Essays

Essays

2.0 2
by Francis Bacon
     
 

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The Essays - or Counsels, Civil and Moral of Francis Bacon is an unchanged, high-quality reprint of the original edition of 1890.
Hansebooks is editor of the literature on different topic areas such as research and science, travel and expeditions, cooking and nutrition, medicine, and other genres.As a publisher we focus on the preservation of historical…  See more details below

Overview

The Essays - or Counsels, Civil and Moral of Francis Bacon is an unchanged, high-quality reprint of the original edition of 1890.
Hansebooks is editor of the literature on different topic areas such as research and science, travel and expeditions, cooking and nutrition, medicine, and other genres.As a publisher we focus on the preservation of historical literature.Many works of historical writers and scientists are available today as antiques only. Hansebooks newly publishes these books and contributes to the preservation of literature which has become rare and historical knowledge for the future.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781438534114
Publisher:
Standard Publications, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/31/2009
Pages:
136
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.29(d)

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Excerpt from book:
and expectations. Death hath this also, that it openeth the gate to good fame, and extinguisheth envy : " Extinctus amabitur idem." l III.—OF UNITY IN RELIGION. Religion being the chief band of human society, it is a happy thing when itself is well contained within the true band of unity. The quarrels and divisions about religion were evils unknown to the heathen. The reason was, because the religion of the heathen consisted rather in rites and ceremonies, than in any constant belief; for you may imagine what kind of faith theirs was, when the chief doctors and fathers of their church were the poets. But the true God hath this attribute, that he is a jealous God; and therefore his worship and religion will endure no mixture nor partner. We shall therefore speak a few words concerning the unity of the church; what are the fruits thereof; what the bounds ; and what the means. The fruits of unity, (next unto the well-pleasing of God, which is all in all.) are two; the one to- wards those that are without the church, the other itowards those that are within. For the former, it is certain that heresies and schisms are, of all others, :the greatest scandals, yea, more than corruption of had revealed, " that he should not see death before he had seen the Lord's Christ." When he beheld the infant Jesns in the temple, he took the child in his arms and burst forth into a song of thanksgiving, commencing, " Lord, now lettest tliou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word, for mine eyes have seen thy salvation." — S/.. Luke ii. 29. 1 " When dead, the same person shall be beloved." — Ear. Ep. ii. 1, 14. manners ; for as in the natural bodya wound or solution of continuity is worse than a corrupt humor, so in the spiritual; so that nothing doth so much keep men out...

Meet the Author

Francis Bacon, philosopher, essayist, lawyer and statesman, was born in London in 1561. He studied at Cambridge and was enrolled at Gray’s Inn in 1576. In 1584 he entered Parliament as the member for Melcombe Regis, subsequently representing other constituencies. Bacon made the acquaintance of the Earl of Essex, who endeavored to advance him in his career. Nevertheless, having been appointed to investigate the causes of Essex’s revolt in 1601, Bacon was largely responsible for the earl’s conviction. Bacon was appointed Solicitor-General in 1607 and was successively Attorney-General (1613), Lord Keeper (1617) and Lord Chancellor (1618). He was created Baron Verulam in 1618 and Viscount St. Albans in 1621. Later in that year he was charged with bribery and confessed that he had been guilty of ‘corruption and neglect’ but denied that he had ever perverted justice. He was deprived of the Great Seal, fined, imprisoned in the Tower and disabled from sitting in Parliament. Following his release, he retired to the family home at Gorhambury, Hertfordshire, and his remaining years were spent in literary and philosophical work. It was Bacon’s ambition to create a new system of philosophy to replace that of Aristotle, and he has been justly acclaimed as an inspiration to later scientists, rationalists and materialists. Of his philosophical works, the principal and best known are The Advancement of Learning, Novum Organum and De Augmentis. He also wrote several professional works including Maxims of the Law and Reading on the Statue of Uses. Of his literary writings the most important are the Essays (1597; issued in final form in 1625), De Sapientia Veterum, Apophthegms New and Old and a History of Henry VII. Francis Bacon died in 1626

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