The End of Days (Book VII): Armageddon and Prophecies of the Return

Overview

Deluxe hardcover edition of the 7th and final book in Zecharia Sitchin’s Earth Chronicles series

• Explains how mankind and its planet Earth are subject to a predetermined cyclical Celestial Time

• Details how if you learn Earth’s ancient history it becomes possible to foretell the Future

• Based on Sitchin’s more than 30 years of research into the Sumerian civilization’s record of the Anunnaki

Why is it that our current twenty-first century A.D. is so similar to the ...

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Overview

Deluxe hardcover edition of the 7th and final book in Zecharia Sitchin’s Earth Chronicles series

• Explains how mankind and its planet Earth are subject to a predetermined cyclical Celestial Time

• Details how if you learn Earth’s ancient history it becomes possible to foretell the Future

• Based on Sitchin’s more than 30 years of research into the Sumerian civilization’s record of the Anunnaki

Why is it that our current twenty-first century A.D. is so similar to the twenty-first century B.C.? Is history destined to repeat itself? Will biblical prophecies come true, and if so, when?

It has been more than three decades since Zecharia Sitchin's trailblazing book The 12th Planet brought to life the Sumerian civilization and its record of the Anunnaki--the extraterrestrials who fashioned man and gave mankind civilization and religion. In this final volume of the Earth Chronicles Series, Sitchin shows that the End is anchored in the events of the Beginning, and once you learn of this Beginning, it is possible to foretell the Future.

In The End of Days, a masterwork that required thirty years of additional research, Sitchin presents compelling new evidence that the Past is the Future--that mankind and its planet Earth are subject to a predetermined cyclical Celestial Time.

In an age when religious fanaticism and a clash of civilizations raise the specter of a nuclear Armageddon, Zecharia Sitchin shatters perceptions and uses history to reveal what is to come at The End of Days.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Times
“In Mr. Sitchin’s [work], evolution and creationism collide. He has spent his life arguing that people evolved with a little genetic intervention from ancient astronauts who came to Earth . . . He has studied ancient Hebrew, Akkadian and Sumerian, the language of the ancient Mesopotamians, who brought you geometry, astronomy, the chariot, and the lunar calendar. And in the etchings of Sumerian pre-cuneiform script--the oldest example of writing--are stories of creation and the cosmos that Mr. Sitchin takes literally.”
Kirkus Reviews
After three decades devoted to theorizing about extraterrestrial origins, the author, in this concluding title in his seven-volume Earth Chronicles series, addresses the question: When will they return?The author claims that travelers called the Anunnaki arrived on Earth long ago from a planet named Nibiru. They genetically engineered the human race; all religion and much of our culture can trace its origins back to these extraterrestrial "gods." Sitchin theorizes that the last Anunnaki left Earth in the sixth century b.c., but he believes some of them might still be residing on Mars. Utilizing "end of days" terminology, the author stirs together numerology, prophecy and astrology in order to determine when the Anunnaki may return. He fails to explain, however, exactly what such a return might entail. The string of occurrences Sitchin deduces from ancient literature, mythology and art belie all conventional knowledge. His tapestry of theories requires that physics, archaeology, evolution, astronomy and theology must all be thrown out the window to one degree or another. His credibility is not enhanced by his use of bold type and exclamation points on virtually every page. Despite a lot of buildup, the conclusion merely presents a few possible dates and an assurance that the Anunnaki do intend to return. Sitchin's fans will find this an interesting, though inconclusive read. As for the inevitably skeptical majority, they will take a certain amount of entertainment from wondering what each new chapter will bring: Sodom and Gomorrah destroyed by a nuclear bomb? Solomon's Temple built on top of a spaceport? Muslim minarets simulating rockets ready for launch? Wow. Evolutionists, creationistsand even members of the Flat Earth Society will all find reason to criticize this cuckoo book. That's one accomplishment, at least.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591432005
  • Publisher: Inner Traditions/Bear & Company
  • Publication date: 10/4/2014
  • Edition description: 3rd Edition, Deluxe Hardcover Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 772,632
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

One of the few scholars able to read and interpret ancient Sumerian and Akkadian clay tablets, Zecharia Sitchin (1920-2010) based his bestselling The 12th Planet on texts from the ancient civilizations of the Near East. Drawing both widespread interest and criticism, his controversial theories on the Anunnaki origins of humanity have been translated into more than 20 languages and featured on radio and television programs around the world.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 8
In the Name of God

A clear example of the religious aspect of the wars of 1760 b.c.--and deliberate choice of targets--is found in the Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings 18-19, in which the siege of Jerusalem by the army of the Assyrian king Sennacherib is described. Having surrounded and cut off the city, the Assyrian commander engaged in psychological warfare in order to get the city’s defenders to surrender. Speaking in Hebrew so all on the city’s walls could understand, he shouted the words of the king of Assyria: “Has any of the gods of the nations ever rescued their lands from the hand of the king of Ashur? Where are the gods of Hamath and Arpad? Where are the gods of Sepharvaim, Hena and Avva? Where are the gods of the land of Samaria? Which of the gods of all these lands ever rescued his land from my hand? Will then Yahweh rescue Jerusalem from my hand?” (Yahweh, the historical records show, did.)

