The Essential Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers

The Essential Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers

by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay
     
 

Here, in a single volume, is a selection of the classic critiques of the new Constitution penned by such ardent defenders of states' rights and personal liberty as George Mason, Patrick Henry, and Melancton Smith; pro-Constitution writings by James Wilson and Noah Webster; and thirty-three of the best-known and most crucial Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton,

See more details below

Overview

Here, in a single volume, is a selection of the classic critiques of the new Constitution penned by such ardent defenders of states' rights and personal liberty as George Mason, Patrick Henry, and Melancton Smith; pro-Constitution writings by James Wilson and Noah Webster; and thirty-three of the best-known and most crucial Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. The texts of the chief constitutional documents of the early Republic are included as well.

David Wootton's illuminating Introduction examines the history of such American principles of government as checks and balances, the separation of powers, representation by election, and judicial independence—including their roots in the largely Scottish, English, and French new science of politics. It also offers suggestions for reading The Federalist, the classic elaboration of these principles written in defense of a new Constitution that sought to apply them to the young Republic.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449579166
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
11/06/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
766
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.53(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
Understanding the Constitution
Suggestions for Further Reading
Notes on the Authors and Texts
The Anti-Federalists
Objections to the Constitution of Government Formed by the Convention1
Address of the Minority of the Pennsylvania Convention3
Speech of Patrick Henry before the Virginia Ratifying Convention25
Speeches of Melancton Smith before the New York Ratifying Convention42
Letters of Cato (4 and 5)58
Letters of Centinel (1)65
Essays of Brutus (6, 11, 12, 15)74
The Constitution Defended97
Speech of James Wilson before the Pennsylvania Convention97
An Examination into the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution110
The Federalist140
No. 1Introduction140
No. 2Concerning the Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence143
No. 6Concerning the Dangers from War between the States147
No. 7The Subject Continued and Particular Causes Enumerated152
No. 8The Effects of Internal War in Producing Standing Armies and Other Institutions Unfriendly to Liberty158
No. 9The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard against Domestic Faction and Insurrection162
No. 10The Same Subject Continued167
No. 12The Utility of the Union in Respect to Revenue174
No. 14An Objection Drawn from the Extent of Country Answered179
No. 15Concerning the Defects of the Present Confederation in Relation to the Principle of Legislation for the States in Their Collective Capacities183
No. 16The Same Subject Continued in Relation to the Same Principle190
No. 23The Necessity of a Government at Least Equally Energetic with the One Proposed195
No. 24The Subject Continued with an Answer to an Objection Concerning Standing Armies199
No. 28The Same Subject Concluded203
No. 31[Concerning Taxation]: The Same Subject Continued207
No. 33The Same Subject Continued211
No. 35The Same Subject Continued214
No. 37Concerning the Difficulties Which the Convention Must Have Experienced in the Formation of a Proper Plan219
No. 39The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles: An Objection in Respect to the Powers of the Convention Examined225
No. 47The Meaning of the Maxim, Which Requires a Separation of the Departments of Power, Examined and Ascertained231
No. 48The Same Subject Continued with a View to the Means of Giving Efficacy in Practice to That Maxim237
No. 49The Same Subject Continued with the Same View241
No. 51The Same Subject Continued with the Same View and Concluded245
No. 52Concerning the House of Representatives, with a View to the Qualifications of the Electors and Elected, and the Time of Service of the Members250
No. 55The Same Subject Continued in Relation to the Total Number of the Body254
No. 57The Same Subject Continued in Relation to the Supposed Tendency of the Plan of the Convention to Elevate the Few above the Many258
No. 62Concerning the Constitution of the Senate with Regard to the Qualifications of the Members, the Manner of Appointing Them, the Equality of Representation, the Number of the Senators, and the Duration of Their Appointments263
No. 63A Further View of the Constitution of the Senate in Regard to the Duration of Appointment of Its Members268
No. 70[Concerning the Constitution of the President]: The Same Subject Continued in Relation to the Unity of the Executive, with an Examination of the Project of an Executive Council275
No. 78A View of the Constitution of the Judicial Department in Relation to the Tenure of Good Behavior283
No. 83A Further View of the Judicial Department in Relation to the Trial by Jury289
No. 84Concerning Several Miscellaneous Objections301
No. 85Conclusion310
The Constitiutional Documents317
Articles of Confederation317
The Virginia Plan324
Constitution of the United States of America326
Bill of Rights337
Index339

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >