Episcopalians (Denominations in America, #11)

Episcopalians (Denominations in America, #11)

by David Hein, Gardiner H. Shattuck
     
 

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The story of the Episcopalians in America is the story of an influential denomination that has furnished a disproportionately large share of the American political and cultural leadership. Beginning with the denomination's roots in 16th-century England, this book offers a fresh account of the Episcopal Church's rise to prominence in America. Chronologically

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Overview

The story of the Episcopalians in America is the story of an influential denomination that has furnished a disproportionately large share of the American political and cultural leadership. Beginning with the denomination's roots in 16th-century England, this book offers a fresh account of the Episcopal Church's rise to prominence in America. Chronologically arranged, it follows the establishment of colonial Anglicanism in the New World, the national organization of the denomination following the Revolution, its rise during the 19th century, and the complex array of forces that affected the church in the 20th century—and continue to affect it today. The authors pay particular attention to the established leadership of the Episcopal Church, as well as to the experience of the ordinary layperson, the form and function of sacred space, developments in church parties and theology, relations with other Christian communities, and the evolving roles and status of women and minorities.

Shining a light on the lives of ordinary churchgoers and historically marginalized groups, the authors reveal the strengths and weaknesses of the Episcopal Church. While the church evolved into the denomination of the urban establishment, a politically, theologically, and socially moderate religious body that appealed to those seeking the society of their largely middle- and upper-middle-class peers, it also appealed to those whom the dominant society excluded from power: African and Hispanic Americans, women, and American Indians. The volume concludes with a chronology of important events and biographical sketches of major figures in the Episcopal Church.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Hein (religion & philosophy, Hood Coll.) and Shattuck (history, Andover Newton Theological Sch.) profile the Episcopal Church in the 11th volume in Praeger's "Denominations in America" series. Its standard format includes a historical overview, biographical portraits of denominational leaders, and a bibliographic essay. The Episcopal Church has always played a role in American life disproportionate to its size. To explain why, this work's history extends back to the introduction of Christianity into England and its transformation into the Church of England during the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. A particularly interesting section details how the Episcopalians evolved from a Colonial church with George III as its head to an autonomous branch of the Anglican Communion, with the Archbishop of Canterbury as its spiritual leader. The history ends with the 2003 Minneapolis General Convention's approval of the consecration of the openly gay Gene Robinson as bishop, followed by threats of schism from the church's conservative wing. The biographical section profiles 100 lay and ordained church leaders over a 250-year span, and the bibliographic essay includes primary sources. Recommended for libraries owning earlier volumes in the series.-Richard S. Watts, San Bernardino Cty. Lib., CA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313229589
Publisher:
Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/30/2003
Series:
Denominations in America Series, #11
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
6.36(w) x 9.50(h) x 1.32(d)

Meet the Author

DAVID HEIN teaches in the Religion and Philosophy Department of Hood College. He is the author of Noble Powell and the Episcopal Establishment in the Twentieth Century and the coauthor of Essays on Lincoln's Faith and Politics.

GARDINER H. SHATTUCK JR. teaches in the History Department of Andover Newton Theological School. He is the author of Episcopalians and Race: Civil War to Civil Rights and the coauthor of The Encyclopedia of American Religious History.

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