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The Eternal City: Roman Images in the Modern World

Overview

A major new interpretation of the impact of ancient Rome on our culture, this study charts the effects of two diametrically opposed views of Roman antiquity: the virtuous republic of self-less citizen soldiers and the corrupt empire of power-hungry tyrants. The power of these images is second only to those derived from Christianity in constructing our modern culture. Few modern readers are aware of how indebted we are to the Roman model of our ...
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Overview

A major new interpretation of the impact of ancient Rome on our culture, this study charts the effects of two diametrically opposed views of Roman antiquity: the virtuous republic of self-less citizen soldiers and the corrupt empire of power-hungry tyrants. The power of these images is second only to those derived from Christianity in constructing our modern culture. Few modern readers are aware of how indebted we are to the Roman model of our political philosophy, art, music, cinema, opera, and drama.

Originally published in 1987.

A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Bondanella has an original theme, and brings to it an unusually wide knowledge in the fields of literature, art history, and the place of film in twentieth-century culture."—Denis Mack Smith, All Souls College, Oxford
Library Journal
The ``myth of Rome'' was created in antiquity, first by Livy, who idealized the values of the Republic, then by Tacitus, who portrayed the limits of freedom under the Emperors. Bondanella traces these images from their use as metaphors of modern life during the Renaissance to their influence upon the most influential and creative thinkers, artists, and politicians of Western historythough the serious treatment of Isaac Asimov and Star Wars is a great surprise in this context. Lavishly illustrated, this marvelous survey compels us to confront the continuing relevance of the Roman myth to our daily lives. James S. Ruebel, Iowa State Univ., Ames
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807865118
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
  • Publication date: 5/20/2011
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 0.69 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

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