The End of Racism: Principles for a Multiracial Society

The End of Racism: Principles for a Multiracial Society

4.5 2
by Dinesh D'Souza
     
 

The End of Racism goes beyond familiar polemics to raise fundamental questions that no one else has asked: Is racial prejudice innate, or is it culturally acquired? Is it peculiar to the West, or is it found in all societies? What is the legacy of slavery, and what does America owe blacks as compensation for it? Did the civil rights movement succeed or fail in its…  See more details below

Overview

The End of Racism goes beyond familiar polemics to raise fundamental questions that no one else has asked: Is racial prejudice innate, or is it culturally acquired? Is it peculiar to the West, or is it found in all societies? What is the legacy of slavery, and what does America owe blacks as compensation for it? Did the civil rights movement succeed or fail in its attempt to overcome the legacy of segregation and racism? Is there such a thing as rational discrimination? Can persons of color be racist? Is racism really the most serious problem facing black Americans today, or is it a declining phenomenon? If racism had a beginning, shouldn't it be possible to envision its end? In a scrupulous and balanced study, D'Souza shows that racism is a distinctively Western phenomenon, arising at about the time of the first European encounters with non-Western peoples, and he chronicles the political, cultural, and intellectual history of racism as well as the twentieth-century liberal crusade against it. D'Souza proactively traces the limitations of the civil rights movement to its flawed assumptions about the nature of racism. He argues that the American obsession with race is fueled by a civil rights establishment that has a vested interest in perpetuating black dependency, and he concludes that the generation that marched with Martin Luther King, Jr. may be too committed to the paradigm of racial struggle to see the possibility of progress. Perhaps, D'Souza suggests, like the Hebrews who were forced to wander in the desert for 40 years, that generation may have to pass away before their descendants can enter the promised land of freedom and equality. In the meantime, however, many race activists are preaching despair and poisoning the minds of a younger generation which in fact displays far less racial consciousness and bigotry than any other in American history. The End of Racism summons profound historical, moral, and practical arguments against the civil rights ort

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Claiming that racism in no longer an important factor in American life, D'Souza argues that government must cease to legislate issues on a racial basis. (Sept.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780029081020
Publisher:
Free Press
Publication date:
09/14/1995
Pages:
724
Product dimensions:
6.54(w) x 9.56(h) x 1.56(d)

Meet the Author

Dinesh D’Souza has had a twenty-five-year career as a writer, scholar, and public intellectual. A former policy analyst in the Reagan White House, D’Souza also served as John M. Olin Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He has been named one of America’s most influential conservative thinkers by the New York Times Magazine, and Newsweek cited him as one of the country’s most prominent Asian-Americans.

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The End of Racism 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was an amazingly challenging read, but well worth it. For those who don't understand or can't handle controversial ideas, this, however, is not for you. This book looks at things that are ignored in every other corner of society, but that perhaps need to be brought to light and aired out. An honest discussion of racism, its history, its effects, its possible solutions, is needed, and this is exactly what D'Souza provides here, backed up with extensive historical analysis and sound intellectual reasoning. For anyone who cares about the matter of racism, whether liberal or conservative, this is a book that should be included on their reading list.