Eros of Everyday Life: Essays on Ecology, Gender and Society

Overview

Griffin examines the nature of women and women's roles in Western culture, and shows how the ways that we subordinate the role of women in society are deliberately similar to the ways that we attempt to exclude and subordinate nature. Featuring the brilliant original title essay that is nothing less than an intellectual and emotional exploration of the nature of Western society itself, as well as Susan Griffin's best previously published essays over the past decade, The Eros of Everyday Life combines the ...
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Overview

Griffin examines the nature of women and women's roles in Western culture, and shows how the ways that we subordinate the role of women in society are deliberately similar to the ways that we attempt to exclude and subordinate nature. Featuring the brilliant original title essay that is nothing less than an intellectual and emotional exploration of the nature of Western society itself, as well as Susan Griffin's best previously published essays over the past decade, The Eros of Everyday Life combines the beautiful lyricism and sensibility of a poet with the intellectual rigor of one of the finest and most original minds writing today.

The author of the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Critics Circle Award nominee A Chorus of Stones brings readers a brilliant and extraordinarily eloquent new collection of essays on the relationship between feminism, nature, and the evolution of Western culture.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Poet Griffin offers a collection of essays exploring the social and philosophical connections between science and nature from a feminist perspective. Sept.
Library Journal
Readers and fans have come to expect much from Griffin. Her last book, A Chorus of Stones LJ 9/15/92, was a finalist for a Pulitzer and a National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism. Griffin easily delivers with her latest work, a collection of her best essays over the past ten years, plus some new pieces. Continuing her well-established feminist quest to examine women's roles in society, Griffin eloquently addresses what she considers the nightmarish fashion in which Western culture similarly treats women and nature. She dresses up resplendent autobiographical pieces and keen social commentary with a poet's lyricism and a scholar's intellect. In "A Collaborative Intelligence," she concludes, "The task is to study the nightmare that has driven us to self-destruction." She accomplishes this task and sets readers to reflecting on how to bring Western society back from the brink. For women's studies collections.-Faye A. Chadwell, Univ. of Oregon, Eugene
Donna Seaman
Griffin, a scintillating and enthralling feminist thinker, defines eros as the recognition of the grand commingling that is life. We are an integral part of this miracle, and human consciousness as well as the capacity for love, Griffin reminds us, evolved right along with the rest of nature. This unifying perception is at the heart of this magnificent essay collection, which is bound for the sort of glory won by her last book, "A Chorus of Stones" 1992. Here, as Griffin ponders our intimate relationship with the planet, she offers some stimulating thoughts on what she believes is a mighty paradigmatic shift in the making. As we become more alienated from nature, our old belief systems are breaking down, forcing us to create new philosophies. As Griffin tries to predict what form they will take, she assesses the damage traditional Western habits of mind have wrought on both our psyche and our environment. These are lustrous and mind-stretching essays, made personal with swatches of autobiography and made beautiful with a passion for life and the power of mind.
From the Publisher
"Nobody writes more lyrically about ecology or more wisely about gender than Susan Griffin. And nobody knows better how the two must be seen as one. This nourishing book is an example of her work at its best."— Theodore Roszak, author of The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein

"Griffin's essays yearn in a wonderful direction."—Hungry Mind Review

From Barnes & Noble
Revealing theprofound connections between religion & philosophy, science & nature, & the supremacy of abstract thought over the forces of life, the author presents an array of essays on the nature of women & their roles in Western culture.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780808161264
  • Publisher: Doubleday Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/1/1995
  • Pages: 246

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