The Enormous Egg

( 10 )

Overview

Young Nate Twitchell is surprised when one of the hens on his family farm lays a giant egg. After a painstaking wait, Nate is even more surprised when it hatches and out pops a baby triceratops that he names Uncle Beazley! But when Nate decides to keep the dino and raise it on his own, he has no idea what he's getting himself into. As Uncle Beazley grows, Nate and his family realize they are not equipped to take care of a full-sized dinosaur, and so with the help of their scientist friend, Nate and Uncle Beazley ...

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Overview

Young Nate Twitchell is surprised when one of the hens on his family farm lays a giant egg. After a painstaking wait, Nate is even more surprised when it hatches and out pops a baby triceratops that he names Uncle Beazley! But when Nate decides to keep the dino and raise it on his own, he has no idea what he's getting himself into. As Uncle Beazley grows, Nate and his family realize they are not equipped to take care of a full-sized dinosaur, and so with the help of their scientist friend, Nate and Uncle Beazley set off for the National Museum in Washington, D.C., on the hunt for the perfect home for a modern-day dinosaur—-then the real trouble begins!

The Enormous Egg was originally published in 1956 and has been a classic in children's literature ever since. This brand new edition features amazing new illustrations from Eisner-award winning graphic novelist Mark Crilley (creator of Akiko and Miki Falls).

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Editorial Reviews

Christian Science Monitor
"[An] engagingly hilarious comedy."
From the Publisher
"Quite a yarn. Recommended."—School Library Journal (double-starred review)

"[An] engagingly hilarious comedy."—Christian Science Monitor

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316119207
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 4/28/1993
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 188
  • Sales rank: 50,193
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 900L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.30 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Oliver Butterworth was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1918. Before his death in 1990, he taught English at the Hartford College of Women for 43 years.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

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(8)

4 Star

(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2001

    You won¿t be dis-egg-pointed!

    I just read a really good book. It¿s called The Enormous Egg, by Oliver Butterworth and Louis Darling. Nate Twitchell is the main character, a boy who lives on a farm with his family. One day, his chicken laid an enormous egg. He was determined to see what would come out. Because the egg was so big, he had to turn it under the chicken so all of the sides would stay warm. When the egg hatched, he couldn¿t believe his eyes. It wasn¿t a chicken, it wasn¿t a snake. It wasn¿t a bird or modern-day reptile of any kind. Crawling through the straw was the oldest reptile in the world. It was a dinosaur. What follows is a great adventure and everything turns into a big mess. That¿s all I¿m going to tell you. So read The Enormous Egg. You won¿t be dis-egg-pointed!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 29, 2013

    Twelve-year-old Nathan (Nate) Twitchell lives on a small farm ne

    Twelve-year-old Nathan (Nate) Twitchell lives on a small farm near Freedom, NH, with his father Walter who runs the local newspaper, the Freedom Sentinel, mother, and ten-year-old sister Cynthia. In the middle of June, one of their hens starts looking pretty queer and gets so big that she could hardly waddle. Later she lays the biggest egg that Nate had ever seen. It has a leathery shell and is as big as a mushmelon, measuring fifteen inches around and weighing three pounds and a quarter. What do you think finally hatches out of that egg one Sunday morning?

    Well, it isn’t a chicken. It is a dinosaur called Triceratops. As luck would have it, Dr. Oscar Ziemer, a paleontologist with the National Museum in Washington, DC, just happens to be vacationing in the area, staying with the MacPhersons down at the nearby lake, and has heard about the egg, so he asks to be notified when it hatches. Nate names the dinosaur Uncle Beazley, after his mom’s great-uncle John Beazley. The Triceratops begins to eat and grow—and eat and grow—and eat and grow, until most of the available grass in the whole neighborhood is gone. What will the Twitchells do, especially when the weather gets too cold for a dinosaur? Dr. Ziemer suggests sending it to the National Museum in Washington. But with the change from the quiet country to the busy city, what will happen to Uncle Beazley?

    I started liking this book as soon as I began reading it. Aside from a few common euphemisms (darn, gosh, golly, and gee), one use of the exclamation “My Lord,” and some references to tobacco use and a brand of whisky, the biggest objection that might be lodged against it is the evolutionary presuppositions undergirding the story. There are copious mentions of “millions of years ago.” While we creationists reject this hypothesized scenario, the vast majority of the world accepts it, and the book is fiction anyway, so with that understanding one can still enjoy the story. I did notice a couple of things about the book that I appreciated. Nate is told in no uncertain terms when he asks if they still have to go to church on the morning when the egg hatches that “there’s no reason to give up going to church just because we’ve got a dinosaur out back.” And the way Senator Granderson is pictured as wanting to get the federal government involved in nearly every aspect of our individual lives is certainly true to form.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2008

    What Joy

    Dating myself here, but I was looking for a book for my grandson and what do I find? One of the very first books I ever read. 48 years later, I still remember how much I loved this book, and now my grandson does as well. Some books are timeless, this is one of them.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2007

    A reviewer

    A boy finds a strange egg in the henhouse...and...well something great happens...as when my own boy collects different caterpillars and cocoons and all different moths and butterflies hatch from their keeping.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2007

    A reviewer

    The enourmous egg is a great book. It was about a dinosaur hatching out of a chicken egg. My favorite part of the book is when Nate and Uncle Beazley[dinosuar] were coming back from the Jefferson memorial. They tried to cross the road but Uncle Beazley was to slow and the light turned green and he was in the way. So the truck honked at him and he turned it over.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2004

    Enormous Egg

    I like this book because Nate has this big egg in his barn and it hatched into a dinosaur.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2004

    Enormous Egg

    I like this book, because it's a very good book for any child in the 5th grade. It's about a boy who finds a egg in the chicken coop, but it's not any kind of egg - just wait and see!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2003

    egg-o-licious

    i read this book for school thinking this book would be boring but boy was iwrong this is one of the best books iv ever read its worth every penny and every minute reading it!id recommend this to anybody!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2003

    An Enourmous Cheer for this Book!

    I have read this book a few times, and it always cheers me up. It also shows that even though some things can be fun, they can also turn into big messes- for entire cities! The fantastic story of a farm boy and his enourmous pet, this is a funny and timeless classic for kids any age- even grownups that are still kids.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2001

    Wow!

    I love this book. My favorite character was Dr. Zemer. He's cool!

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