s John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. His New York Times bestsellers include The Last Colony, Fuzzy Nation, and Redshirts; which won 2013’s Hugo Award for Best Novel. Material from his widely read blog The Whatever (whatever.scalzi.com) has also earned him two other Hugo Awards. He lives in Ohio with his wife and daughter.

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The End of All Things 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This man is an excellent writer. This book has one of the best endings I have ever read. I read a lot. I am about half way through most of what he has written and not a dud in the lot. I would ask one thing of the author. Please continue this series! Its good old fashion fun and a delight to read. Whooa!!!!!
hectorcartel 8 months ago
Drewano More than 1 year ago
A wonderful conclusion (?) to the Old Man’s War series. The story is told from a few different points of view giving a more complete view of the plot. The book has Scalzi’s classic mix of sci-fi, action and humor with great and interesting characters. The story moves along well and is engaging but does loose its way a bit in the middle, however it recovers rather quickly. Overall a great and fun read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have been waiting for those book for years and now that I have it, it was worth the wait.