What were those religious wars about? The wars, and national gods in whose name they were fought, don’t make sense except when one realizes that at the core of the conflicts was what the Sumerians called DUR.AN.KI--the “Bond Heaven-Earth.” Repeatedly, the ancient texts spoke of the catastrophe “when Earth was separated from Heaven”--when the spaceport connecting them was destroyed. The overwhelming question in the aftermath of the nuclear calamity was this: Who--which god and his nation--could claim to be the one on Earth who now possessed the link to the Heavens?

For the gods, the destruction of the spaceport in the Sinai Peninsula was a material loss of a facility that required replacement. But can one imagine the the spiritual and religious impact--on Mankind? All of a sudden, the worshipped gods of Heaven and Earth were cut off from Heaven . . .

With the spaceport in the Sinai now obliterated, only three space-related sites remained in the Old World: the Landing Place in the Cedar Mountains; the post-Diluvial Mission Control Center that replaced Nippur; and the Great Pyramids in Egypt that anchored the Landing Corridor. With the destruction of the spaceport, did those other sites still have a useful celestial function--and thus a religious significance?

We know the answer, to some extent, because all three sites still stand on Earth, challenging mankind by their mysteries and the gods by facing upward to the heavens.

The most familiar is the Great Pyramid and its companions in Giza; its size, geometric precision, inner complexity, and celestial alignments have long cast doubt on the attribution of its construction to a Pharaoh named Cheops--an attribution supported solely by a discovery of a hieroglyph of his name inside the pyramid. In other books I have offered textual and pictorial evidence explaining how and why the Anunnaki designed and built those pyramids. Having been stripped of its radiating guidance equipment during the wars of the gods, the Great Pyramid and its companions continued to serve as physical beacons for the Landing Corridor. With the spaceport gone, they remained silent witnesses to a vanished Past; there has been no indication they ever became sacred religious objects.

The Landing Place in the Cedar Forest has a different record. Gilgamesh, who went to it almost a millennium before the nuclear calamity, witnessed there the launching of a rocket ship; and the Phoenicians of the nearby city of Byblos on the Mediterranean coast depicted on a coin a rocket ship emplaced on a special base within an enclosure at the very same place--almost a thousand years after the nuclear event. So, with and then without the spaceport, the Landing Place continued to be operative.

The place, Ba’albek (“The valley-cleft of Ba’al”), in Lebanon, consisted in antiquity of a vast (about five million square feet) platform of paved stones at the northwestern corner of which an enormous stone structure rose heavenward. Built with perfectly shaped massive stone blocks weighing 600 to 900 tons each, its western wall was especially fortified with the heaviest stone blocks on Earth, including three weighing an incredible 1,100 tons each known as the Trilithon. Amazingly those colossal stone blocks were quarried about two miles away in the valley, where one such block, whose quarrying was not completed, still sticks out from the ground.

The End of Days

The Greeks venerated the place since Alexander’s time as Heliopolis (City of the Sun god); the Romans built there the greatest temple to Zeus. The Byzantines converted it to a great church; the Muslims after them built there a mosque; and present-day Maronite Christians revere the place as a relic from the Time of the Giants.

Most sacred and hallowed to this day has been the site that served as Mission Control Center--Ur-Shalem (“City of the Comprehensive God”), Jerusalem. There, as in Baalbek but on a reduced scale, a large stone platform rests on a rock and cut-stones foundation, including a massive western wall with three colossal stone blocks that weigh about six hundred tons each. Upon that preexisting platform the Temple to Yahweh was built by King Solomon, its Holy of Holies with the Ark of the Covenant resting upon a sacred rock above a subterranean chamber. The Romans, who built the greatest temple ever to Jupiter in Baalbek, also planned to build one to Jupiter in Jerusalem instead of the one to Yahweh. The Temple Mount is nowadays dominated by the Muslim-built Dome of the Rock; its gilded dome originally surmonted the Muslim shrine at Baalbek--evidence that the link between the two space-related sites has seldom been missed.

In the trying times after the nuclear calamity, could Marduk’s Bab-Ili, his “Gateway of the gods,” substitute for the olden Bond Heaven-Earth sites? Could Marduk’s new Star Religion offer an answer to the perplexed masses?

The ancient search for an answer has continued to our very own time.

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Table of Contents

Preface The Past, The Future

1 The Messianic Clock

2
“And It Came to Pass”

3
Egyptian Prophecies, Human Destinies

4
Of Gods and Demigods

5
Countdown to Doomsday

6
Gone with the Wind

7
Destiny Had Fifty Names

8
In the Name of God

9
The Promised Land

10
The Cross on the Horizon

11
The Day of the Lord

12
Darkness at Noon

13
When the Gods Left Earth

14
The End of Days

15
Jerusalem: A Chalice, Vanished

16
Armageddon and Prophecies of the Return

Postscript

Index

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