Essential George Jones: The Spirit of Country

The Essential George Jones: The Spirit of Country

by George Jones
     
 

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If any artist cried out for a cross-licensed, multi-label retrospective, it was George Jones. When Epic/Legacy released the double-disc The Essential George Jones: The Spirit of Country in 1994, he had recorded for no less than six labels -- in chronological order: Starday, Mercury, United Artists, Musicor, Epic, MCA (since then,

Overview

If any artist cried out for a cross-licensed, multi-label retrospective, it was George Jones. When Epic/Legacy released the double-disc The Essential George Jones: The Spirit of Country in 1994, he had recorded for no less than six labels -- in chronological order: Starday, Mercury, United Artists, Musicor, Epic, MCA (since then, he's added two more labels: Elektra and BNA/RCA) -- over the course of four decades, a discographical nightmare if there ever was one. The Spirit of Country was the first (and, to date, only) to attempt a serious, multi-label overview of George Jones' lengthy career, and while it has a few flaws, it nevertheless is indeed essential as an overview of his prolific work, tracing his hits from 1955's "Why Baby Why" to 1989's wonderful "The King Is Gone (And So Are You)." That means there's nothing from his MCA records here, but that's not a major problem, since his peak ended when he left Epic, and that entire peak is chronicled here. It is not chronicled evenhandedly, though. Starday and Mercury account for the first seven tracks, then UA is rushed through in three cuts, before moving to five Musicor sides (including "A Good Year for the Roses," previously unavailable on CD). This means the '50s and '60s are finished in 15 tracks, with the remaining 29 songs all from his Epic work of the '70s and '80s. This is a bit of an imbalance, and it's hard not to wish that some of the missing songs -- whether it's "What Am I Worth" or "Things Have Gone to Pieces" -- were here, but, that said, there are no truly essential items missing from his pre-Epic sides. As far as the Epic material is concerned, the 1982 collection Anniversary may have arranged the material in a more dramatic fashion, but 14 of that record's 22 songs are here, including all the really big hits, although there are enough great songs absent -- "Nothing Ever Hurt Me (Half as Bad as Losing You)," "What My Woman Can't Do," "The Battle," and "Memories of Us" -- to still make that collection necessary (much as Rhino's The Best of George Jones [1955-1967] still serves a valuable need). But, this set not only has songs unavailable on other collections, it does do its job very well, providing the best available overview of George Jones' career. It might not have everything, but it has all the important sides, and there simply isn't a better way to get acquainted with George Jones than this.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/18/1998
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0074646571828
catalogNumber:
65718

Tracks

Disc 1

  1. Why Baby Why
  2. Just One More
  3. Color of the Blues
  4. White Lightning
  5. Who Shot Sam
  6. The Window Up Above
  7. Tender Years
  8. She Thinks I Still Care
  9. We Must Have Been Out of Our Minds
  10. The Race Is On
  11. Love Bug
  12. I'm a People
  13. Walk Through This World With Me
  14. If My Heart Had Windows
  15. A Good Year for the Roses
  16. We Can Make It
  17. The Ceremony
  18. Loving You Could Never Be Better
  19. A Picture of Me (Without You)
  20. We're Gonna Hold On
  21. Once You've Had the Best
  22. The Grand Tour

Disc 2

  1. The Door
  2. These Days (I Barely Get By)
  3. Golden Ring
  4. Her Name Is...
  5. Near You
  6. Bartender's Blues
  7. Maybelline
  8. Two Story House
  9. He Stopped Loving Her Today
  10. I'm Not Ready Yet
  11. If Drinkin' Don't Kill Me (Her Memory Will)
  12. Still Doin' Time
  13. Same Ole Me
  14. Yesterday's Wine
  15. I Always Get Lucky With You
  16. Tennessee Whiskey
  17. We Didn't See a Thing
  18. She's My Rock
  19. Who's Gonna Fill Their Shoes
  20. Wine Colored Roses
  21. I'm a One Woman Man
  22. The King Is Gone (So Are You)

Album Credits

Performance Credits

George Jones   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Chet Atkins   Track Performer
Merle Haggard   Vocals,Track Performer
Melba Montgomery   Vocals,Track Performer
Johnny Paycheck   Vocals,Track Performer
Tammy Wynette   Vocals,Track Performer
Ray Charles   Track Performer
James Taylor   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Chet Atkins   Contributor
Clint Black   Author
Garth Brooks   Author
Joe Diffie   Author
Merle Haggard   Composer
Johnny Horton   Composer
George Jones   Composer,Contributor
Patty Loveless   Author
Willie Nelson   Producer
Paul Overstreet   Composer
Johnny Paycheck   Composer
Travis Tritt   Author
Tammy Wynette   Composer,Author
Elvis Costello   Author
James Taylor   Composer
Ray Jackson   Composer
Carmol Taylor   Composer
Bobby Braddock   Composer
Gary Church   Composer
Pappy Daily   Producer
Dallas Frazier   Composer
A.L. Owens   Composer
Freddy Powers   Composer
Curly Putman   Composer
George Richey   Composer
Don Rollins   Composer
Billy Sherrill   Composer,Producer
Glenn Sutton   Composer
Curtis Wayne   Composer
Norro Wilson   Composer
Rich Kienzle   Liner Notes
Francis Craig   Composer
Tillman Franks   Composer
Wayne Kemp   Composer
Hope Chasin   Packaging Manager
Julian Peploe   Art Direction
Slick Lawson   Cover Photo
Rick Beresford   Composer
Robert Constanzo   Packaging Manager
Rob Goellner   Composer
Karl Sanders   Composer
Darrell Edwards   Composer
David Lindsay   Composer
Dickey Lee Lipscomb   Composer
Jenny Strickland   Composer
Gene Dobbins   Composer
Glenn Tubb   Composer
Tex Whitson   Composer
John Moffatt   Composer
Steve Duffy   Composer
Roger D. Ferris   Composer
Dennis Knutson   Composer

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