The Eradication of Smallpox: Edward Jenner and The First and Only Eradication of a Human Infectious Disease / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$84.56
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $8.65
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 91%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $8.65   
  • New (6) from $96.47   
  • Used (3) from $8.65   

Overview

Simply, and with great humanity, The Eradication of Smallpox tells the story of smallpox - it's origins, the horror of the disease, and the millions of people killed or disfigured by it. During the 18th and 19th centuries, it is estimated that one out of every ten people died from the disease; some say one out of every seven. Smallpox attacked very young children in particular.
The story progresses with the practice of variolation, the life of Edward Jenner who first proposed 'vaccination' with cow pox vaccine (little James Phipps was the first person ever vaccinated in this way), the years of debate about the efficacy of this novel method, and the later worldwide initiatives to rid the planet of this horrific disease. In 1979, the story culminates in the only total eradication of an infectious disease that mankind has ever accomplished. This year celebrates the 20th anniversary of this momentous achievement.
In the intervening years, debate has raged about what we should do with the remaining smallpox viral stocks. Do we destroy them, so they can't fall into the hands of bioterrorists, or do we maintain them, in case they may be of use in some unexpected way, for therapeutic purposes? These questions are thoroughly discussed in the book.

Key Features
* Covers the background, history and origin of smallpox, and brings the story up to the present day
* Gives full and interesting details of Jenner's life, and tells how this humble country doctor brought about a revolution in vaccination
* Includes many quotes from historical figures
* Features 120 high quality photographs, many originating from unique historical plates in the author's private collection
* Includes new research data
* Provides new views on the eradication and destruction of smallpox

