The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth: First True Account of Lincoln's Assassination [NOOK Book]

Overview

The complete title for this edition is "The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth or the First True Account of Lincoln's Assassination Containing a Complete Confession by Booth Many Years After the Crime". The book gives in full detail the plans, plot, and intrigue of the conspirators, and the treachery of Andrew johnson, then Vice President of the United States. According to the author, the book was written for the correction of history.

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The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth: First True Account of Lincoln's Assassination

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Overview

The complete title for this edition is "The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth or the First True Account of Lincoln's Assassination Containing a Complete Confession by Booth Many Years After the Crime". The book gives in full detail the plans, plot, and intrigue of the conspirators, and the treachery of Andrew johnson, then Vice President of the United States. According to the author, the book was written for the correction of history.

Author Finis Langdon Bates ( August 22, 1848 – November 29, 1923 ) was a Memphis, Tennessee, lawyer and author of The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth (1907). In this 309-page book, Bates claimed that John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, not only was not mortally wounded by Union Army Sergeant Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett on April 26, 1865, but that Booth successfully eluded capture altogether, and lived for many years thereafter under a series of assumed names, notably John St. Helen and David E. George.

Bates was born on a plantation in Itawamba County, Mississippi, in 1848. He was the ninth of 12 children of planter Henderson Wesley Bates (Sept. 30, 1807–1869) and Eliza Elvira Jarratt Bourland (Dec. 26, 1815 – Feb. 23, 1900). Finis Bates studied law in Carrollton, Mississippi, and in the 1870s he and his family moved to Texas, where he met John St. Helen. Bates returned to Mississippi, then moved to Memphis, Tennessee, after the death of his first wife and his subsequent marriage.

According to The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth, in 1873, Bates met John St. Helen, a liquor and tobacco merchant in Granbury, Texas. The man had a particular tendency toward the theatrical and could recite Shakespeare from memory. Bates and St. Helen cultivated a friendship over five years. In 1878, St. Helen became ill, stating:

"I am dying. My name is John Wilkes Booth, and I am the assassin of President Lincoln. Get the picture of myself from under the pillow. I leave it with you for my future identification. Notify my brother Edwin Booth, of New York City."

St. Helen later recovered and explained in greater detail: The leader of the conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln was Vice-President Andrew Johnson.

The identity of the man mortally wounded in the Garrett tobacco barn by Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett was a plantation overseer by the name of Ruddy. St. Helen/Booth had asked Ruddy to fetch his papers, which had fallen out of his pocket while crossing the Rappahannock River. Ruddy was able to retrieve Booth's papers, and while still in possession of them, Ruddy was mortally wounded in the Garrett barn, thus leading his captors to believe that he was Booth.

Shortly thereafter, St. Helen moved on to Leadville, Colorado, to pursue mining, and Bates moved to Memphis, losing track of St. Helen. Bates claimed not to have believed St. Helen's story at the time, calling it an "unpleasant side of St. Helen's character." Bates described him as "modest, unobtrusive and congenial, ever pleasant in association with me. He was a social favorite with all with whom he came in contact." Despite his claims of disbelief, in 1900, Bates wrote the War Department in an unsuccessful attempt to claim the $100,000 reward advertised following Lincoln's assassination.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015543032
  • Publisher: Balefire Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/2/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 350
  • Sales rank: 1,325,806
  • File size: 14 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Finis Langdon Bates ( August 22, 1848 – November 29, 1923 ) was a Memphis, Tennessee, lawyer and author of The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth (1907). In this 309-page book, Bates claimed that John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, not only was not mortally wounded by Union Army Sergeant Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett on April 26, 1865, but that Booth successfully eluded capture altogether, and lived for many years thereafter under a series of assumed names, notably John St. Helen and David E. George.

Bates was born on a plantation in Itawamba County, Mississippi, in 1848. He was the ninth of 12 children of planter Henderson Wesley Bates (Sept. 30, 1807–1869) and Eliza Elvira Jarratt Bourland (Dec. 26, 1815 – Feb. 23, 1900). Finis Bates studied law in Carrollton, Mississippi, and in the 1870s he and his family moved to Texas, where he met John St. Helen. Bates returned to Mississippi, then moved to Memphis, Tennessee, after the death of his first wife and his subsequent marriage.

According to The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth, in 1873, Bates met John St. Helen, a liquor and tobacco merchant in Granbury, Texas. The man had a particular tendency toward the theatrical and could recite Shakespeare from memory. Bates and St. Helen cultivated a friendship over five years. In 1878, St. Helen became ill, stating:

"I am dying. My name is John Wilkes Booth, and I am the assassin of President Lincoln. Get the picture of myself from under the pillow. I leave it with you for my future identification. Notify my brother Edwin Booth, of New York City."

St. Helen later recovered and explained in greater detail: The leader of the conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln was Vice-President Andrew Johnson.

The identity of the man mortally wounded in the Garrett tobacco barn by Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett was a plantation overseer by the name of Ruddy. St. Helen/Booth had asked Ruddy to fetch his papers, which had fallen out of his pocket while crossing the Rappahannock River. Ruddy was able to retrieve Booth's papers, and while still in possession of them, Ruddy was mortally wounded in the Garrett barn, thus leading his captors to believe that he was Booth.

Shortly thereafter, St. Helen moved on to Leadville, Colorado, to pursue mining, and Bates moved to Memphis, losing track of St. Helen. Bates claimed not to have believed St. Helen's story at the time.
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  • Posted March 8, 2013

    Highly Recommended

    This is an important book dating back to events that happened, and as such bears a direct connection to those individuals who were responsible for these events. History largely is viewed by writers or editors who have recorded these events second or third hand, and as such may experience distortions or outright falsities. Living in Baltimore, Maryland, I am very close to the Booth Family history, John Wilkes having been partly raised in a Baltimore suburb known as Catonsville before moving to a home in the northern part of the state. It is reported that he is buried in the Greenmount Cemetery in Baltimore City. However, this has not been verified. I would encourage readers that are fascinated by the history of this period to read this book along with others, such as the book "One Mad Act" written by Ogarita Booth, that sheds new light on the true events of the time. We have no reason to continue to put forth the false records that have been perpetrated by false historians when there is a wealth of material on the subject to correct this history for posterity.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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