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The End of American Lynching
     

The End of American Lynching

by Ashraf H. A. Rushdy
 

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The End of American Lynching questions how we think about the dynamics of lynching, what lynchings mean to the society in which they occur, how lynching is defined, and the circumstances that lead to lynching. Ashraf H. A. Rushdy looks at three lynchings over the course of the twentieth century—one in Coatesville, Pennsylvania, in 1911, one in Marion,

Overview

The End of American Lynching questions how we think about the dynamics of lynching, what lynchings mean to the society in which they occur, how lynching is defined, and the circumstances that lead to lynching. Ashraf H. A. Rushdy looks at three lynchings over the course of the twentieth century—one in Coatesville, Pennsylvania, in 1911, one in Marion, Indiana, in 1930, and one in Jasper, Texas, in 1998—to see how Americans developed two distinct ways of thinking and talking about this act before and after the 1930s.

One way takes seriously the legal and moral concept of complicity as a way to understand the dynamics of a lynching; this way of thinking can give us new perceptions into the meaning of mobs and the lynching photographs in which we find them. Another way, which developed in the 1940s and continues to influence us today, uses a strategy of denial to claim that lynchings have ended. Rushdy examines how the denial of lynching emerged and developed, providing insight into how and why we talk about lynching the way we do at the dawn of the twenty-first century.  In doing so, he forces us to confront our responsibilities as American citizens and as human beings.

Editorial Reviews

author of Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare - Leigh Raiford
"Both excellent and unique, The End of American Lynching offers a sophisticated yet clear and methodical approach to the study of lynching...fresh, distinct, and eminently readable."
author of Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 - W. Fitzhugh Brundage
"Written with vigor and in sprightly prose, in this provocative book Rushdy adds much-needed subtlety to the contemporary ‘end of racism’ debate while clarifying why so many Americans misunderstood or denied the reality of lynching for so long."
Journal of American History
"The End of American Lynching, Ashraf H. A. Rushdy’s important examination of lynching discourse, asks scholars to reconsider how they remember and talk about racial violence."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813552927
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Publication date:
07/18/2012
Pages:
232
Sales rank:
1,032,162
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
17 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Ashraf Rushdy is the University Academic Secretary at Wesleyan University. He has most recently published Remembering Generations: Race and Family in Contemporary African American Fiction (University of North Carolina Press, 2001) and Neo-Slave Narratives: Studies in the Social Logic of a Literary Form (Oxford University Press, 1999).

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