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

This important work describes the life and work of Jenner in the context of the eradication of Smallpox. The Smallpox virus has been the cause of vast human suffering. Smallpox was endemic in Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries, and had been responsible for the deaths of at least one tenth of the population for a long period of time. Edward Jenner's revolutionary vaccine not only spared the lives of many millions of people, but laid the foundation for modern vaccinology, which is probably the most important medical advance of this century.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Stuart M. Krassner, PhD (University of California Irvine)
Description: Edward Jenner's pioneering efforts in the use of cowpox vaccination to prevent smallpox ultimately led to the eradication of smallpox in 1979. With the eradication of smallpox over 30 years ago, most people today have little understanding of the horrors wreaked upon humanity by smallpox and what it took to successfully eliminate this devastating disease.
Purpose: The purpose is to tell how a simple country doctor was inspired to develop vaccination as the way to prevent smallpox and tells how the method was adapted to eradicate this disease. Given our current problems in dealing with infectious diseases, it is a timely work.
Audience: Written in a concise, non-technical style by a respected immunologist, both the general public and health professionals will find this a fascinating book.
Features: Jenner's vaccination method did not have the drawbacks of the older smallpox preventive measure, variolation (inoculation with smallpox from an infected person), which posed a high risk of infection and death and could spread to non-immune people in close contact with a recently variolated individual. The illustrations in the inserts include some graphic depictions of the dreadful effect of smallpox upon its victims. Jenner's life is detailed, including the struggle to win recognition for his method of preventing smallpox and its surprisingly rapid worldwide acceptance. The author deals very clearly with the ethical issue posed by Jenner's use of young James Phipps as an experimental subject. He argues persuasively for the destruction of the two remaining stores of the virus by pointing out that Vaccinia virus, which does not cause disease in humans, serves perfectly well as a vaccine source against smallpox. There is a useful glossary and detailed references.
Assessment: Although there are older books about the eradication of smallpox, they are generally out of print and are not as personal and succinct as this work.
From the Publisher
"copious illustrations are of considerable interest. ...Historians of medicine and public health may want to add it to their collections."
—Warren Winkelstein, Jr. for BULL. HIST. MED.(2002
From The Critics
Reviewer: Stuart M. Krassner, PhD(University of California Irvine)
Description: Edward Jenner's pioneering efforts in the use of cowpox vaccination to prevent smallpox ultimately led to the eradication of smallpox in 1979. With the eradication of smallpox over 30 years ago, most people today have little understanding of the horrors wreaked upon humanity by smallpox and what it took to successfully eliminate this devastating disease.
Purpose: The purpose is to tell how a simple country doctor was inspired to develop vaccination as the way to prevent smallpox and tells how the method was adapted to eradicate this disease. Given our current problems in dealing with infectious diseases, it is a timely work.
Audience: Written in a concise, non-technical style by a respected immunologist, both the general public and health professionals will find this a fascinating book.
Features: Jenner's vaccination method did not have the drawbacks of the older smallpox preventive measure, variolation (inoculation with smallpox from an infected person), which posed a high risk of infection and death and could spread to non-immune people in close contact with a recently variolated individual. The illustrations in the inserts include some graphic depictions of the dreadful effect of smallpox upon its victims. Jenner's life is detailed, including the struggle to win recognition for his method of preventing smallpox and its surprisingly rapid worldwide acceptance. The author deals very clearly with the ethical issue posed by Jenner's use of young James Phipps as an experimental subject. He argues persuasively for the destruction of the two remaining stores of the virus by pointing out that Vaccinia virus, which does not cause disease in humans, serves perfectly well as a vaccine source against smallpox. There is a useful glossary and detailed references.
Assessment: Although there are older books about the eradication of smallpox, they are generally out of print and are not as personal and succinct as this work.
Choice
Written in a concise, nontechnical style by a respected immunologist, both the general public and health professionals will find this a fascinating book.
Brian W.J. Mahy
...fresh, enjoyable account of smallpox eradication... [The author] displays a remarkable knowledge and interest in the life and activities of Edward Jenner... Though originally written in French, this translation by Andrew and Glenise Morgan is faultless, and I strongly recommend this book to all students of immunology, virology, and vaccinology.
John A.T. Young
We owe much to Edward Jenner, and I encourage everyone who is interested in this story and its important impact upon the disciplines of science and medicine to read Dr. Bazin's book. I imagine that you too will be unable to put it down until you have read it from cover to cover.
Stuart M. Krassner
Edward Jenner's pioneering efforts in the use of cowpox vaccination to prevent smallpox ultimately led to the eradication of smallpox in 1979. With the eradication of smallpox over 30 years ago, most people today have little understanding of the horrors wreaked upon humanity by smallpox and what it took to successfully eliminate this devastating disease. The purpose is to tell how a simple country doctor was inspired to develop vaccination as the way to prevent smallpox and tells how the method was adapted to eradicate this disease. Given our current problems in dealing with infectious diseases, it is a timely work. Written in a concise, non-technical style by a respected immunologist, both the general public and health professionals will find this a fascinating book. Jenner's vaccination method did not have the drawbacks of the older smallpox preventive measure, variolation (inoculation with smallpox from an infected person), which posed a high risk of infection and death and could spread to non-immune people in close contact with a recently variolated individual. The illustrations in the inserts include some graphic depictions of the dreadful effect of smallpox upon its victims. Jenner's life is detailed, including the struggle to win recognition for his method of preventing smallpox and its surprisingly rapid worldwide acceptance. The author deals very clearly with the ethical issue posed by Jenner's use of young James Phipps as an experimental subject. He argues persuasively for the destruction of the two remaining stores of the virus by pointing out that Vaccinia virus, which does not cause disease in humans, serves perfectly well as a vaccine source against smallpox.There is a useful glossary and detailed references. Although there are older books about the eradication of smallpox, they are generally out of print and are not as personal and succinct as this work.

3 Stars from Doody
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780120834754
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 2/2/2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 246
  • Product dimensions: 0.63 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Hervé Bazin is Professeur Extraordinaire at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Louvain, Belgium.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements.
Foreword.
Chronology: The life of Edward Jenner
Introduction.
For those who have forgotten or never knew what smallpox was like:
On the long struggle of man, before Jenner, to fight smallpox.
The life and work of Jenner:
The young Jenner (1749-1772).
Jenner, naturalist and country surgeon.
The myth becomes reality (1795-1798).
Jenner's hard-won victory in England, his own country.
The particular case of Napoleonic France.
Vaccination spreads across Europe and the United States and then throughout the rest of the world.
Honours and resentment for Jenner (1801-1823).
The perfect ending to the story: the eradication of smallpox:
Post-Jennerian vaccination (1823-1979).
Smallpox vaccination: its value and its limitations.
The anti-vaccination movements (1798-1979).
The eradication of smallpox: Jenner's posthumous triumph.
Jenner, vaccination and ethics (1796 to the present day).
What should be done about the smallpox virus?
Conclusion.
Some comments on current immunity to smallpox.
Glossary.
References.
Index.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)